Painful Lessons from Romania’s Decade-Old Adoption Ban

Russia's decision Jan. 1 to end adoptions to the U.S. could have lasting effects for parents and children caught in limbo.

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Micheline Pelletier / Corbis

Abandoned children rest in a hospital in Constanta, Romania, Oct. 16, 2006.

Four-year-old Alina stood in her diaper, her bright eyes looking past the end of her bottle at the American woman who intended to adopt her from a maternity hospital in rural Romania.

This is how Mary, who planned on raising Alina, recounts one of her earliest meetings with the girl. With the adoption paperwork complete, a signature from Romania’s prime minister was all that stood between Alina’s placement in a stable American home and a childhood in Romania without a family. It never happened.

In 2001, Romania placed a moratorium on international adoptions, and officially banned the practice four years later, citing widespread corruption in adoption practices across borders. Alina, now 16, is one of a thousand “pipeline kids” left in limbo when Romania banned international adoption.

A similar fate may now await hundreds of orphans in Russia, which ended adoptions to American parents on Jan. 1. Some 1,000 Russian adoption cases are said to be in the pipeline — meaning that paperwork has been completed and, in most cases, prospective parents have met with their intended adoptees as many as three times.

Russia’s decision to end American adoptions is seen as a political response to the U.S.’s Magnitsky Act, an anticorruption law aimed at human rights abuses in Russia. But the adoption of Russian children by Americans has been a contentious issue for years.

(MORE: 2 U.S. Adoption Agencies Closing, Citing Woes Abroad)

Tempers flared in 2010 when an American woman put her adopted seven-year-old son on a flight back to Russia, where he now lives, with a letter citing “severe psychopathic issues.” And in February, a three-year old Russian boy died two months after his adoption to a Texas couple, not long after another toddler from the same orphanage died after being left in a car by his American adoptive father. (The former death was ruled accidental, and the father was acquitted of involuntary manslaughter for the latter.)

While Russian officials have said that some of the pipeline cases may be completed, it remains unclear whether these children will make it to the U.S. The situation is hauntingly familiar for many of the families that intended to adopt children from Romania a decade ago.

“What I feel for these families right now and for these children, they are going to have a lot of unresolved grief,” says Julie Murrell, who was in the process of adopting a two-year-old girl, Cristina, when the Romanian ban went into effect. “After about a year we moved on. A lot of the families haven’t really been able to move on.”

After Romania blocked their adoption, Murrell, 52, and her husband, 48, sent a private investigator to the foster home where Cristina had been living. They learned that several potential Romanian adoptive families had visited and that the foster mother chose one for the little girl. Julie and her husband have not heard from Cristina since.

“We thought the country might reopen,” Murrell says. “Now we realize we were the luckiest because we had closure.”

Murrell and her husband went on to adopt twin girls from Russia five years ago. But the wound from their Romanian experience remains. Their son, in elementary school at the time, had told all of his friends he was getting a sister. Murrell’s mother keeps a photo of Cristina with those of her other grandchildren.

(MORE: Moscow Skeptical About US Autopsy of Russian Boy)

Before giving up the fight for Cristina, now 13, Murrell joined with other pipeline parents in an effort to pressure the Romanian government to allow pending adoption cases to go through. Members of the group traveled to Romania to petition officials. Murrell wrote a letter to President Traian Basescu, and met with then Romanian Prime Minister Adrian Nastase when he came to Washington, D.C.

“He did say very positive things and I remember leaving there thinking this is a really positive thing,” Murrell says. “When you are in the situation you hear what you want to hear. But when I look back at it I think, you know, he just wanted us to shut up.”

For many pipeline families, the most difficult moment was deciding whether or not to stay in contact with the Romanian children they had hoped to adopt. More than 10 years later, many of the cases remain unresolved.

Another American woman, Ann, and her husband had already adopted two brothers and had completed the paperwork for two girls from the same orphanage in Romania when the ban went into effect. Ann spoke on the condition of anonymity out of concern for the welfare of the girls.

Patricia and Gabriela are now 9 and 10. Ann used to visit them twice a year, but eventually stopped going because she was concerned about how it would affect the girls as they grew older. It has been four years since she last saw them.

“They knew that someone was going to adopt them,” Ann says. “It was a little devastating – that’s why I stopped visiting them. I felt it was unfair emotionally for them. They had pictures of me. … I am not sure what they have been told. I kind of don’t want to know.”

Though the girls have not been adopted, Ann says she believes they are being well taken care of in a private, Christian orphanage that houses about 35 children. Because of their age and the fact that they are of Roma descent, it’s unlikely they will be adopted domestically in Romania. “They will never have family,” Ann says.

(MORE: Adoption)

For children like Patricia and Gabriela, the adoption ban may have serious consequences as they enter adulthood.

Like other American prospective parents, Rita filed paperwork and paid thousands of dollars in fees in her effort to adopt one-year-old Delia, whom Rita’s aunt and uncle had come to know during their time in the Peace Corps. Rita spoke on the condition of anonymity because her family continues to visit Delia, now 12, and is still looking for a way to get her to the U.S.

“We were told she was Roma and that she probably would not be adopted,” Rita says. “I know that she’s never going to have a family. She’s going to turn 18 and she’s going to be turned out on the street, and I’m not going to let that happen.”

Romania has no formal national assistance program for orphans after they leave state institutions. Most must leave at age 18, when they become legal adults. Few of the country’s 75,000 orphans know how to manage money, find an apartment, prepare food or search for a job. Many end up homeless and turn to crime, like prostitution, when they age out.

The same challenges face many of the tens of thousands of Russian orphans lingering in state institutions. U.S. families adopted nearly 1,000 Russian orphans in 2011.

After her adoption fell through, bright-eyed Alina lived in a series of foster homes before landing in a state-run orphanage. Mary, the American who failed to adopt Alina but became her godmother a decade ago, worries about what will happen when she turns 18 and is still trying to get her to the U.S.

“There are always bad people lurking in the shadows,” Mary says a teacher in the orphanage’s small town told her, “observing, and waiting for their opportunity. Children like [Alina] often become prostitutes.”

She says Alina looks forward to turning 18 because she’ll be “free.”

“She doesn’t understand what that even means,” she says. “This is what wakes me up in the middle of the night.

The names of some children and parents were changed in this article.

60 comments
SherryChildAdoption
SherryChildAdoption

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m4x1m
m4x1m

If the Americans wanted to help Romanian orphans ...... they would have created Romania adaptation centers adaptation and socialization to self life for Romanian orphans. Americans could help create a training professional system Romania orphans. Americans will not do it. Russia closed market of child trafficking. Americans want to establish trade Romanian orphans and compensate financial losses. 


Graduates orphanages. They are normal people. Do not have to lie that all orphans become idiots or criminals if Americans will not adopt them. That's a lie. How much money, effort and care the state will invest in these children .... get a return. If the state saves on orphans ..... then it raises the disabled state, beggars and criminals. 


Anniversary of a meeting of graduates of the orphanage № 1 (Altai). 

Foreigners not adopt children Buryat nationality in Russia. However, these children grow up and become successful people. 


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YxQ-HY8J1o4


0303qDsa88
0303qDsa88

Human rights? The Americans met or very gently punished sadistic rapists, murderers who tortured raped murdered Russian children. Russian children do not have rights in the U.S.? If the Russian kid in the US is less important than the American dog ........ why are you outraged? U.S. spat in the direction of Russia. The U.S. does not like Russian children. U.S. does not respect Russia. Why do Americans want to adopt Russian children? WHY? because Russian children are beautiful and smart white children. Americans adopt Russian very small number of children with special needs. Do not lie so that Americans SAVE RUSSIAN CHILDREN. They buy a beautiful Russian toy. Trade DISCONTINUED. Africa and China in your possession but not long. These countries will not be reconciled with the American judicial arbitrariness and irresponsibility. When you insult someone else's child = you offend someone else's country.

xsponcex
xsponcex

@0303qDsa88  

" when you insult someone else's child you offend their country"


How so? furthermore where did you get your education, because that has to be one of the most ignorantly opinionated comments I've ever read. 

Also who assigned you to speak for all of Russia, you know being the biggest country in the world, massively populated, and extremely rich with resources, it seems kind of arrogant to think you could speak for all who live there, especially the children in Russia and surrounding countries like Romania, Ukraine, Belarus, Estonia and all others that you Russians seem to think you own and speak for... Cold war is over man, Communism fell.

MaxiC
MaxiC

About Children Romania Ukraine Belarus Estonia will take care ..... native, independent state. In Russia there are more than 200 different nations and nationalities. However, foreign adoptive parents prefer to adopt in Russia is Russian children. All children are equally precious and needed in Russia. These are not empty words. This is a consequence of demographic abyss. After the collapse of the USSR was the strongest economic crisis in Russia. In this period of intense freedom and democracy ...... people were dying en masse, but the children were not born. Russia lost more than 6 million people. For example, in Estonia has   1  291,170 people. Estonia 6 times could die out completely ..... if the West had "helped" Estonia ALSO as "helped" Russia. Now Russia has banned the adoption for the United States. Because these children are too expensive and precious. This profligacy .... if Americans can kill with impunity ..... intent and unintentional. Also American ways "treatment" RAD not recognized global medicine. Attachments therapy is child abuse. Therefore, Russia has protected our children from impunity kills and legal abuse in the United States.

MaxiC
MaxiC

@xsponcex If the state does not want to protect foster children ..... that the state should not adopt foreign children. In a foreign country nobody even weep over the lost child. Adoptive parents vying watered dead kid mud to escape responsibility. "Child killed himself". "Child himself beaten." Always turns Child himself starved. What will happen? Child himself raped, killed himself and himself buried in the ground?
Not always  foster family  better than a  orphanage.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=03Jcv06mL2M
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L3HArwsfEd8

m4x1m
m4x1m

@xsponcex


Belarus protects their children and do not allow mass selling of orphans. Foreigners rarely Belarusian adopt orphans. Therefore Belarusian children have no habits himself beat and kill himself.   

Belarusian orphans 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CxUmFmFP3vo

Romanian
Romanian

Another propaganda pro-adoption and human trafficking thru the profitable inter-country adoption agencies ! What a shame !

sportsismylife42
sportsismylife42

All mommas know it: teenagers are hard. Three teenage girls are harder. Three teenage girls from different tribes and cultures and pasts trying to live together in one bedroom are harder still.

In an effort to be real, I want to tell you. Adoption is wonderful and beautiful and the greatest blessing I have ever experienced. Adoption is also HARD and painful. Adoption of older children is a beautiful picture of redemption. It is the GOSPEL in my living room. And some times, it just stinks.

As a parent, it stinks to not know when your daughter took her first steps or what her first word was or what she looked like in Kindergarten. It stinks not to know where she slept and whose shoulder she cried on and what the scar on her eyebrow is from. It stinks to know that for ten years of her precious life you were NOT the shoulder she cried on or the Mommy she hugged.

As a child, it stinks to remember your biological parents’ death, not matter how much you love your new Mom. It stinks to have your mom be a different color than you because, inevitably, people are going to ask why. It stinks that your Mom wasn’t there for all the times you had no dinner and all the times you were sick and all the times you needed help with your homework. It stinks when you have to make up your birthday. It skinks when you can’t understand the concept of being a family forever because your first family wasn’t forever.

And every single day, it is worth it. Because ADOPTION IS GOD’S HEART. He sets the lonely in families.Adoption is the reason that I can come before God’s throne and beg Him for mercy, because He predestined me to be adopted as His child through Jesus Christ, in accordance with his pleasure and will— to the praise of his glorious grace, which he has freely given us in the One he loves.

My family, adopting these children, it is not optional. It is not my good deed for the day, it is not what I am doing to “help these poor kids out.” I adopt because God commands me to care for the orphans and the widows in their distress. I adopt because to whom much has been given, much will be demanded. I adopt because whoever finds his life will lose it but whoever loses his life for HIS sake will find it.

Some days, my friends, it is not easy. Today, it is not easy. The HURT in my daughters’ hearts is big and real and as their mother, I want to fix it and know that I CAN’T. So I lay it at the feet of my Father and rejoice to know that if we are children, then we are heirs - of God and co-heirs with Christ, if indeed we share in His sufferings - in order that we may also share in His glory. And I call out to the Holy Spirit knowing thatHe is able to save completely those who come to God through Him, because He always lives to intercede for us.

A sweet friend pointed me yesterday to Genesis Chapter 33. Esau and Jacob are meeting for the first time in a long time. As Jacob approaches Esau, with his many children following close behind, Esau asks, “ And who are these with you?”

Jacob’s reply: “These are the children that the Lord saw fit to bless me with.”

We get all the questions. “Why do you do it?” “Why so many?” “How in the world…” “Why these specific girls?” “Why the number 14?” “Do you think its ok to adopt as a single Mother? Don’t they need a father too?” “Do you think they will have issues since you are not the same race?” We also get the compliments. “I don’t know how you do it!” “Good job!” “You must be so responsible!” “Your girls must be so well behaved.” We get crazy stares and huge smiles and every look inbetween.

Adoption is beautiful. Adoption is hard. Adoption is the Gospel of Christ and the promise of God’s love and redemption lived out in our lives. So I ask for your prayers. Prayers for understanding and peace and trust and the power of God that is more than all I can ask or imagine. And to the questions and the comments and the compliments, this is my reply: “These are the children that the Lord saw fit to bless me with.”


 by Katie Davis go to her blog at amazima.org. She is incredible and listen to what she has done.. she saves Uganda children.

choosen7
choosen7

I am an American. I have adopted 3 children and am in the process of adopting a 12 year old. We also have biological children. One of our children is from Romania and is Roma decent.She was one of the fortunate to be adopted from Romania. The others are from the US. I lived in Romania for several years. I have seen with my own eyes cribs lined up with babies and the "nurses" in the staff room smoking and drinking coffee all day long. I have seen burns on babies who were taken back to their last given address in a Roma village and left in ditches. I have meet children who were there before the fall of communism and after. I also have seen selfless people; American, Sweedish, Canadian, and Romanian making a difference by adopting or supporting people who can adopt precious Romanian children. What I do have to comment is that there are people who have a love for the "least of these". Adoption is a beautiful thing. There are too many children without forever families. My husband and I have decided to do something about it. It doesnt matter where or how they came. We are determined to give them a family where they can grow and thrive and to give them a home where we will eventually be their childrens grandparents. We are a middle class family in our early thirties. Adoption does cost. It costs your everyday life of patience, time, effort, support, and constant love. Romanians do not typically adopt especially since 90 percent of the orphans are of Roma decent. My little Roma-Romanian is doing just fine. I could care less of what anyone thinks of our family. She didnt end up in a ditch.

choosen7
choosen7

I am an American. I have adopted 3 children and am in the process of adopting a 12 year old. We also have biological children. One of our children is from Romania and is Roma decent.She was one of the fortunate to be adopted from Romania. The others are from the US. I lived in Romania for several years. I have seen with my own eyes cribs lined up with babies and the "nurses" in the staff room smoking and drinking coffee all day long. I have seen burns on babies who were taken back to their last given address in a Roma village and left in ditches. I have meet children who were there before the fall of communism and after. I also have seen selfless people; American, Sweedish, Canadian, and Romanian making a difference by adopting or supporting people who can adopt precious Romanian children. What I do have to comment is that there are people who have a love for the "least of these". Adoption is a beautiful thing. There are too many children without forever families. My husband and I have decided to do something about it. It doesnt matter where or how they came. We are determined to give themmily where they can grow and thrive.We are a middle class family in our early thirties. Adoption does cost. It costs your everyday life of patience, time, effort, support, and constant love. Romanians do not typically adopt especially since 90 percent of the orphans are of Roma decent. My little Roma-Romanian is doing just fine. I could care less of what anyone thinks of our family. She didnt end up in a ditch.

MirahRiben
MirahRiben

@Alisa You can "think" what you want and make  accusations about me and you can live with blinders on, but facts are facts.  Why have adoptions been stopped in many nations? ABC news covered the corruption In Romania. This is way bigger than just little ole me with a chip on my shoulder saying so, Alisa! Open your eyes and READ the FACTS! 

http://abcnews.go.com/2020/story?id=123967&page=1

Profit, not care: The ugly side of overseas adoptions  http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/profit-not-care-the-ugly-side-of-overseas-adoptions-2293198.html

Adoption as Supply-and-Demand for Infertile Couples  http://www.americanmamacita.com/blog/adoption-as-supply-and-demand-for-infertile-couples/

http://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/health-and-families/health-news/profit-not-care-the-ugly-side-of-overseas-adoptions-2293198.html

Orphaned or Stolen: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/schuster-institute-for-investigative-journalism/orphaned-or-stolen-the-us_b_825451.html

Duped by Indian adoption agency, US family cautions couples. http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/politics/nation/Duped-by-Indian-adoption-agency-US-family-cautions-couples/articleshow/5964751.cms

Read Julia Rollings story at: http://bittersweet-story.blogspot.com/

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/comment/columnists/christopherbooker/7840626/Big-money-to-be-made-in-the-adoption-trade.html

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2010/09/07/anatomy_of_an_adoption_crisis

http://www.theatlantic.com/international/archive/2011/10/black-market-babies-broken-families-in-china-confused-children-in-the-us/247329/

http://www.foreignpolicy.com/articles/2008/10/15/the_lie_we_love

http://www.democracyjournal.org/17/6757.php?page=all

Re: CHINA

http://www.chinapost.com.tw/china/national-news/2012/06/17/344625/China-sentences.htm

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/china/8939661/Chinese-police-rescue-178-children-after-mass-child-trafficking-ring-bust.html

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/09/18/nyregion/chinas-adoption-scandal-sends-chills-through-families-in-united-states.html?pagewanted=1&_r=2

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/adoption-stories/200909/la-times-chinese-babies-stolen-foreign-adoption

http://www.mercatornet.com/family_edge/view/5824/

http://ouradopt.com/adoption-blog/jan-2009/juliafuller/was-baby-you-adopted-china-stolen-or-purchased 

Re Ethiopia:

http://allafrica.com/stories/201208061002.html

http://familypreservation.blogspot.com/2010/05/must-see-video-news-report-about-child.html

http://www.ethicanet.org/ethiopia-to-cut-foreign-adoptions-by-up-to-90-percent

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/rani-hong/human-trafficking-prevention-month_b_1199395.html

Inside Ethiopia's Adoption Boom  http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052702304811304577368243366708110.html

"To focus on these children without focusing on their families or communities thus becomes an ignoble hypocrisy; as if to say, 'give us your huddled masses–but only if they are cute children and can be indoctrinated from an early age'.” 

Islamophobia and Adoption

Who Are the Civilized?

by Daniel Ibn Zayd / April 17th, 2012  http://dissidentvoice.org/2012/04/islamophobia-and-adoption/

MirahRiben
MirahRiben

@MistStilipec 

My name is Mirah Riben. Google me. I was born in Brooklyn NY. Full Blooded American citizen!

Not a Russian spy or paid to say anything I have said! Everything that i have said is documented fact based on nearly 40 years of researching, writing and speaking about adoption.

Lobbyists FOR the pro-adoption industry are the ones who do what they do for MONEY. Grassroots reformers like myself do what we do to help children in crisis just as UNICEF, SOS for children , Save the Children and many NGOs who work with families in crisis who state emphatically that International Adoption should be a last resort.


Follow the money and see which side is all about money. It's very simple. UNICEF has nothing to gain but helping kids and families! Adoption agencies and middlemen have deep pockets. 

MistStilipec
MistStilipec

One story you will never cover is the biological mothers and fathers whose lives are destroyed over the forced adoption of their children, children who often wind up in foster care for life.  You will never talk about American families right here who lose thir constitutional rights and their parental rightsin a court of law because adoption law is written by adoption agencies to disenfranchise parents under the law and give unequal rights to a stranger to abduct a child and claim that forced bonding is love.  You will never talk about it being exploitive or child abuse for adoptiove parents and agnecies to recieve federal money that should have been given to the parents so they can raise thier own children.  You will never talk about an adoption certificate costs up to $60,000 and that rather than plucking a few children form a poor country that this money would be better spent on fertility research in the US and in building schools in the poorer countries.  All you will ever talk about is how sad it is that some stranger bonds over a child that is not there and cries when corrupt and illegal child trafficking otherwise known as abusive adoption is questioned and stopped.

pendragon05
pendragon05

For the longest time I have questioned this social practice of having children as a status symbol. In the United States, it is understandable why adoption is so difficult within our borders, the reason for so much red tape; to weed out those who want direct access to children (pedophiles) but more importantly, those who simply want a child to complete that status.

MirahRiben
MirahRiben

Apparently, this needs repeating for the sake of @rpearlston:

The question is whether we should continue to allow international adoption from a nation that wants it stopped for good reason.
The fact that children are abused and killed by their biological parents is a very sad fact of life that is beyond horrible, but it is NOT at issue here. Children are born often as a result of accident or to parents unfortunately ill-equipped or knowledgeable on child care. Some are far too young others are just simply ignorant and do not know that you must not ever shake a baby, for instance. Some are overworked and tried. Some are abusing substances or have anger control issues. None of this is an excuse, but it explains it.  There is no excuse for anyone abusing any child. And, unfortunately, there is no test on parenthood and no way to stop bad parents from reproducing. 
Adoption, however, is supposed to be the safety net for children who not have family to provide safe care for them. 
Those who adopt are supposed to be above reproach. We expect them to be highly motivated - not becoming parents accidentally. We expect that they are vetted and have passed home studies and have no criminal background. We do not expect that such parents who try to hard and go out of their way and spend thousands of dollars to be entrusted with others' children in need, would harm them!  Even ONE child harmed by those entrusted with their care - intentionally -  is unacceptable, let alone NINETEEN !
Proof? Here it is: 
http://adoption.about.com/od/adoptionrights/p/russian_children_murdered_by_adoptive_parent.htm

JeffreyGeezGlavick
JeffreyGeezGlavick

@ MaureenFlatley---There is the hippocratic oath and then there is the Hypocritical Boast, that would be the USA telling the world in Ronald Reagan's exact words:" America is the moral conscience of the World" and he said this Before Alzheimer's set in.

FreidaPotter
FreidaPotter

It is also worth noting that the US violated the adoption treaty with Russia FIRST - by failing to allow Russian officials consular access to an abused Russian-born boy in Florida in November 2012. The adoption treaty came into force that same month! If the USA cannot be bothered to hold up its end of a treaty that has been in force for a couple of weeks, why should russia? Actions have consequences. (The US violated the treaty a second time by failing to inform Russia of Max Shatto's death in a timely manner - as required by the treaty regardless of the cause of death). These actions have given Russia legitimate grounds for banning US adoptions.

It's also worth noting that Canada and Europe are still permitted to adopt Russian kids - countries that have not violated their adoption treaties with Russia OR killed their Russian-born kids. Only Americans are banned from adopting.

I don't think it's a coincidence!

MirahRiben
MirahRiben

Russia has the RIGHT and the obligation to care for and protect its children, as does every nation.

The United nations and many other NGOs who work on the ground with children and families in crisis all say that International Adoption should be a last resort.  I didn't make this up. I am an investigative journalist and REPORT the facts, i do not create them. And I am far from alone. read the works of David Smolin and adoptive father an law professor who is the leading expert on child trafficking for adoption. Read E.J. Graff's (a journalist with no personal ties to adoption) articles on the subject.

Russia has the RIGHT and obligation to care for its children as it sees fit! Period! What is it anyone else's business? No one OWES anyone a child! 

MirahRiben
MirahRiben

The fact is that 19 Russian children adopted by Americans were MURDERED by those who vowed to care for them, and countless others are being abused or abandoned. Many are sent to The Ranch for kids in Minnesota.

The fact is that there more than 100,000 children in US state care who could be adopted but are ignored because they are thought to be "damaged." Russian children are sought after because they are white but often suffer fetal alcohol syndrome and the effects of institutionalization that adopters are unprepared for and many cannot deal with.

Each nation needs to care for its own children in care and do its best t prevent the crisis that bring children into care by providing cost free birth control, affordable day care, sufficient jobs, etc.

Taking children one at a time out of their cultural heritage does nothing to ameliorate the poverty or other woes of their families, villages or nations. Adoption has become a mega-billion dollar industry importimng and exporting children to meet a demand. We need to focus on what is best for the children and that is providing them the care they need and deserve within their own nation.

There is nothing altruistic about paying tens of thousands of dollars to "rescue" one child and have much of that money go to unscrupulous baby brokers who often steal or kidnap children to meet the demand, when those funds could be used instead to supply water, medical supplies or schools for children in need, especially in places like ethiopia which is the newest poor nation to be EXPLOITED by money-hungry child traffickers.

Stop the insanity!

Mirah Riben, author, THE STORK MARKET: America's Multi-Bullion Dollar Unregulated Adoption Industry

JeffreyGeezGlavick
JeffreyGeezGlavick

One question remains: that American women who put the Russian 7 yr.old  child on a plane by himself??? how pray tell. Normally that is Impossible and also illegal, so how did an unaccompanied minor fly?

MaureenFlatley
MaureenFlatley

There are 25,000 "Alinas" who age out of foster care in this country every year - 250,000 since Romania's adoption ban when into effect.  Where is the outrage for those children?