Quebec’s War on English: Language Politics Intensify in Canadian Province

A controversial new bill proposed by the sovereigntist Parti Quebecois is stirring up tensions between English and French-speakers in Quebec.

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ROGERIO BARBOSA / AFP / Getty Images

Parti Quebecois leader Pauline Marois addresses supporters in Montreal on Sept. 4, 2012. One person was killed and another seriously wounded when a gunman opened fire during her speech.

To live in Quebec is to become accustomed to daily reminders that French in the Canadian province is the most regulated language in the world. Try, as I did recently, to shop at Anthropologie online and you’ll come up empty-handed. The retail chain (which bears a French name) opened its first Montreal boutique in October, but “due to the Charter of the French Language” has had its site shut down: “We hope you’ll visit us in store!” Montreal’s transit authority maintains that under the present language law, its ticket takers must operate in French, which lately has spurred complaints from passengers. Last year, the city of Montreal erected 60 English safety signs nearby Anglophone schools in an effort to slow passing vehicles. The Quebec Board of the French Language and its squad of inspectors ordered that they be taken down; a snowy drive through town revealed that all had been replaced by French notices.

Since the Parti Québécois (PQ), which calls for national sovereignty for Quebec, won a minority government in September, the reminders have become increasingly less subtle. In February, a language inspector cited the swank supper club Buonanotte, which occupies a stretch of St. Laurent Boulevard, Montreal’s cultural and commercial artery, for using Italian words like pasta on its otherwise French menu. The ensuing scandal, which has come to be known as “pastagate,” took social media by storm. “These are problems we had in the 1980s,” says restaurant owner Massimo Lecas. “They were over and done with; we could finally concentrate on the economy and fixing potholes. And then this new government brought them all back. These issues might never go away now, and that is a scary sort of future.”

It’s true: despite the nuisances and controversies generated by Bill 101, Quebec’s 1977 Charter of the French Language, the province had settled in the past years into a kind of linguistic peace. But tensions have mounted considerably since the separatist PQ returned to the fore. In the wake of pastagate, the language board allowed that its requests were maybe overzealous; the head of the organization resigned. And yet the PQ has prepared for the passage of Bill 14, a massive and massively controversial revision to Bill 101. The bill’s 155 proposed amendments go further than any previous measures have to legislate the use of French in Quebec. Most English speakers see the changes as having been designed to run them right out of the province.

“Definitely non-Francophone kids who are graduating are leaving,” says restaurateur Lecas. “If you don’t have a mortgage yet, if you’re not married yet, if you don’t own a business yet, it’s like, ‘I’m so outta here.’ But leaving is not the solution because when you leave, they win.” In a poll conducted by the research company EKOS in January, 42% of the Anglophones surveyed said they’ve considered quitting Quebec since the PQ was elected.

If Bill 14 passes, military families living in Quebec but liable to be relocated at any time will no longer be permitted to send their children to English-language schools. Municipalities whose Anglophone inhabitants make up less than 50% of their populations will lose their bilingual status, meaning, among other things, that residents won’t be able to access government documents in English. For the first time, companies with 25 to 49 workers will be required to conduct all business in French, a process set to cost medium-size businesses $23 million. French speakers interested in attending English-language colleges will take a backseat to Anglophone applicants. The language inspectors will be able to instantly search and seize potentially transgressive records, files, books and accounts, where currently they can only “request” documents that they believe aren’t in accordance with the law. And no longer will they grant a compliance period. As soon as a person or business is suspected of an offense, “appropriate penal proceedings may be instituted.”

Jamie Rosenbluth of JR Bike Rental is among the business owners who’ve had run-ins with the ever more bold language board, which already has the authority to impose fines and, in extreme cases, shut enterprises down. A month ago, an inspector asked him to translate the Spanish novelty posters that paper his shop and increase the size of the French writing on his bilingual pricing list by 30%. Says Rosenbluth: “I told her, ‘You want me to make the French words 30% bigger? O.K., how about I charge French-speaking people 30% more?’ It is so silly. Are they 30% better than me? Are they 30% smarter than me?” Since the encounter, he has covered the offending posters with placards of his own that say, in French, “Warning: Non-French sign below. Read at your own discretion.”

The PQ is trying to reassure its separatist base of its seriousness as a defender of Quebecois identity. To pass Bill 14, it will need the support of at least one of the province’s two primary opposition parties. In other words, if the bill doesn’t succeed, Premier Pauline Marois of the PQ will be able to hold the opposition accountable and remain a hero to the hard-liners. The PQ knows that, in its present incarnation, it will never drastically expand its core of support, but it can galvanize its troops. Some of those supporters rallied together in Montreal last month to protest “institutional bilingualism” and champion the bill. Cheers and applause resounded when journalist Pierre Dubuc called out: “If someone can’t ask for a metro ticket in French, let them walk.”

Public hearings on Bill 14 began in early March at the National Assembly in Quebec City and are ongoing. “I can tell you that if someone came to Côte-St.-Luc to tell us we would lose our bilingual status, you will have chaos, you will have opposition of people you wouldn’t think of who will take to the streets,” testified Anthony Housefather, mayor of the municipality of Côte-St.-Luc, on the first day. “People are scared, people are very scared.” By the time Quebec’s largest Anglophone school board, Lester B. Pearson, came forward on March 19, it had already collected 32,000 signatures on a petition against the bill. “There are many ways of protecting French, and coercion isn’t one of them,” says Simo Kruyt, a member of the board’s central parent committee. “Fourteen of our schools have closed over the past seven years. We are getting fed up. We are getting tired of having to fight to be who we are. English is the language of commerce and we parents believe we are part of a world that’s larger than Quebec.”

It’s hard yet to say if the bill will make it through. The opposition Liberals have flat-out refused to support the legislation. The Coalition Avenir Québec, which holds the balance, has said that it might — if certain of the more controversial measures are “improved.” In fact, the Coalition has only come out against four sections of Bill 14, and these don’t include the provisions that would give the dreaded language inspectors new and extraordinary powers. In the face of such antagonism, it’s no wonder some are leaving. Kruyt’s eldest son, a bilingual 27-year-old engineer, is preparing to relocate to Ottawa, the Canadian capital that sits near Quebec’s western border. Says Kruyt: “There, they’ll appreciate his French and won’t hammer him because of his English.”

In response to this story published April 8, Quebec’s Delegate General to New York submitted a letter to the editor on April 11 that can be read here.

4856 comments
JamesSimon
JamesSimon

I had a cousin who lived in Quebec for most of her childhood. She always spoke about how there was a bit of conflict here. She never made it out to be a major "war" on any language, though, so I'm not totally convinced of the severity portrayed here. She went to a language school and learned Spanish, and she was bi-lingual before that. I don't see anything wrong with learning multiple languages.

http://www.gtls-canada.com/our-school/

melanieclark_4
melanieclark_4

Silly me for writing in but I am married to an American citizen and my mom tried to send him a birthday card in English... nowhere to find in our home town of Saint-Hyacinthe. All drug stores have decided to no longer carry English material. Fair?

DavidASawyer
DavidASawyer

Im American BUT all I see in all reality is the USA having a war with all languages except for Spanish. But as hypocrites people are dismayed when Canada wants to take a stand and hold onto their heritage without conforming to the US. I think it's great that they mostly want to speak French. In fact Ive taken a few courses in it and Im currently studying & learning more so that when Im in Canada I can speak French. Americans just don't understand a lot of things logically its a rather egocentric and hypocritical culture we live in.

melanieclark_4
melanieclark_4

@DavidASawyer This has nothing to do with the USA, but with Quebec trying to hold on to a French demographic. As they should. But to be oblivious to the world around them? That's ridiculous. It's all about internal politics; nothing the U.S. can do

DavidASawyer
DavidASawyer

@melanieclark_4 @DavidASawyer  I disagree. I don't see them as being isolationists and if anything the proof is that they scored higher on the Ipsos Mori index of ignorance higher than the US. So if anything they are very knowledgeable about the world around them. And I still think this is another US attack on the world. The US hates it's own allies and wants to consume other countries like Canada. If anything the Canadians (Even in Quebec are not ignorant of the world around them. If anything they know enough about the world to protect themselves from the world but that doesn't make them isolationists nor ignorant). They have demonstrated they are educated about the world.

mkat
mkat

@DavidASawyer @melanieclark_4 That says more about the U.S. than it does about Quebec. Sorry to break it to you but one of the reasons why Americans are mocked at so much by the rest of the world is because of their general blatant ignorance. "So if anything they are very knowledgeable about the world around them." Umm okay then... care to elaborate? Comparing Quebec to one of the most uninformed or misinformed countries is not a good way to gauge how knowledgeable a group of people is... And finally this has absolutely nothing to do with America no matter how you try to twist it. The real misinformed person is you. 

DevinMcLarty
DevinMcLarty

Um... You do realize that the vast majority of Canada speaks English, and always has- don't you?

It's only the province of Quebec that wants to become a dictatorship by creating biased and unfair language laws.

The funny thing is, they don't even speak actual French- most French people ridicule Canadian French.

And no, the United States of America has absolutely nothing to do with this issue.

DennysMorley
DennysMorley

So here you kinda agree that English is greater than French, and down there you don't? Make up your mind dude.

gahan7797
gahan7797

I am a US citizen who took my family to Quebec City and Montreal in Dec 2014. I was very unpleasantly surprised by lack of bilingual signs. There were no traffic warnings and safety signs. This was just a small inconvenience. The thing that I found stupid and showed a general attitude of Quebec's leaders and it's citizens being backward and behind even the worst developed 3rd world countries are the fact that even it's historical monuments such as the Parliament building and many of its statues and other historical sites and monuments only had inscriptions explaining the history and events in French. I found this to be very odd because most countries of the world; even North Korea for the most part, have English language plaques along with their native languages to describe their monuments, events, and statues of historically significant figures so that foreigners visiting their countries can learn their history and achievements. I was very disappointed that I could not explain the rich cultural heritage of the people of Quebec to my children because I could not read French.....I am sure that the local french speaking people are already familiar with their history. Because of this; I think it is more important to have English language plaques on Quebec's monuments because even if they don't want to admit it; it's s reality that English is a world language. Not only for foreign visitors sake but for the sake of other Canadians that visits Quebec. I felt that Quebec's policy seemed very backwards and did not seemed too welcoming towards non French speakers. I am not saying that Quebec should do anything special. I simply wish that their policy makers follow established international protocol. ...I have traveled to more countries than I can count. I have never visited anywhere so backward in its attitude then Quebec....it's worst than North Korea ..if Quebec is proud and confident of itself; it should grow up and behave like a responsible adult. If it does, it's tourist industry will grow and make Quebec one of the most popular destination of the world. If it maintains its current policy; it will become a place to avoid by the citizens of the world as well as by fellow Canadians.

DavidASawyer
DavidASawyer

@gahan7797 Most countries have monuments that are bilingual according to what their top languages are. It's like here in the US. Since the USA favors Spanish over any other language a lot of our plaques, statues, instructions, manuals, and even recipe books use Spanish as a 2nd language. That doesn't mean we should all speak only Spanish. ha ha Besides you are being egocentric to think all other countries should switch to English. In fact English is a rather sloppy language with many problems when trying to communicate. English is also one of the worlds hardest languages to learn (if learning it as a 2nd language). It may not seem like it to us since we grew up speaking English but English is not the best language for the world to learn.

DennysMorley
DennysMorley

@DavidASawyer @gahan7797 @DavidASawyer @melanieclark_4  I really think Quebecoirs should keep it down and accept English. That's the language of 5 great nations in the world, a great language to have as native, simple, straight forward, beautiful, language of success, business, science... Quebecoirs are Canadians, and English is Canada's native language (except Quebec), so they should forget French, and start making English its native language for the next generations not have to struggle learning English, it's a horrible language to have as second, I know many ESL and sometimes I just can't communicate, I can't understand the expressions they translate from their mother tongue into English, some of them are really good at English, but they deal with the struggle everyday. Learning other languages is great, I am about to start French myself, but English sounds cool, and is a great language to have as first. So they should do like the USA, in Louisiana only super old people still speak French, but they speak mostly English *second language*, because the other generations don't speak French, which means French died in Louisiana, so should it in Quebec. English also helps English speaking countries make more money, because foreigners come to us to study our language, so they can be more successful. We could learn other languages too, but really, English is the only one one must know to succeed, like, EVERYTHING is in English, everyone speaks English, I am not being a dick or a patriot or hating on every other language, I am saying a fact. English is spoken by everyone in a regular basis.  In Iceland the entire population speaks English as a sec language, and they use it everyday among themselves. Same in Norway, Finland, Sweden... English is the language one must know, French is for hobbie, or any other language really. You do it for excitement and because you like it. I think French speaking Canadians should suck English up, because the French lost and didn't entirely colonize Canada, so they should accept the fact that English will remain in there forever, and they will have to make better language laws to support both equally, favoring English mostly, of course. That's my opinion, you can and maybe SHOULD disagree, just don't call me names for disagreeing. Have a good day.

mkat
mkat

@DavidASawyer @gahan7797 English is not even close to being the "world's hardest language." Mandarin Chinese for instance is much harder, Portuguese and Hungarian are also much more difficult to learn. There are many others as well.  Secondly, English is not "sloppy" whatever that means. While French is more eloquent and sophisticated, English is more practical as many English words are simpler than French words having been taken from German. French has very difficult verb tenses (that even most fluent French speakers don't fully comprehend.) 


DevinMcLarty
DevinMcLarty

You said not to call you names, but unfortunately I'm going to have to call you a troll. Plain and simple.

If not that, an idiot.

Reading your post gave me brain cancer.

That is the most idiotic and ignorantly biased comment I have read in a long time.

No, Quebec should NOT forget French and transition to English. What the hell are you on about? They are a bilingual nation- and should stay that way.

You should keep your insipid thoughts and "opinions" to yourself.

Quebec doesn't care what you think about English or the people who speak it as a second language, especially since they DON'T speak English as a second language.

Unlike your dumb ass, they are bilingual and can speak English as well as French.

DennysMorley
DennysMorley

They speak English as a second language and outside of Quebec they don't use French. Canada isn't that bilingual. It's Quebec, charts, surveys and facts say so. Gov employees are required to speak average French, and most of them are not native French speakers, so their French is basically weird as I suppose average ESL speakers' English is. French in Quebec is broken dude, the French didn't pass the language along that well. You can think whatever, but you can get away and survive way much better in a non-English speaking country than French. The odds of finding French speaking people in a certain country is way much less than English. If you wanna live in the best nation for education purpoaes on earth (Norway), you have two options: Norwegian or English. You can have classes in English, and Norwegian citizens can and most have classes in English. So, Quebec should feel lucky and MAYBE not totally forget French, but accept English at least as well as French, but again, favouring English which is the language one must know. And you said my comment gave you brain cancer (no, it really didn't cuz I'm not that lucky.) I'm not replying to any other comments, so you don't need to bother, because I am not even going to read. These are facts and mostly my opinion, you don't have to agree with me. Also, if you like or love or even speak French, it's fine, I like it too, but it is a loser language. I don't understand why bother trying to restore that language 78% installed. Ya know, the French barely finished installing the language in Quebec, which is why their French is soooo Flanglais specially in accent, even if they say otherwise ;) bye.

gahan7797
gahan7797

I am a US citizen who took my family to Quebec City and Montreal in Dec 2014. I was very unpleasantly surprised by lack of bilingual signs. There were no traffic warnings and safety signs. This was just a small inconvenience. The thing that I found stupid and showed a general attitude of Quebec's leaders and it's citizens being backward and behind even the worst developed 3rd world countries are the fact that even it's historical monuments such as the Parliament building and many of its statues and other historical sites and monuments only had inscriptions explaining the history and events in French. I found this to be very odd because most countries of the world; even North Korea for the most part, have English language plaques along with their native languages to describe their monuments, events, and statues of historically significant figures so that foreigners visiting their countries can learn their history and achievements. I was very disappointed that I could not explain the rich cultural heritage of the people of Quebec to my children because I could not read French.....I am sure that the local french speaking people are already familiar with their history. Because of this; I think it is more important to have English language plaques on Quebec's monuments because even if they don't want to admit it; it's s reality that English is a world language. Not only for foreign visitors sake but for the sake of other Canadians that visits Quebec. I felt that Quebec's policy seemed very backwards and did not seemed too welcoming towards non French speakers. I am not saying that Quebec should do anything special. I simply wish that their policy makers follow established international protocol. ...I have traveled to more countries than I can count. I have never visited a country that did not use any English

DavidASawyer
DavidASawyer

@gahan7797 I praise the Canadians for not conforming to the USA. The US is like the BORG on Star Trek, delusional, egocentric, sociopathic, and opportunist and wants the world to all speak English because Americans are too lazy and not respectful enough to realize that visiting other countries on vacation isn't like going to Disney World. Other countries are real place with real people, with real cultures of their own. They are not simply the USA's playground. They aren't supposed to baby you and your spoiled fat brats.

samspadeagain
samspadeagain

@DavidASawyer David this isn't really about U.S. Americans at all. It's about English speaking Canadians and French speaking Canadians. The largest group that oppose this movement are English speaking CANADIANS. The whole notion that people who oppose this movement are somehow "conforming to the USA" is totally myopic!! Even if you seem to think it's the opposite. Maybe if you read up a little about Canadian history and about the history of bilingualism in Canada you could make a more informed comment.

ferreira-999
ferreira-999

First off, let me state that I am a born and bred English speaking Quebecer. Secondly I think you need to do some language research because french is in fact one of the hardest languages to learn, not english! Third, french quebecers have no culture, all they have is a disgustingly distant version of real french.

DennysMorley
DennysMorley

So many mistakes that believing you're even a US citizen seems insulting.

kiki1998
kiki1998

I believe that Québec is enforcing this because we want to protect are language! I'm a french Canadian and believe that 

Québec is doing the right thing for are language and culture! It respect for us francophone's and to show how proud we are to be french! I really don't see any problems with this at all!!

jamie.bissonnette
jamie.bissonnette

@kiki1998  Wrong

Many french are a collective bunch of whiners and that is in our culture.  Other nations accept diversity without playing the culture card, but here in the province of Quebec, we essentially shun diversity out of arrogant pride.

gahan7797
gahan7797

If it is so proud of itself; why doesn't it show confidence? Why Does It Not Have Plaques At Historical Sites describing it's proud heritage in other language beside French. I wanted to learn about it's history but could not because it only had Fench. It's like that only in Quebec. In France, all monuments had French and English language plaques describing it's rich historical monuments.

DavidASawyer
DavidASawyer

@kiki1998 I agree. Im one of those few Americans that appreciate that Canada is trying to hold onto it's history, culture, and language. And not cater to a childish conformist society like the USA. If anything the US seems to have a war on all other languages and treats other countries like it's Americas playground. Sad really.

melanieclark_4
melanieclark_4

@kiki1998 I am French Canadian as well. Born and raised in Saint-Hyacinthe. Never was taught English but in high school classes. And I believe in preserving the French heritage, but this is ridiculous. People have come to despise anyone who speaks anything but French, much less English, and I am ashamed of my country. My husband, a US citizen, now comes to visit my family and is received with animosity. We used to be good people; we are now another facet of Hitler's breed. SHAMEFUL! I am french Canadian and I am ashamed to take my husband home. 

Enirdas1
Enirdas1

@AnneDunn @kiki1998 it is so arrogant to think that without you the place will collapse, and who are the winners here? not the French Quebecers for what I see.

The poor Anglos, they are so pityfull. According to Statistics Canada, (http://www12.statcan.gc.ca/) in their "Detailed Language Spoken Most Often at Home (232)" only 10% of the population speaks English most often at home while  80% are speaking French. But the Anglos whine so much that il looks like they have nothing... but they receive 29% of the funds allocated to all Quebec's universities...they also have 3 universities, McGill, Bishop and Concordia. THere are only four French universities, Laval, Montreal,Sherbrooke and Quebec. What is really a shame is to give so much money to only 10% of the population!!

When you listen to them, the Anglos in Quebec whine so much that they look like they are bullied , but when you look deeper, the number show otherwise. Anglos just complain....

DennysMorley
DennysMorley

@melanieclark_4 @kiki1998 This protecting language thing comes from filthy French culture, in France they have several laws banning any language rather than French. They hate other languages, but they gave in to English recently and made some government websites available in English. But rather than that, the French hate any language, and the English do too, so we Americans, Aussies, Kiwis etc all got this hating on other languages from the English as well as in Quebec from the French. I think Quebec should suck English up, it's the only language one must know in order to succeed *depending on what you wanna do* and English is just a horrible language to have as second, so I think Quebec should accept its Canadian nation and get rid of French, since France didn't entirely colonize Canada, and they'd INDEED need English anywhere out of Quebec. The government might provide paperwork in French, but I doubt all single employee speaks flawless or even intermediate French, or that people at the store in Vancouver speak French, or at the movie theatre etc. If you wanna live in Quebec forever or France one day maybe, then yeah, why learning English, but I still think Quebec should get rid of French, it's a beautiful language, but English is way more important and in MY OPINION, it's way much nicer/simpler/greater.

AnneDunn
AnneDunn

@kiki1998  I don't suppose you see anything wrong with it ... But it is wrong nevertheless.   The lack of Available English is hurting the economy in Quebec.  The language restrictions go much further than signs, It affects computer usage and software, it affects the workers themselves , by restricting what language you can speak 'On the Job"..  It is now going to affect 'Trademarks"  of foreign business.   Quebec wants the business to apply French to these , because any other language is 'Offensive"   their is more much more.    this will never end ..thousands of people are employed to go around inspecting signs.  these people also receive complaints for something or other , and go and inspect , and fine if they deem it serious enough.    this will never end . it occupies the governments time more than anything else.  People are leaving , Businesses are leaving or going bankrupt..  No 'New" business want to come here...and if this weren't enough , the threat of "Separation " is back on the agenda... which puts the final nail in the coffin.... Quebec will never be satisfied unless and until the rest of the 'aliens" have been kicked out .   that is the reality here.   It will never be enough , we can never do enough. We will never ever be able to live together here because the radical element of the French Population will never accept anything less than their 'Own country"   .  that is the reality of Quebec today.   and so it goes , on and on...everyday we are a little more poorer, our health services are suffering , our infrastructure is in a state of being so bad , and we don't have the cash to fix it.  We pay the highest taxes in north America, and the bulk of the tax payers are 'English and ethnic.   so go figure , the French want us gone , and when we do the place will collapse.   Go figure..

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ChristainBenedict

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DontWorryAboutIt
DontWorryAboutIt

Oh FFS. All this over a language? I am sure it's possible to keep your history and culture even if you started speaking English. However, this IS Canada. English AND French are our official languages. So how about we get over this silly nonsense and teach BOTH languages in schools as mandatory teachings across the country? Then the next generation will know both and as adults can decide which they would rather speak. That way Quebec can stop feeling threatened that they will lose their language, and the kids of tomorrow will have at least two languages to put on their resume.

kiki1998
kiki1998

@DontWorryAboutIt We as francophone we are losing are language! we are proud to be french and we will do anything to protect are language! Je suis francophone est j'aimerai vous dire que le québec a raison a passer une lois sur notre langue!! Nos some fière est nos enfants aura le choix de parler l'Anglais mais on tien beaucoup a coeur notre langue!! 

ssmith008
ssmith008

@kiki1998 @DontWorryAboutIt But Kiki1998, you can't even spell the language properly!  Je suis anglophone mais même moi, je connais, c'est "noUs somMeS fierS...ET...AURONT...TIENT..."

melanieclark_4
melanieclark_4

@kiki1998 @DontWorryAboutIt You are doing it the wrong way! Je suis québécoise de naissance, de Saint-Hyacinthe, et je trouve ridicule de ne pas avoir la chance de faire visiter notre coin de pays à mon mari, parce qu'il est américain. Si on a à coeur de donner le choix à nos enfants, cette fille de montérégie a eu la chance de recontrer son âme soeur aux États-Unis et j'aimerais bien que vous lui donniez la chance de voir toutes les merveilles de notre province. Parce que j'en suis fière... mais pas autant de vous!

Enirdas1
Enirdas1

@DontWorryAboutIt That was Trudeau's dream but it proved to be inpossible to do it  in the REAL WORLD.  I can't understand why a kid who lives one hour north of Edmonton should have to learn French when everybody knows that he will  never use it again and also probably never hear anyone speaking French in his life....All that with the taxpayer's money at a moment where we don't have any money to spare....

DennysMorley
DennysMorley

@kiki1998 @DontWorryAboutIt Quebecoirs speak a weird French, it sounds broken. LMAO And I don't think you guys need to protect the language, it is not going anywhere, as long as people make sure their next generation speaks French. Poor kids though, English is a terrible language to have as second. I am lucky it's my first. :)

ssmith008
ssmith008

@kiki1998 @DontWorryAboutIt My point being that if I could take the time to learn French well despite growing up in a non-Francophone environment, you should have the same respect for the English language and learn it well, too...c'est l'égalité.  You're not going to be able to do it, this way...by banning it.

Fedup1
Fedup1

Montreal and metropolitan area must be removed from the Quebec jurisdiction to form either a city state or the eleventh province of Canada

beproudandhaveasay
beproudandhaveasay

Nobody cares what the French think. It's Canada, speak English. You can't separate, it's Canadian soil which means if you want out of Canada, then leave. I don't know why we have to put up with that stupid way of thinking. The Canadian government should just tell the separatist people to get the heck out of our Country. Why do we always have to be so nice to everybody that has no interest or love for Canada. I live in Calgary and there is few restaurants now that put the required, as per recipe, bacon bits on the caesar salad. Whatever you do, don't offend the muslims. Pretty soon we won't be able to get pork in a restaurant. I am a proud Canadian who is sick of watching my Country being invaded from letting our enemies in our back door. These people think we are very stupid for letting them get away with everything and their right. Try going to their home muslim country and telling them to change their schools and traditions to suit your needs and wants. All I can say is that if it is a foreign or domestic threat, let's start manning up and save our Country for our future generations. We need people in government that want to protect our Country's people and traditions instead of not offending anybody because they want to get re-elected to get more easy money and a good pension. Come on fellow Canadians, take a stand.

kiki1998
kiki1998

@beproudandhaveasay hey im a french canadien that live in ontario i strongly believe that québec is trying to protect the are language! Also use french people theirs alot of people who judge us because we are french! Well as a francophone i believe that Québec is aloud to protect are language!! Also ur saying that canada should tell the separatist people to get the heck out of our country it not right! Like u said it canada we have the right to think what we want! 

WorldBystander
WorldBystander

P.S. Nevertheless I deeply sympathise with a nation's desire to strengthen the use of its language and protect it from being assimilated in another more dominant language that surrounds it, like French in mostly English-speaking North America.

WorldBystander
WorldBystander

"French in the Canadian province is the most regulated language in the world" Close, but not true. LATVIAN in Latvia would arguably win this nomination. In that country 40 % of the population have Russian as their native/most commonly used language, yet it's considered to be a foreign language like, e.g., Chinese or Swahili. There's a very tough language regulation in place, and the State Language Centre terrorises the Russian-speaking populace or companies with huge fines. The pinnacle of these policies has been the language centre forbidding the govt to distribute cancer prevention info leaflets in Russian.

AKEBTW
AKEBTW

I love Quebec, it does everything in its power to destroy business, welcome non-skilled refugees from French speaking colonies who become a burden to welfare system and bureaucratic corrupt government that fixes nothing in their cities but keep asking for higher taxes every year. One thing they do their upmost is to maintain language demagoguery. I guarantee you in 10 years Quebec will be an economic wasteland to which tax payers fuel language laws and nothing else. Quebec is the Florida of USA, the Belgium of Europe. Hated by everyone for their retarded laws that help no one in the process.


Quebec has no culture like most of Canada, culture was destroyed with wiping out american Indians. What we have left are opportunist Europeans who settled in these lands to MAKE MONEY. Priority in every city should be incentives to bring jobs and employment and efficient infrastructure. If your city isn't doing neither it means they failed the american system.


This whole French nonsense has nothing to do with French identity and all has to do with a few old grumpy French people outside of Montreal who DON'T WANT TO LEARN ENGLISH.


If the youth are leaving this city it's because Quebec doing everything possible to make the process of getting a job futile, This in turn makes matters worse because if universities are subsidised, that subsidy has to be paid with future taxes and if the students after graduating are leaving, it means those taxes need to be increased.


If not for the immigrants who migrated to Quebec in 70s-80s, French Quebecois would be nothing but bunch of pig farmers.


MarcLévesque
MarcLévesque

Simply because Quebec has the civil code and Canada the common law does not make Quebec a thrid world state. It is the second highest GDP earning province in Canada. The cost of living - despite taxes- is much lower than Ontario and BC. The only provinces with positive immigration within Canada are BC and Alberta - all others are losing people for the past decade (google it). Most of your arguments are drivel the english media serve their population to bash Qc.

j-avery
j-avery

@AKEBTW I agree with everything you said except for "Quebec has no culture like most of Canada". Let me guess, you've never been to Quebec, right? Quebec has more culture than all Canadian provinces put together. Quebec has personality unlike the dull, boring and bland Canadians. English speaking Canada is simply a more boring version of the United States. Canada has no culture.

RobertPeterson1
RobertPeterson1

@MarcLévesque Wrong, Québec is ranked about ninth in per-capita GDP amongst Canadian provinces--just above the poor maritime provinces--and it has the second lowest per capita disposal income in Canada!  Québec by any measure is poor.  The picture gets worse when it's ranked amongst all US states and Canadians provinces.  It's one of the poorest, in the company of Mississippi and others.


Combine that economic reality with draconian language laws and a completely unwelcoming/narcissistic culture, a pretty horrible winter climate, and those are some of the reasons why new immigrants leave.


I know many Quebecois in BC and California who admit this reality and sought lives elsewhere.

ferreira-999
ferreira-999

Your facts are all wrong buddy, stop spreading your waste.

ferreira-999
ferreira-999

Oh really? Which French culture are u referring to? Because I live in quebec and French quebecer culture is nothing more than a barely recognizable version of French and a few menu choices.

Enirdas1
Enirdas1

@ferreira-999 it is sad to see that you live in Quebec and never understood anything about it. Like many Anglos in Quebec they keep their mind shut, whine and do Quebec bashing...