Hidden in Afghanistan: Soviet Veterans of a Previous War Compare and Tremble

There are only a few of them left — deserters and MIAs of the huge Soviet Red Army divisions sent in to control Afghanistan. But they still remember how it all ended — and worry that the American war will end the same way

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John Wendle for TIME

Old Soviet armored personnel carriers, tanks and artillery litter the countryside and cities of Afghanistan. Villagers in Khwaja Zaid in northern Afghanistan use two armored vehicles placed along the riverbank to help prevent flood damage to their houses and as a place to dry laundry

Image: Gennady Tseuma, with his son, Samiullah

John Wendle for TIME

Even after three decades, Gennady Tseuma remembers the wavering call to prayer that went up clear over the hillside village. It floated out over the fields and river and pierced the early morning hush on the Bangi Bridge. Tseuma, then a Soviet soldier assigned to a small force guarding the river crossing in northern Afghanistan’s Kunduz province, recalls a feeling of dread when he heard the sound. Like many of the conscripts serving in the Red Army in Afghanistan, Tseuma was bored and undisciplined, and after 10 months of service, curiosity finally got the best of him.

The decision to investigate the call to prayer cost him the life he had known up to that point. “Our checkpoint was close to the village. Every morning the mullah did the call to prayer. It was totally new to me. I didn’t understand what was going on. I thought maybe they were killing people or something,” Tseuma tells TIME. “So, one day, early in the morning, I got off my base to take a look. When I got close to the mosque there was an old man sitting there. Then suddenly men with guns surrounded me and captured me. After that, the mujahedin told me to convert to Islam or they would kill me. I decided it was better to live than to die, so I became a Muslim.”

(PHOTOS: A Long and Distant War: Photos from Afghanistan, 1988-2009)

For the past 29 years, Tseuma and maybe around a hundred other Soviet POW/MIAs have lived through some of the most violent history of one of the most violent countries on earth. After serving in the European-style Soviet army, they lived and sometimes fought as Afghans. Those of them still alive have an extraordinary window into Afghan society combined with unique insight into the historical parallels between the Soviet defeat and the withdrawal of U.S. and NATO forces at the end of 2014.

Life has improved in the past 10 years but Tseuma — or Nek Mohammad as he was renamed after his conversion to Islam — senses grave danger ahead. “I’m afraid. Right now there are roads and there is light. But let’s see what happens down the road. Then there won’t be lights. Then the war will start,” he says. “People will be gobbled up everywhere. People will start killing each other. Then what will be here? Life will be here, but it will be bad.”

Mohammad switches off the TV set — he had been watching a Russian quiz show playing via satellite TV in the guest room of his mud-brick house on the edge of Kunduz city. He seems to be pondering both the past and the future with his quick, blue eyes — eyes that contrast with the white of his shalwar kameez — the traditional clothing of an Afghan man. “The Soviet government was looking for us, but I didn’t let them find me because I didn’t know what they would do to me,” says Mohammad in the soft-accented Russian of his native eastern Ukraine. The mujahedin pushed him to wage jihad against his former comrades, but “I have not shot one bullet since I became a Muslim,” he says.

Mohammad lived as a prisoner in the compound of a local mujahedin commander, which lies just a few miles from his old post with the Red Army. Many of the other shuravi — as the vets are known in the former Soviet Union — had similar experiences. “When they were captured, they became slaves. Psychologically, these guys are damaged,” Alexander Lavrentyev, the vice-chairman of Russia’s War Veterans Committee, tells TIME. “They are in their late 40s, but they all look like they are in their 60s.”

(PHOTOS: Afghans Protest Against Alleged Koran Desecration)

In a vicious and confused war, the Afgantsy — another term for the Soviet vets — could disappear “like a puff of smoke,” says Lavrentyev. “Afghans were sitting, watching and you didn’t know if they were mujahedin or not. And that’s it. They’d pull you behind a wall and the troops would never find you again.” There are the stories of Soviet soldiers being stolen in the night, the stories of fighters disappearing after wandering onto remote corners of their own base, or the stories that begin and end with “they went to a village to buy cigarettes, and suddenly …,” Lavrentyev says. “And those were not isolated incidents.” Around 266 are still missing, he says. Some of those were buried in Afghanistan in unmarked graves — like the set of six uniformed remains accidentally unearthed by a bulldozer a few years ago at an old Soviet camp in Kunduz — now the base of the German Provincial Reconstruction Team. Lavrentyev has found 29 alive so far, and 22 have returned home. The rest have chosen to stay because they have family or because — to Lavrentyev at least — they have become more Afghan than Soviet.

But, Lavrentyev’s hopes of finding more of the vets alive are fading. Right now he estimates that only 20 to 40 of the 266 MIAs could still be alive and the trail is getting colder as time passes and history is forgotten. “Soon there will be no first-person memory of this history because everyone who was young then will be 50 or 60 years old and life expectancy in Afghanistan isn’t that long,” he tells TIME during his most recent search mission.

After the Soviet army withdrew, Mohammad slowly gained his freedom and moved to Kunduz city and worked as a long-haul trucker, ferrying goods all over northern Afghanistan. He somehow survived the chaos of the Soviet pullout and the civil war that ripped apart the country from 1992 to ’96. Surprisingly, life under the Taliban was easier. “The Taliban never touched me when they were in power. They were proud of me because I became a Muslim,” Mohammad says. Today he is married to an ethnic-Tajik Afghan woman from a nearby province. They have two sons and a daughter. He is part of his community. But, as the U.S. and NATO withdrawal nears, he worries for the future of his family — and he says his friends, neighbors and relatives are also worried, a sentiment echoed by the two other Soviet vets TIME was able to track down.

Sergei Krasnoperov says even the relative stability at the moment is not so great. Krasnoperov deserted after he was caught selling military supplies and faced stiff punishment. He went over to the mujahedin, converted to Islam, was renamed Noor Mohammad and fought against the Soviets — even serving as a bodyguard to ethnic-Uzbek warlord Abdul Rashid Dostum. He is now married to an Afghan woman, has six children, works part-time for the local electricity department and also repairs truck parts in the city of Chaghcharan in Ghor province, near his old base.

(PHOTOS: Afghanistan Now, Photographs by Yuri Kozyrev)

“Now you can’t understand who is working with the government and who is not — who is on which side is impossible to understand,” the Russian tells TIME in a crackly phone interview. “Even in the city, government power is not strongly felt. You can kill two or three people and jump on a motorcycle and that’s it. No one will say anything or come after you.” Even from his village point of view, he reflects widely held fears that the Afghan army and police will evaporate once foreign funding dries up — an idea denied by the U.S. and NATO. “Those [soldiers and police who] are paid, they simply do not fight. They do nothing. When the month ends, they take their next pay and that’s it. They are not on any side — only on the side of the money.” His take on the current government is just as harsh, saying: “Corruption here isn’t very clear. I only understand right now what the government doesn’t do — they do nothing. They only take bribes and kill people. The government here is a joke. If the Americans weren’t here right now, there would be no power at all, it would just be a bunch of robbers.”

Image: Alexander Levenets

John Wendle for TIME

Back in Kunduz, Alexander Levenets, another of the shuravi, sees similar problems. After the Soviets left, he says, “the Afghan National Army was completely destroyed, but now we have an army and police. However, those people get their salary from America. If America leaves, they will also be destroyed. There will be nothing of them left. There will be nothing here to control them and pay them.” Like Noor Mohammad, Levenets deserted and joined the mujahedin after selling supplies to the enemy and being caught by his commanding officer. He fled, converted to Islam, took the name Ahmad and fought against the Soviets. Eventually he married an ethnic-Tajik Afghan woman and now has five daughters. He works as a taxi driver and his wife is a teacher.

Drinking green Afghan tea, Nek Mohammad is less decided about the current state of affairs, but just as pessimistic about the future. “The Americans did not make a mistake coming here,” he says. “Before, I didn’t have electricity. Now I do. Before, there wasn’t a good road. Now there is. Before, there wasn’t a hospital. Now there is.” But he is not sure about what comes next. “When the Americans leave, it will become clear what will happen to Afghanistan. The Afghan Army can’t take their hands off the Taliban.”

In the end, he says, “The people will suffer. That’s what will happen. All of those people who work with the Americans, who work in the offices — when the Taliban comes, those people will be in danger, those people will be killed, because everybody wants power. Everyone will want revenge.” As for the Afghan government, he is of the same mind as the other vets. “Karzai and everyone, they all say, ‘We will defend your country. No one will attack here. Everyone will stand with us. The foreigners will help us,’ but on what does this depend? They say it depends on God … Everything depends on God. What he created, will be. But that’s all just talk. The tongue talks, but we’ll see what really happens.”

(MORE: Why President Karzai Might Not Be Up to the Job)

Possibly the most chilling comparison of all is made by Ahmad, the taxi driver, who reaches back into the history he has seen in Afghanistan, saying: “When the Soviet army left it was peaceful until the Soviet government stopped giving the Afghan communist government money. When the money stopped, the war started. Everyone only fights and works for money. People do everything for money.”

As dusk closed around Nek Mohammad’s village on the edge of Kunduz city, he invited us to stay for dinner, but he was worried about our security. “This is an Afghan village, so I can’t say anything. I don’t know what will happen here. Anything could happen. You’ll leave late and this place is unreliable for foreigners,” he says, mixing Dari and Russian. “I’m afraid. I’d be very happy for you to eat here, but …” Walking us out of the house in the gathering gloom, he recited a Russian saying, “We need to pull our claws out of here” — meaning, We need to run away from here, he explains. Says the old soldier: “I don’t know what’s going to happen next.”

47 comments
merilea
merilea

When we build hospitals in Afghanistan for that country's poor but Republicans in the U.S. want to avoid extending health insurance to THIS country's poor, something is seriously wrong.  We need to stop paying for other people and take care of ourselves first and foremost.  To hell with Afghanistan. 

Imagine how much money we could save by closing most of our 100s of useless military bases all over the world and bringing the troops home.  America First.

matthewH
matthewH

find him an kill him ,you just don't do what he did......

Richard Brinkton
Richard Brinkton

Hi Xfiler

Keep in mind that sensationalist occurrences happen in the US as well.  The media gets hold of one anecdote that may not even be a first person observation but rather a story passed through multiple people. This country has a culture of storytelling.  This probably did happen but it has never been the distinct policy of the Taliban.  Rather, a result a few.  Just like the US military has had a few bad apples that have stepped out of line and killed innocents without a second thought.  You are discussing bad people, not former governments.  There are also plenty of women in the US that have been murdered as a result of committing adultery.  A sad occurrence but not one unique to the Taliban.  Please open your perspective - It is easy to be mad about something and only see one side.  The challenge is understanding it in depth and having an informed opinion.

This is a country that has known only war for generations now. As stated in the article, currently you can kill 3 people and then ride off with no consequence. At least with the Taliban they had an effective and widespread government who could keep peace.

regards.

Richard Brinkton
Richard Brinkton

Agreed to a point, Zidar.  It is important to mention that the only real exit from Afghanistan will be negotiations with the Taliban to install a government with no overt west leanings and one which is capable of ruling this complicated country.

regards.

Richard Brinkton
Richard Brinkton

Dear Sir, 

I find your opinion poorly informed as it stinks of jingoism.  The taliban have never attacked outside of our country and do not plan to.  It is Al-Qaeda whom you reference.  There is a distinct difference - The Taliban have only protected their own country and defended their own civilians.  Al Qaeda came in from Saudi Arabia and other foreign countries with the imperative to train and strike out at US interests across the globe as retribution for US bases in what they consider their holy land.  The Taliban did not necessarily get along with Al Qaeda and were in negotiations with the US to hand them over before 9/11.  As for the Taliban, US culture may not jive with theirs but who are we to impose ourselves on a country on the other side of the planet.  Lets see things clearly, our main imperative in the middle east is to absorb the power vacuum to disable interests of our rivals such as Iran, Pakistan etc.  In turn, the US can then protect their interests of oil, Israel and rare earths.  Please scratch the surface and research this in further detail to develop a more informed opinion.  The only result of our presence there is that once we leave things will be further dilapidated.  The Taliban have been the only ones who have been able to govern this country even when considering the foreign influence by the CIA and ISI.  They reduced the poppy seed farms and things were on the upturn.  Until 9/11.

Regards.

Hardy Campbell
Hardy Campbell

Al Qaeda was and is a creature funded and controlled by the CIA. And they never attacked anyone outside Afghanistan either.

northernobserver
northernobserver like.author.displayName 1 Like

In retrospect the US should have backed the Soviet regime in Afghanistan, but hindsight is 20/20.

FreddyTamle
FreddyTamle

Those who make war don't know what war is like.

vintagegas
vintagegas

Folks, the Taliban aren't into creating wealth or leading the country away from anarchy. They are adequately funded by other Arab nation-states for staying away and pick up big cash  from opium sales etc to the "infidels". A thriving economy just ain't on their  to do list 

vintagegas
vintagegas

Its the opium biz for the Taliban boys and girls. Has been and will be. Low barriers to entry, big profits, worldwide customers. Jeez!

Guest
Guest

these wars are started and ran by politicians, not the military, look at ww2 - it was fought, won then over ... would Germany or Japan ever fight us again? Even Russia with all it's bluster has avoided that like the plague ... the point is these are lost before they begin because they are rich mens corp wars seeking the assets of those countries .. they do not resolve any of the real issues of the supposed conflict that brought them in ( Taliban, Paki support of the Taliban, etc - all sides make money on the deal) 

zidar
zidar

That we're spending $10 million per combatant to kill soldiers who can't even afford shoes says something about the quality of people leading the USA. The average American has no interest in the Middle East. The enemy isn't the Taliban, it's the people running our country. 

Pierce Collazo
Pierce Collazo

 Look dude, I actually served. Not only is your number pulled out of your ass, but you're completely out of touch with reality. Compare an insurgent to a professional soldier and you'll have a list of differences a mile long. You same people complaining about our expensive training and equipment would be the same people bawling if we went cheap and didn't care and just carpet bombed the place to oblivion. All that training and expensive toys allows us to do our jobs with as little impact on the locals as possible, and it shows when you compare collateral damage between the two forces.

Guest
Guest

the Taliban isnt the enemey? wow, are you like some sort of idiot or what? they shoot some poor woman 9 times because they said she committed adultry!!!! The Taliban are vermin and should be exterminated no matter what the cost MUSTAFA.

aarky
aarky

For the people who wring their hands about the woman who was murdered for infidelity, it hasn't been that many years since blacks were lynched in the US while a crowd cheered. A couple years ago an innocent black man was dragged to his death behind a pick up in Texas. You should also think of how many women have been blown to bits as collateral damage by 500 lb bombs.

Guest
Guest

it is remarkably ptitful that people as fucking stupid as you would compare the US to what the Taliban and Islam is doing to women...WORLDWIDE. The KKK,created by DEMS, the Old South RUN BY DEMS who lynched blacks was not a worldwide Jihad and a religion based on subjugation and intoleance of other relgions. so fuck you MUSTAFA, go hump your camel you asshole.

________________________________

From: Disqus <notifications@disqus.net>

To: xfiler93@yahoo.com

Sent: Monday, July 16, 2012 11:01 PM

Subject: [globalspin] Re: Hidden in Afghanistan: Soviet Veterans of a Previous War Compare and Tremble

aarky wrote, in response to xfiler93:

For the people who wring their hands about the woman who was murdered for infidelity, it hasn't been that many years since blacks were lynched in the US while a crowd cheered. A couple years ago an innocent black man was dragged to his death behind a pick up in Texas. You should also think of how many women have been blown to bits as collateral damage by 500 lb bombs. Link to comment</notifications@disqus.net>

paddyomalley
paddyomalley

You're right.  Southern Dimocrats have a miserable human rights record.  Thankfully, most of them are dead now and the legacies they left us, are going to prison or dead themselves 

Personally, collateral damage is of no concern to me, but if you want to fovus on it, be my guest. Why? Because the leadership of the countries giving haven to the Taliban and other Muslim extremists know what they need to do and won't.   I concede that we are at least 6, but probably 7-years past when total resolution of this should have been completed, but it is not because the military is often told to wage war, but the likes of Barney Frank want to tell them how.   

Elisa
Elisa

my co-worker's aunt makes $75/hr on the laptop. She has been without work for 8 months but last month her income was $14972 just working on the laptop for a few hours. Read more on this web site CAshLazy.com

paddyomalley
paddyomalley

The average American does have an interest in the Middle East:  We want the Ialamic vermin exterminated.  The enemy is the Talban and other Islamist militants:  They traveled thousands of miles and spent millions of dollars, just so they could kill 3000 innocent civilians BECAUSE THEY don't approve of our lifestyle, the movies we watch, and the religions we practice or don't.  If you don't approve of the country's leadership, there is an election in November if you're legal to vote. 

Hardy Campbell
Hardy Campbell

And you're gonna vote for the tooth fairy, right? Might as well, you believe all the other fairy tales you're told.

paddyomalley
paddyomalley

Gee Hardy.  What an intelligent rebuttal  .  .  .  it rates right down there with the other intellectual Frank Blunt.  The idea here is too attack the idea, the position, the issue, not the person.  I know, I know; that is a difficult concept to understand by someone still young enough to believe in the tooth fairy.  How about growing up a little and say things like, "Shut up, Dumbhead"! 

Frank N. Blunt
Frank N. Blunt

That is a stupid and delusional opinion as well as ignorant advice.

paddyomalley
paddyomalley

So Frank, you're a 19-year old punk, living at home with momma, and running your mouth over the internet?  I thought so punkboy.

zidar
zidar like.author.displayName 1 Like

For 25 years Israel pursued a policy I call "make my enemy the enemy of the United States." That policy bore fruit on 911. While I watched the coverage that day on TV one of the commentators said "The big winner here is Israel." And they got what they wanted. The US invaded first Iraq and then Afghanistan. Or was it the other way around? But the end result has been total chaos in the Middle East, which is just what Jerusalem ordered. And the stupid Americans paid for it all in money and blood. The hijackers on 911 were nearly all Saudi. So why didn't we invade Saudi Arabia? If you want to believe all that baloney about those people not approving of our lifestyle go ahead. We're spending $10 million dollars per combatant to kill soldiers who can't afford shoes. They kill our troops with crude, left over weapons. If we weren't there they wouldn't be a problem. More Israelis die from peanut allergy than from terrorism. They've succeeded in making their paranoia our paranoia. It's time to wise up. 

joey
joey

No you're right. They killed thousands of people just because of our lifestyle. Our bases in the Middle East, our blind support of Israel and its expansion policies, our constant attacks on targets that may or not be the bad guys and end up killing innocent people instead...

That had nothing to do with it. They just saw a few episodes of Fresh Prince and listened to a few Bill Maher stand ups. 

Christopher Fisher
Christopher Fisher

If you seriously believe terrorists attacked us on 9/11 because they "don't approve of our lifestyle" or "the movies we watch," I just feel sad for you for being so easily deluded by government propaganda.

ProwdLiberal
ProwdLiberal

This says it ALL

Life due to US/western help:

"Life has improved in the past 10 years but Tseuma — or Nek Mohammad as he was renamed after his conversion to Islam — senses grave danger ahead. “I’m afraid. Right now there are roads and there is light. "

Life due to Islamic Fundamentalists:

"But let’s see what happens down the road. Then there won’t be lights. Then the war will start,” he says. “People will be gobbled up everywhere. People will start killing each other. Then what will be here? Life will be here, but it will be bad.”"

Heterotic
Heterotic

Islam is evil and Afghanistan is a useless h-hole, and always will be. Ali-akbhar and all of that crap, useless.

Hardy Campbell
Hardy Campbell

For a useless a-hole we sure have expended a lot of lives and money on it. How much would it have cost if it were worth something?

Heterotic
Heterotic

 While Judaism and Christianity have stains on their past they have grown past it, Islam has not. Simply because islam stole from Jewish and Christian ideas does not mean that they are linked.

AngryBuddha
AngryBuddha

If Islam is evil then so is Judaism and Christianity.    They are the three legs of the monotheitic stool.

So yeah I agree.. ...  The monotheistic religions of the Jews, Christians and the Muslims have given this earth non stop war for far too many years.

Outlaw them all.

Abdul Mohammed
Abdul Mohammed

People like violence, hatred, war, etc. War will not end, people will fight due to this or that excuse even if all these monotheistic religions vanish.

dimukh
dimukh

Hope America has not frittered away its billions of dollars and more than 5000 precious lives during its eleven years of involvement in rebuilding Afghanistan and the country does not go back to post Soviet era anarchy with Taliban holding the rein.

Rgarza42
Rgarza42

This is more complecated than most people here in the US think . If we leave this country goes back to the Talibans and all the war and money spend would be lost in vain . If we stick around we will spend more money and more men .

JohnOBX
JohnOBX

Leave this infernal country to the barbarians and warlords.  You can't impose a democracy, or even basic civilization, on people who do not want it.  Witness the "Arab Spring":  when the people are fed up and ready for a change, it will happen organically.  Might take several hundred years, but at least it has a chance of sticking.  

Mamin Sibiryak
Mamin Sibiryak

But why Talliban doesn't need money? Does it mean that talliban war conception more efficient actually?

Richard Brinkton
Richard Brinkton

Hi Mamin, 

I believe the Talibs need money but it comes from a different source such as saudi sheiks, poppy fields and ISI(Pakistan CIA).  It is clear though that they do operate more efficiently because they are aware of the culture and have a clear view of operations.  The U.S. perspective is twice removed(culture and government) and their solution is to throw money around thinking it will ingratiate themselves  with afghanis.  But they only ingratiate themselves to the point of the next paycheck.  Literally, billions of dollars have disappeared into this country without a trace.   The Taliban have had to be more efficient for lack of money - this was one of their biggest challenges when fighting a CIA funded northern alliance.

Regards

ellis seawell
ellis seawell

 It means they don't get it from JP Morgan, like us...they get it by stealing everything the civilians have, and drug trafficking. Their war mongers wear turbans, ours wear suits. They should all go to hell.

Henry Major
Henry Major

So, the consensus is that if the money continues to flow, things will not fall apart. The people who worked with the Americans are targeted for death by the Taliban, giving them ample reason to stick with the present system, as long as money props it up. 

6thangle
6thangle

Afganistan an inaccessible land that will be the myth in future!!

Abdul Mohammed
Abdul Mohammed

Agree, Article says money flow should not stop irrespective of Barack or Mitt. I wonder how taliban manage, where does money come from!

charlotte emily
charlotte emily

Afghanistan has  mineral resources, natural gas, oil, copper, rare elements etc to be worth over $3 trillions. Afghanistan has 3.8 billion barrels of oil between Balkh and Jawzjan Province in the north of the country.

Amount of gold is found in the east and north of the country. 

Afghanistan also have worlds BIGGEST copper mine and world LARGEST deposits of lithium. http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06...

Afghanistan will soon be the biggest trade and energy in Central Asia, the region, in fact the world if the minerals resources are taken seriously.

This is also why the Soviet invaded Afghanistan. These natural resources has been there for long time, even before the Soviet invasion.

Kristin Johanssen
Kristin Johanssen

That lithium deposit might be the biggest in the world...Japan helped discover it and has been awarded the first excavation contract.