Why the Islamists Are Not Winning in Libya

Despite electoral victories in Egypt and Tunisia, the Islamists concede they have not won the parliamentary polls in Libya. Here's why

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Monique Jaques / Corbis

A Libyan woman exits the election booth with her child after casting her vote in the capital, Tripoli, on July 7, 2012

Libya seems relentlessly committed to proving the pessimists wrong. When last year’s revolution quickly evolved into a brutal civil war, the international community — and indeed many Libyans — warned of a quagmire down the road. “God is great” served as the rebel battle cry in the overthrow of Muammar Gaddafi, and the jihadists the dictator had once repressed rose to prominence as militia leaders and politicians in the vacuum left by his fall. Libya has always been a conservative and largely homogenous country; its population of 6 million is almost entirely Sunni Muslim. And that’s why, when Libyans went to vote last weekend in the first national elections since 1965, many observers assumed — with good reason — that if neighboring Tunisia and Egypt had elected Islamist governments in the aftermath of their revolutions, surely Libya — of all places — would follow suit. But in the past 18 months since the start of the Arab Spring, Libya has also served as the Arab world’s anomaly: waging war when others waged protests, overthrowing an entire regime rather than simply its strongman, and most recently, demonstrating remarkable stability despite the odds. As election results trickle in this week, Libya appears poised to buck yet another Arab Spring trend: the Islamist rise.

(PHOTOS: Libyans Turn Out for a Landmark Election)

Weeks after Egypt elected Mohamed Morsy, the first Islamist President in the country’s history — and just months after it elected a parliament dominated by Morsy’s Muslim Brotherhood — Libya has done the exact opposite. Early electoral results indicate that the liberal, secular-leaning National Forces Alliance of Mahmoud Jibril, the former wartime Prime Minister of the rebels’ National Transitional Council (NTC), has swept the majority of the country’s new parliament. Even Libya’s newly empowered Muslim Brotherhood has conceded that it failed to win a majority of the assembly’s 200 seats. And indeed, as the newly elected body moves to select a government to replace the NTC this month, Jibril may well become Libya’s first postrevolution Prime Minister.

All that may have some observers blinking and blindsighted in the Libyan sunlight, but analysts on the ground say it makes more sense than you might think. To start, many Libyans voted along tribal and familial lines, rather than according to ideological alliances. And analysts say that political inexperience may have fragmented support for the Islamists even as Jibril’s broad coalition, benefited from well-known personalities and parties that span the country’s tribes and cities.

But many also point out that Libya’s Muslim Brotherhood, as well as Islamist militia leaders like Abdel Hakim Belhaj — once a terror suspect tortured and extradited by the CIA, and now the head of one of the better-organized political parties — never had the popularity that their counterparts had in neighboring Egypt. After all, Egypt’s ousted authoritarian leader, Hosni Mubarak, had allowed the Brotherhood to cultivate charity networks and even run for parliament. It may have all been part of a decades-long scheme to convince Egyptians and Egypt’s allies that the country’s options for governance were limited to two extremes, but the end result was that the Egyptian Muslim Brotherhood was more prepared. Gaddafi on the other hand never tolerated the Islamists — or even weak political parties. Men with beards or political sympathies were so regularly monitored and rounded up that many Libyans said it was a crime to be religious or have opinions. Few bothered to try.

That rise from exile and repression may have given Libya’s Islamists an early boost when it came to political organizing during the uprising, but it also meant that they were starting at square one — just like everybody else. When TIME met with one of the Muslim Brotherhood’s senior leaders in Tripoli late last year, he admitted that he had no idea how many members the group even had inside the country. “Yesterday was the first time we met in Tripoli not underground,” Alamin Belhaj said shortly after the rebels took control of the capital. “The Brotherhood has been around for a long time, since 1951. But after Gaddafi came, it vanished.”

In the months since, as the Brotherhood and other parties have begun to cultivate a political following, rumors of Islamist funding coming from Arabian Gulf states like Qatar have damaged the group’s nascent image. Posters and protests have sprung from popular opposition to a perceived financial intervention. Libyans may have accepted military assistance from NATO and Qatar in their struggle to defeat Gaddafi, many say, but they’re unwilling to accept a foreign hand in their postrevolution politics.

As for their neighbors? Some say Egypt and Tunisia have provided useful but often counterintuitive examples. Both countries held their first postrevolution parliamentary elections months ahead of Libya. And many political analysts thought the Islamist victories in Tunisia and Egypt would give Libya’s Islamists a surge of popularity and confidence. Instead, those victories may have served as a warning. “I think among a lot of people, after [Muslim Brotherhood candidate] Mohamed Morsy got elected in Egypt, they kind of looked around and wanted to show a sign of independence,” says one foreign NGO worker who has spent the length of the transition in Libya. Libyans saw the Brotherhood rising on a regional level, and the group’s leaders in Egypt and Tunisia even spoke of regional unity. To some, the vote against the Islamists ultimately delivered a reaffirmation of Libya’s autonomy, he says: “That ‘We’re not part of your empire.'”

Jibril, whose coalition stands to lead the new government, has weathered his share of harsh criticism as well. Forging a new government under his leadership will not be easy. Jibril served as an economic adviser to Gaddafi’s regime during its last four years in power, and he resigned at the start of the uprising. Some of Jibril’s harshest critics, most notably people from within the NTC, have accused him of running a deeply corrupt and inefficient transition, and many also say his ties to the ex-regime make him an unreliable pick to move the country forward. In the brief campaign period ahead of last weekend’s vote, many of Jibril’s opponents tried to paint him as a vestige of the Gaddafi era — and a “secular” one at that.

But experts point to the fact that Jibril’s coalition was never decidedly secular in its definition as another reason for his victory. Jibril and other non-Islamist party leaders have said that Islamic law should remain an important source of legislation in the new Libya. And Hana Galal, a member of the country’s National Council of Human Rights and a law professor at Benghazi University, says that despite her mixed feelings about Jibril, his coalition probably beat out the Islamists because it was the most diverse and moderate-sounding option on the ballot. “The coalition has different ideologies, different groups and different personalities,” she says. “It’s not just one ideology, so that may be what made them attractive.”

For better or worse, the NGO official in Tripoli points out, it’s also impossible to discount the national recognition that Jibril earned as a leader during the Libyan revolution. “He was the wartime Prime Minister, and he got NATO involved,” the official says. The fact that Jibril successfully lobbied for international assistance when the rebels so desperately needed it was an achievement that resonated with a lot of Libyans, he says.

Still, it remains entirely hazy what the new parliament will look like, or how well it will be able to appoint a government to unite the country. With no previous local experience in democracy, and many members elected along tribal or family lines, the legislature is bound to include dozens of people whose priorities and politics have been previously unknown on the national level. Galal and many others in the eastern city of Benghazi also worry that those names could include a disproportionate number of old-regime affiliates elected under Jibril’s umbrella group, or that the new government could favor the development of the western region just as Gaddafi’s government did. It was that fear that drove protests, boycotts, and even a few violent clashes in the country’s east on and before election day. And observers say it will likely drive sporadic violence in the weeks and months ahead. But election officials say the turnout was still impressively high at 65% — far higher than in neighboring Egypt — and election monitors have said the process was generally clean. It’s an imperfect experiment in democracy, says Galal. “But at the end of the day, it’s still a step in the right direction.”

32 comments
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Jim O'Neill
Jim O'Neill

I find it interesting that many in the West fear a Muslim country having Islamic law but at the same time, in the West, especially in the United States, Christians try to influence law and impose their views on the rest of society. 

My point is this:  A nation's laws, to some extent, will be influenced by the religions of that country.  It is going to happen and should be expected.

I also think, whoever comes to power in these first elections will have a very difficult job of putting together a government that satisfies most of their citizens.  The Muslim Brotherhood in Tunisia and Egypt will probably lose some favor as time passes because it will be unable to meet all of the expectations of the people.  By the same token, Jibril will probably lose some support too,  for the same reasons.

In time, the dust will settle and after a few elections, the best anyone can hope for is that their experiment in democracy is successful.  Look at the United States, after all these years we have a constipated Congress that does not allow anything to get accomplished.  Can we expect more of these people who are just starting out on their trip down the democratic road?  I do not think so.

Dina Sadek
Dina Sadek

You seem to be missing the point.  There is a huge difference between being Muslim and being run by Islam views as a government. Unlike Christianity, Islam is much more of an ideology that seeks to impose strict, almost middle age type laws on the people - and worse laws on minority none Muslims. Look around the world. Every country run by Islamist governments (shariah imposing) are some of the worst human rights violators in the world.  You think Christianity poses it's values here? there is a difference between christian groups here voting against gay marriage (which is not all of Christians for sure), and Islamist run countries executing you people for being gay, for adultery, for apostasy, etc.   Not all Muslims believe all of the quran and not all Muslims want their government imposing Islamic law that is why they didn't elect the Muslim Brotherhood.

If you think having an Islamist run country is a pass to democracy than you're clearly ignorant of what Islam is.

Joelk
Joelk

Good points.  And can someone PLEASE tell me why Homosexuals and feminist groups are the first to defend Islamists and attack Western Christian beliefs.  Are homosexuals and feminists feeding the tens of thousands of children starving in East Africa right now?  I think not.

GriffinElisa
GriffinElisa

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Joelk
Joelk

Your points are good. Libya is almost 97% Sunni Islamist. Islamists didn’t win? Of course they won, the Muslim Brotherhood lost. They (the western media) lied when the Arab Spring began saying the protestors in Cairo were secular doctors, lawyers, IT techs.  To say that Islamists lost in a country that is 97% Islamist (Wikipedia changed the demographics for Libya in the last 48 hours from 100% to 97%) is just a media lie.

They will have an Islamist democracy which may or may not include elements of Sharia Law and will most likely continue to repress women and religious freedom.

The failed democracy of the U.S. is another story.  It is coming mostly from arrogance and complacency. 

Stewart Platt
Stewart Platt

 So Wikipedia is also in on this grand-ridiculous sounding conspiracy? That's very stup.... interesting. Obviously the people elected to office had Islamic beliefs, but they weren't hard-line Islamists. It's a question of Degrees.

Joelk
Joelk

Wikipedia is edited by the public, indicating more are informing themselves.  The article title does nothing to distinguish “hardline” and the article itself does very little.  As I said Mahmoud Jibril’s supporters claim he is no less “hardline” than the Muslim Brotherhood.  Tell me how Islamists can lose in a democratic election of a country containing 97% Islamists.  These same reporters claimed the Egyptian revolution was a secular movement led by "doctors" and "lawyers" and "IT Techs".   Just be honest, that's all.  They also said during the Cairo revolution that the Muslim Brotherhood were moderate.  What changed?

Joelk
Joelk

These stories are simply a bald-faced lie.  Libya is nearly 100% Islamist.  Just because the Muslim Brotherhood didn't win, doesn’t mean Islamists are not in power.  Mahmoud Jibril’s supporters said themselves, “Is he less Islamist than they?  Does he not fast, does he not pray five times a day?”  Islamists won because there are only Islamists in Libya.  There was a handful of Jews there in the 60’s who fled after the war.  Stop the lies.

Conrad Schweizerhof
Conrad Schweizerhof

Funny how we are always told about those "radical muslims" and then we wage a proxy  war through them to overthrow the guy who is probably the strongest "anti-radical muslim" in the middle east... its all bull****

deepwater805
deepwater805

Libyans fought and died for their freedom, and don't want to turn over their newly formed government to islamists who will simply take away their new freedoms.

fozzydabear
fozzydabear

I lost family during the Iranian Revolution. Good for the Libyans but I give it 50/50 that in two years their government will be controlled by militant Islamists. They are a violent death cult. Their religion does not hesitate to mix cruel punishment with strict law.

clernfimmel891
clernfimmel891

A human instinct that has helped the species to survive,  the herd mentality, the desire for the safety of being told what to do; it's sad how religious fanatics exploit this human frailty.

Christopher Kidwell
Christopher Kidwell

It's not a human frailty. Many people would be fine to think on their own and live on their own, however they are told that they 'wouldn't survive that way' by the schools and various other people from their parents to.... just about anyone you can name.

Yousef Darrat
Yousef Darrat

It is a shame to see such comments... it is obvious that people in the west do not know anything about the people living in the middle east, all they talk about and focus on is Islam...Islam Islam...and they forget that people in that region are looking for freedom and peace  wether it is through politicians wearing the disguise of Islam(i.e muslim brotherhood) as in Egypt and Tunisia or via liberal politicians as in Libya...just do not make it too complicated...and do not worry Shariah law will not be applied in those countries and time will prove that!

Jim O'Neill
Jim O'Neill

Just a point of interest.  You used the word "wether" in your post.  For your information, a "wether" is a  castrated male goat; A castrated male sheep.

I know it was just a slip but I found it amusing.

akahen
akahen

You must be out of your mind.  I have come from a Muslim country and I have lived under Islamic Rule.  You seriously have no clue if you think Islam as a political party is not a problem. 

Having said that, I am proud of the Libyan for making the right decision.  Egypt and Tunsinia will pay a very high price for this.  If they have any doubt, look at Lebanon (Hezbollah) and Iran. 

Good lucky trying to get those guys out of power once they take power. 

JPalm
JPalm

I hope they wipe each other out!

Guppy101
Guppy101

We should have nothing to do with these people.  Let Muslims figure out their own problems. If they decide to kill each other, so be it.

dcazal01
dcazal01

No oil country is in good standing political or socially even economically many of them are broke. Oil is a curse they will be fighting for the oil instead of working for the country

6thangle
6thangle

But you dont say the reason! .. because of the big western oil amp; mining companies there is no stability or prosperity in greater Africa 

Guppy101
Guppy101

  You will find that writing an article on " How Islamists are not winning in Libya" will have the opposite effect. Articles like this actually encourage "pro Islamist" movements.  

   They will be viewed as  Western  propaganda .  Journalists who write these articles really should get their " heads checked ".

beowulf20
beowulf20

As another person commented before.  Sharia law in the legislative system is not secularistic at all in nature.

Mriordon
Mriordon

Only in the la la land at the Time will liberals govern Libya.  In two years Libya will be an Islamist state with sharia law or 100 different states in revolution.

amanuenensi
amanuenensi

You think ?

Libya was and is already an Islamist state with Sharia law and always will be.Like Dubai -  Tunisia - Algeria etc etc.  There is nothing wrong with a country being an Islamist state with Sharia law - what matters is personal freedom inside that system.  Dubai is a fine place to live - an Islamist state with Sharia law and richer safer and better than many parts of the US. Anyway you say Islamist like its a bad thing....?What does that make you - an Islamophobe I guess.Thats a bit old fashioned you know - in the 1800 it was Irishphobia, Chinaphobia in the 1900's and then Germano and Japophobia then Vietophobia - why do you think there is always someone to be frightened of and to go to war with....?   Could it be a mindset.......?

Robert Todd Wise
Robert Todd Wise

As it should be.  It is time that the governments in the Middle East and North Africa reflect the MAJORITY of the people that are there, and not people with money and Western influence.  It is disgusting.

akahen
akahen

Robert,

seriously people like you make me laugh.  Do you have any idea what you are promoting?!  Do you even remotely have any clue as to what you are talking about?

As I said before, I come from an Islamic country and I have lived under that rule.  You are simply promoting "Public Hanging", "execution of Gays", absolute and total destruction of women rights, absolute violation of minority rights, and on top of that, you are creating a force that is simply going to start taking over your country and your laws.

Majority is not always the right decision.  Majority must have the political matureness to handle democracy.  Seriously man, how much of Liberal B.S have you read to seriously think that Islamisim and Islamic Government are good thing for Africa? 

One they take over power, it would take decades and I mean decades to get rid of their rule because they will simply lable someone as "enemy of G-d" and kill them. 

I have seen that in my own country. 

Once again, thank you for your stupidity!!

Stewart Platt
Stewart Platt

 Do you remotely have any clue what you are promoting? It's a clearly unsustainable and illogical set-up. The leadership needs to reflect the people, regardless of how much you dislike the outcome.

Christopher Kidwell
Christopher Kidwell

What you miss, akahen, is that the 'majority' in the west is not always right either AND that we have some things in America that are just as onerous as anything in extreme Islamist countries.

John Whitehurst
John Whitehurst

You,

are the only poster who has an idea of what you are talking about. The rest are just posters with no knowledge, stupidity is correct.. Hollywood dictates Anerican knowledge about foreign counties through Bull S  hh ii t movies. so yes stupid.

solidanatomy
solidanatomy

everybody know Sunni's dont see shia as muslim and i bet you from IRAN