Viewpoint: Why Was the Biggest Protest in World History Ignored?

Ten years ago today, the world saw what was by some accounts the largest single coordinated protest in history. But why was the antiwar movement ignored?

  • Share
  • Read Later
Alessia Pierdomenico / Reuters

People march outside Rome's Colosseum to protest war in Iraq on Feb. 15, 2003

Ten years ago today, the world saw what was by some accounts the largest single coordinated protest in history. Roughly 10 million to 15 million people (estimates vary widely) assembled and marched in more than 600 cities: as many as 3 million flooded the streets of Rome; more than a million massed in London and Barcelona; an estimated 200,000 rallied in San Francisco and New York City. From Auckland to Vancouver — and everywhere in between — tens of thousands came out, joining their voices in one simple, global message: no to the Iraq war.

I was among the antiwar contingent that swarmed Manhattan’s midtown on Feb. 15, 2003, a wintry Saturday. We spread across miles of city blocks, trundling past abandoned police barricades as we tried to inch toward the U.N., where 10 days earlier then Secretary of State Colin Powell had presented what we now know was illusory intelligence about Iraq’s supposed weapons of mass destruction. The multitudes in New York were diverse and legion. There were anarchists and military veterans, vociferous students (I was then a freshman in college) and a motley cast of graying peaceniks — many, including one grandmother memorably puttering along in a wheelchair, had opposed American involvement in Vietnam. And there were myriad others: a band of preppy suburbanites with banners announcing themselves — “Soccer Moms Against the War” — musicians, street artists and workaday New Yorkers. My uncle, a doctor with medical practices in both the U.K. and India, had flown in for the demonstration and was just another face in a vast crowd.

(MORE: Refighting the Last Wars)

The overwhelming feeling on New York’s streets, despite the grimness of the NYPD and the bite of that February afternoon, was one of unity and hope. Word was seeping in about the scale of the demonstrations elsewhere and it was hard not to bask in our sense of collective purpose. An article in the New York Times would soon trumpet, “There are two superpowers: the United States and world public opinion.” Here’s Sofia Fenner, then a high school senior in Seattle (now a doctoral candidate at the University of Chicago, currently doing dissertation work in Cairo): “I was just proud to stand with all those people, proud that we as dissenting Americans were not staying home while what seemed like the whole world took up our cause.” In Los Angeles, a pregnant Laila Lalami walked a mile with fellow protesters down Hollywood Boulevard. “I thought, ‘Hundreds of thousands of people across the U.S. are making their voices heard. Surely they can’t be ignored,’” the Moroccan-American novelist told TIME this week. “But they were.”

And there it was. We failed. Slightly more than a month later, the U.S. was shocking and awing its way through Iraqi cities and Saddam Hussein’s defenses and bedding in — though it didn’t know it yet — for a near decadelong occupation. The protests, which by any measure were a world historic event, were brushed aside with blithe nonchalance by the Bush Administration and a rubber-stamp Congress that approved the war. The U.N.’s Security Council was bypassed, and the largely feckless, acquiescent American mainstream media did little to muffle Washington’s drumbeats of war.

(PHOTOS: War/Photography by Geoff Dyer)

A decade later, it’s hard to understand why the display of people power on Feb. 15 proved so ineffectual. The gun-slinging righteousness of post-9/11 America has given way to a more humble West, burdened by unwinnable wars, financial crises and a semipermanent funk of political dysfunction. Moreover, the explosion of social media in recent years has enabled previously obscure episodes of dissent to reach and reshape the global conversation. Protests matter again. Public spaces — from Cairo’s Tahrir Square to Madrid’s Puerta del Sol to New York’s tiny Zuccotti Park — became sites of a renewed democratic vitality. Yet the mass antiausterity protests that have rocked Europe or even the largest actions of Occupy Wall Street have not been able to match the scale of what took place on Feb. 15, 2003.

There will be time yet to relitigate the justifications behind the U.S.-led invasion of Iraq, 10 years after the fact. The ranks of the war’s cheerleaders have thinned in the intervening years, with a host of journalists and pundits in the U.S. offering their mea culpas for supporting the war so unquestioningly. A dictator is gone, but more than 100,000 Iraqis are dead, as well as 4,804 U.S. and coalition soldiers. The U.S. spent nearly a trillion dollars on a pre-emptive war that didn’t need to happen and a nation-building exercise that has achieved only fragile, uncertain gains. Far from a “mission accomplished,” the American adventure in Iraq has become a cautionary tale of hubris and poor planning. It’s clear the West’s current reluctance to take more direct action in ending Syria’s bloody civil war is, in part, a legacy of the U.S. experience in Iraq, where the disintegration of a regime spawned a whole new phase of sectarian slaughter and chaos.

But there’s no satisfaction in looking back and saying, “I told you so” — not with the blood that has been spilled and continues to be spilled. That profound solidarity I felt 10 years ago has faded into a form of resignation and sadness. In a region as complex and politically volatile as the Middle East, fixed moral positions are difficult. “Our demands were simple [on Feb. 15], and we were right,” says Fenner, the University of Chicago doctoral candidate. “What I didn’t realize at the time was that when the war went ahead, nothing would ever be so simple again.”

MORE: Is Iraq Falling Apart?

100 comments
ElJaFiMa
ElJaFiMa

I don't know.  I think nothing happens for *no reason* as ever action has an equal and opposite reaction..  Would you feel as strongly as you do that our media is biased and corrupt if there had been fair coverage of that protest (though, I somehow doubt even with fair coverage, it would've put even a tiny dent in the ultimate outcome) ??  It seems to me, that our media hyper-focuses on certain things due to money.  This is becoming more well known, and many people don't like it.  It takes something wrong happening to them, generally, for people to get rather stubborn about wishing to really change things.  In other words, I think small injustices sew seeds of discord that can ultimately eventually effect change.   You're lucky it wasn't something horrific.  Vote for people who are true, vote for people who aren't corporate shills, get out on the streets and social media and grassroots efforts can ultimately effect changes.  The changes may be small, particularly at first, but change is like that.  


The up and coming generation is smarter, less judgmental and bigoted, more empathetic, and more tech savvy than the last.    Talk to them.  Tell them what you think.  They may just listen.  Don't give up.  :)

FailingDream
FailingDream

I was there freezing my butt off too... It was ignored because there was a concerted effort by the NYPD to break the protest up, by diverting the incoming mass of protesters into smaller groups on different blocks. They were successfully sued some years later - again, with barely any media coverage. 


I remember coming home after the protest that day, eager to see the news report for what surely was the largest protest that I had ever seen, or been to, in my entire life in NYC.... There was MAYBE a 5 minute coverage on CNN. That was pretty much it. Aerial footage from CNN over the protest that day proved the effect of the NYPD to be a success - it was one of the smaller groups of protesters that were purposefully separated from the main march, to make the protest look smaller than it was. I've often looked back on that day with regret; we should've been more violent. Had the media been forced to report with some significant attention to the actual scale of those NYC protests, I think more of the country would've been shaken from the prevailing false assumption of the time - that those who were protesting were only a small "unpatriotic" bunch who didn't really reflect the will of the American people at large. Peaceful protests are not always the ideal... A lesson learned too late.

ameer.jabril
ameer.jabril

@FailingDream U would have only given the nypd an excuse to become more violent. Nothing more. And the police state would have gotten even stronger then it already is.

TomEinhardNilsen
TomEinhardNilsen

watch this doku ... "The four horsemen" ..well made, and tells you what you need to know about what you are talking about ..Some of it ;)

HikaruSulu
HikaruSulu

If it was Ignored, wouldn't that just be a result of a split in the media. Those that influenced Americans to ignore the protest and those that stirred people to protest. Since everything people see is filtered by the media any 'Grass-Roots' actions on the subjects chosen by the media are the direct result of the given stimulation.

oroborus777
oroborus777

You can have millions of protesters but it won't matter until you know where to protest.  Sit down strikes, work stoppages, on a mass and perpetual scale, for starters.  You hit them where it hurts:  their wallets.  And then you form a political movement, gather resources, endorse candidates who aren't afraid to stand up to the military-industrial-security complex and it's Washington cronies, or back your own candidates.  There is every key ingredient for a Peace Spring in the US as there was for the Arab Spring.  Technology, numbers, leaders, etc.  Make it happen, people.

RickHunter
RickHunter

The problem with the protest is that it wasn't backed by the big money political establishment.  Had ONE influential politician joined in, it would have been more successful because the media would have been on it night and day.  As it was, at the time, if you were against the war, you weren't American enough (according to Darth Cheney and his apprentice Lord Bush) therefore were considered a traitor and not worthy of the office they held.  And, of course, the politicians do whatever they have to do to stay in power.

georges_kanoute
georges_kanoute

After reading your article, I'm getting one lesson out of it: Dictatorships don't let you talk and "Democracies" let you talk as much as you want because they know they don't have to listen, so next time you go protest, make sure to riot properly, then they'll have to listen. 

judithsj
judithsj

Thanks for your article.  It's important to remember.  I was one of the greying peaceniks marching with Quakers in San Francisco after having marched against the Viet Nam War in the '60's.  I believe our challenge is not to succumb to resignation.  Take heart and remember Margaret Mead, "Never doubt that a small group of committed people can change the world.  Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has."  Yes, the rules change, but I don't believe the sentiment does.


atpcliff
atpcliff

It would do better now because of social media and a more pervasive internet: More people would have been organized to protest, and more people would have heard about it....it would have had more influence now via the internet...."big media" is now no longer as important.

MollyCruz
MollyCruz

I have committed to the plan that if we invade Iran, we won't do it with my money. So I won't pay my taxes in that event. I suspect this passive resistance would make quite an impression on those planning to spend us into poverty to make a point, even if simply threatened by a committed faction of those who don't wish to pay for another suicide mission without a goal simply withheld their taxes. 

jerry48
jerry48

1/ " the biggest protest in world history " ????  the guy doesn't seem to know or remember the world wide protests against the war in Viet Nam !!! ( or, by " world " does he mean the american world only ? 

2/ OBAMA was right in helping to get rid of Gaddafi .  BUSH lied ! the invasion of Iraq was wrong and cost thousands of lives ! ( where are the weapons of mass destruction ?? )

3/ and YES Obama is right when he uses drones against enemies ! after all they are weapons and I don't see why we wouldn't use them ! ( these terrorists will always hide behind innocent civilians anyway ! )

4/ Winston CHURCHILL said " It has been said that Democracy is the worst form of government except all the others that have been tried "

so YES America is the biggest Democracy in the World, even if it is not perfect and makes mistakes sometimes !


carterpeterson24
carterpeterson24

The Iraq war had the unintended consequence of making Iran the hegemonic power in the region. I call it 'W's folly.'

bombeer
bombeer

The US is a huge propaganda machine... it can even drown out the obvious if it chooses to.

FdfdAsaa
FdfdAsaa

The Sheep love being lied into wars and about wars: WW1 (Lusitania) , WW2 (Pearl Harbour – prior knowledge) , Cold War ( Gladio) , Vietnam ( the fake Tonkin incident) , Iraq (wmds) , Afghanistan ( 9/11 Tim Osman , Al-CIA -da ?!? ) , Libya , Syria ( both attacked covertly with NATO backed “rebels” ie. more lies ).


So now the herd of mind controlled uninformed programmed sheep salivate over the lie of the Iran threat .

Why are sheep so dangerously mal-informed ? 
Ans: The dangerously grossly mal-informing MSM .

Why does the MSM grossly mislead us ?
Ans: Because thats how our owners , the banking corporate monied establishment ( the same ones who own MSM ) want it .

Why do they want it like this ? 
Ans: So military piracy and murder can go unexposed !

'The obvious is what is never seen until someone expresses it with simplicity' - Khalil Gibran

ameer.jabril
ameer.jabril

@FdfdAsaa got proof to back up ur conspiracy claims. Cause as someone from a Muslim majority nation they only thing i found surprising about 9-11 is that it didn't happen sooner. Yea much of the Muslim world doesn't like u in case u still haven't noticed.

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

It was ignored by the media for the same reason that hormonal teenagers are tuned out.

Look, those protesters could shout, scream, and gather in large groups for a sustained period of time.  Big, freaking deal.

Did those protesters actually propose any kind of sensible policy?  None that I remember.

All they did was whine about a policy that was not going to change.

Their time would have been better spent working at their jobs (or finding one), or getting more educated about foreign affairs.

With grand displays like the protests, it's no wonder that America is the laughing stock of the globe.

Just look at our infantile youth.

FdfdAsaa
FdfdAsaa

if the mass media doesn't cover it , it doesn't exist 

m3brooklyn
m3brooklyn

JohnDavid, the article is poorly worded. Although nobody ever agrees on crowd counts, there are multiple sources estimating the crowd over 200k in Manhattan AND 200k in San Francisco. The total for the US that day was at least a million, with hundreds of communities participating, and it is quite safe to say that not every person who was against the war showed up at the protests in person.

Regardless, nobody argues that this was the largest single protest in U.S. history, and it didn't even result in additional Congressional hearings or efforts to verify the facts, much less a change in policy. That's worth noting if you believe in the idea of a democratic government accountable to its people. If the content of this protest doesn't match up with your views, try imagining this happening with something that you'd be willing to go to the streets for – an outright repeal of the Second Amendment, for example (don't mean to put words in your mouth, just trying to paint the picture). You'd want to feel the government heard you, even if your views didn't prevail, right?

rorywong654
rorywong654

Wake up Americans,you guys have been lived in a failed demoncracy system for a long time and even didn't realised .No matter who is the president,the system is on auto piloted.THe system is tightly built around a War,Wall Street and Media propaganda machine.Both party's policy appears different and in conflict.FAULT.In deed when you look into the administration with their advisors in all level under both party,they share the same personnal pool.No matter who is in charge,the policy will be the same with slight fine tune.It is more clearly show in both Houses,a lot of the senators or representatives are there for life 'til drop dead.

dankwax_com
dankwax_com

Violent murderers only understand violence. Standing around complaining in mass does nothing to deter psychopaths.

NTX
NTX

We learned that lesson in the 60s. And, you're saying the only road in this situation, is for violence to conquer violence?  Does that not allude to two wrongs making a right?   Or does that mean, the only way to reach the violent is to fight them at their own game?  By fighting?  And by fighting if wrong, becomes right if it is (in your opinion) the only recourse that will have an effect on the wrong?  Is there no higher road?

DonMcCoy
DonMcCoy

JohnDavid...It's because Time is just ANOTHER rag in the tank for the Dems...nothing new here..

JohnDavidDeatherage
JohnDavidDeatherage

Is this author serious?  According to the author, 10 - 15 million people protested worldwide and 200,000 Americans participated. The population of the US was 291,000,000 and 200,000 protested.  That's less than 1 protester for every 10,000 Americans.  

Congress & the President should have changed policies because 1 in every 10,000 felt the policy was wrong?

Time.com, have your editors and fact checkers gone on strike?  Is this what passes for journalism?



rt_1_spirit
rt_1_spirit

Lord Obama has Killed American Citizens with drones and the Liberals all want to still bash Bush. Wake the Hell up. Where were you when Obama raped Libya? Wasn't he going to close Guantanamo Bay? Instead he signs the NDAA. This Illegal Alien is using a False Social security number and has manufactured both his Birth certificate and draft registration. When did he assume his current name and where is the legal document? There is no law in this country because all you ignorant people refuse to follow the Constitution. There is no fixing abomination. Nothing short of a full fledged Revolution will fix this mess. The first step is to demand the Truth and quit letting these criminals lie to us. The next Protest should be this 4th of July in Philadelphia when we declare this Government Illegal as our Founding Fathers once did. We have ignored our true heritage far too long. The only way to bring people together is to have a National examination of our Government compared to the Law. Which is the Constitution. Then maybe the people will understand we are not Free at all.

The Revolution is On.

Game over Bankers, and

your bought and paid for politicians.

We the People are the only ones who can change things.

Let's start now.

FrankShifreen
FrankShifreen

The way demonstrators were treated upsets me to this day. The police and those in charge,  Bloomberg was mayor,  were abominable. The constitutional rights of demonstrators were not respected. We were herded like cattle in stockyards. 600,000 thousand dead! The way Republicans treated Hagel, one of their own party. I am furious and will never get over it. The laughter and arrogance of the police. We were right. Damn it.


auronlu
auronlu

It's always ignored. I was in the March on Washington in May 1993, where organizers were carefully sending around people with clipboards to collect the names and addresses of all participants that we could present to news media, since the last time such an event had been organized, the Park Service "estimated" the crowds from the air at less than half the size of the actual number of people who attended.


It happened again. News media barely covered it, and we had over a million signatures. I WAS THERE. I have the photos.


A smaller event, to be sure, but it shows just how much goes on that gets ignored.

JenniferHathaway
JenniferHathaway

"... it’s hard to understand why the display of people power on Feb. 15 proved so ineffectual."

 In the words of Colonel Potter [who was banned from the airways with the rest of the cast of MASH at about the same time], BULL HOCKEY. 

We know EXACTLY why the anti-war protests were ignored- and it was for the same reason that our staunch ally of years, France, was vilified to the point of rednecks pouring out bottles of wine- the propaganda mills that had once been the pride of our nation, our Free Press, had been suborned for the political agenda of a crooked Halliburton-owned administration.

And it is for the same reason that myriad warnings about the impending bank collapse of 2008 were ignored, seeing the citizens of this country brought to their knees. It is because multinational corporations have zero interest in providing accurate information to the citizens of the world when it might conflict with their efforts at securing an ever-greater proportion of the world's wealth for themselves.

Perhaps the author can help to effect change from within. That would be nice.
Read more: http://world.time.com/2013/02/15/viewpoint-why-was-the-biggest-protest-in-world-history-ignored/#ixzz2L1krEg5O

Goop
Goop

I wouldn't take such a dim view, it was not just a noble cause, it is imperative to speak out while you still can. Especially if that moment unites like-minded individuals globally! Try to see all the levels of positivity such an outspoken gathering creates and not look back thinking one side won and one side lost; everybody lost but that's why we have to stand up again next time.

ZweiStein
ZweiStein

They were ignored because they were THEY.  They were not cohesive.  Organizers were not on the same page and had no clue as to the motivators which will influence elected politicians.  They did not understand how to generate political fear.  Fear of being recalled, not re-elected or held in contempt by their own constituencies.  It needs to be done with ONE voice...ONE message... ONE theme.  Plus (and this is big) THEY did not know how to use the media.

MistStilipec
MistStilipec

Februar 4-7, 2013, 300 Nobodies descended on Washington D.C. with one mission: to inform Congress and the press about overwhelming evidence of government and judicial corruption inside American courtrooms, most especially the loss of civil rights and parental rights, and yet not a single member of press nor Congress attended our speeches eventhough they were held in the Capitol Visitor's Center.  And while this event has little to do with the war, the point is that this story os of interest to every American family and yet it did not make news.  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvbRfbI6Fhk&feature=youtu.be

PeterFoelsche
PeterFoelsche

Yes -- hindsight is 20-20.

Let's forget about everybody who claimed that the USA wanted to go to war about oil...

But that people in Iraq and Afghanistan and Pakistan and north africa and ...

are unable to create a stable civil society or government was not known before

(when did Sam Harris point out that we could only hope for benign dictators for every Islamic Country?).

As far as I remember the war in Iraq was pretty cheap in point of view of lives -- American and Iraq.

What was expensive was the post-war-period.

The period after the fall of Nazi Germany and Imperial Japan as pretty easy for american soldiers, wasn't it?

Nobody drew any conclusions regarding this difference?!

PeluMaad
PeluMaad

Why was the theft of two presidential elections ignored? Why aren't Katherine Harris and Ken Blackwell rotting in Leavenworth still?

PeterFoelsche
PeterFoelsche

This article reminds me of Christopher Hitchens showing one of his digits to Bill Maher's Audience...

DeweySayenoff
DeweySayenoff

Why was the biggest protest in history ignored?  Two reasons and ONLY two reasons: Democracy and stupid people.

Democracy, unfettered and unrestricted, allows anyone to vote in the U.S.  Well, any citizen, at least.  No other qualification is required.  No provision that they have contributed to society.  No requirement that they know what the hell they're voting on.  Just a birth certificate and a pulse.  No brains required.

Now, this sounds great until one realizes that those "citizens" are just anyone.  "Just anyone" means they're normal people.  Half of all people are BELOW AVERAGE in IQ, ability, reason and just about every other factor that may influence a vote.  They're gullible.  They're easily misled.  They can't think for themselves. (Not won't, though there are many who won't, but most who screw over the rest of us just plain aren't genetically able to use their heads to make a cogent choice when they vote.)

So Democracy combined with the normal stupidity of people is why it was ignored.  People were stupid enough to let Bush steal the election by not getting rid of the electoral college a long time ago.  People were stupid enough to give in to "rag-head racism" and let the United States go to war against a country which had done nothing to the United States.  People were stupid enough to let the government blow the fear of the bogeyman called the "terrorist" so out of proportion that they'd let it violate international law and justify it by saying it was for "our security" because they said Iraq had weapons that could hurt us despite the fact they didn't.

While people are allowed to vote without having demonstrated any other ability or consideration for their country (civic service, military service, some kind of commitment to the country as a whole), there will never be any significant change.  The "powers that be" have had generations of experience in manipulating enough sub-average and average people to stay in power pretty much forever.  And while a prior demonstration of consideration for one's country isn't a guarantee that someone will think about their vote before voting, the odds favor it.  After all, if you've devoted years of your life to your country, you're far more likely to think about how your vote may impact it.

WadsworthOnion
WadsworthOnion

The question is how to put the people in power, and extricate the elite.

MKE.Dave
MKE.Dave

I'd be curious to see a comparison between Iraq and, say, Egypt in a few years. In Iraq, we had the unpopular war that "lost" for so many popular reasons but created a potentially stable foundation on which government and industry could be built. In Egypt, we had the glorious Arab Spring take hold and topple the government. The people acted as a whole without the help of an army! Americans tweeted their support! Mission Accomplished, everyone! Except what's happening in Egypt now? Suddenly the Arab Spring is out of the news and people don't care that nothing has changed in Egypt. Maybe if we tweet more, they'll see the errors of their ways.

GuðmundurSteinarJónsson
GuðmundurSteinarJónsson

The protests were not for anything they were against something. The coalition that assembled for the protests was the normal coalition against pretty much everything. Every single banner was against the war and something else. Declaring that issue B is more important than issue A which you are protesting against is a good sign that you can be ignored. 

The coalition of protesters did not attempt to build political support at lower levels. The target was the top and everybody else was dismissed as a lackey. Getting the state congressmen, governors and congressmen to support you doesn't work when you first call them lackeys. Getting Bush to change his mind is impossible if you first declare him a liar, a wimp and evil. 

The protesters refused to address the issue in terms the administration could accept or even understand. Saying the war is about oil means that to get the administration to either relent or compromise means them admitting it was all about oil. If the administration really doesn't think the war is about oil any argument or demand based on that assumption will either be ignored or seen as not-genuine. 

The protester weren't able to express what they were for in a coherent manner, meaning that nobody was sure what concession would suffice, so naturally none were given. The coalition didn't win over any elected officials and in a democracy they matter, protests, however big, only have power if they affect the elected officials. The protesters demonstrated a world view so at odds with the administration that they couldn't avoid calling Bush evil. I'm not going to negotiate with people who will negotiate with evil, why should the Bush administration?

sf_blue
sf_blue

I understand the frustration of the author. I was there that day, marching with tens of thousands of people in San Francisco. Knowing that this was a coordinated protest of millions around the world, perhaps the largest in history, was empowering, but it was never going to be enough to stop a war. Why? Days of action are not a strategy. They are a tactic. Marches and protests, as big as they may be, are only as powerful as the movement that they help to build. To stop a war, we have to organize ourselves for more than a day. We have to remove the pillars that allow that war to happen: the willingness of troops to fight, of Congress to authorize and fund it, of the necessary equipment to reach their destination. Many of us in the U.S. worked hard in all of these areas, organizing campaigns to counter military recruitment, to support military resisters, and even to blockade the movement of weapons onto ships bound for the middle east. We did not stop this war before it started, but we created such a backlash that our actions may have shortened its length, set the stage for the election of more war-weary president (Obama) and potentially even helped to stop the next war, wherever that may have been. We didn't do enough to stop this war before it started, but our actions helped change the country in ways we have yet to fully understand. 

rentstrike
rentstrike

It's not hard to understand AT ALL. As many of us argued at the time, the protests failed because they were conducted entirely in the realm of the symbolic, actually facilitating the stateside war effort by allowing GWB to point to them as evidence of our purportedly superior democracy. A worldwide boycott of the USA, combined with war tax resistance at home, would have made a difference by interfering with the profits of the profiteers whose interests drove us into the war, by the mainstream left in the United States preferred to stage showy protests where people marched puppets down empty weekend streets instead. See http://www.commondreams.org/views04/0317-13.htm for a fuller analysis.

BobJan
BobJan

We also had a Congress that was tapped in to the military money machine. Our Congress is "the best money can buy". Their kids didn't have to go. They sent the voters.

vstillwell
vstillwell

Freedom fries!

Cable news wanted that war like no other and a tuned out populace let it happen. That's why.