Ethiopia’s Plan to Dam the Nile Has Egypt Fuming

  • Share
  • Read Later
ASMAA WAGUIH / REUTERS

Young couple on the banks of the river Nile on the outskirts of Cairo, May 6, 2013.

The heat is stifling but the construction workers and red-hatted engineers don’t let up. Mechanized excavators batter into the mighty, arid peaks on either side of the site of Ethiopia’s Grand Renaissance dam, set to be the largest in Africa. The foundations are growing. The dark brown waters of the Nile River flow through the site. But the punishing sun and tough terrain aren’t the only challenges facing the dam’s progress. Downstream, Egypt is furious — and some politicians there have talked in private of war. Ethiopia is defiant. “There is nothing that will stop Ethiopia now from realizing our country’s dream,” says Bereket Simon, an Ethiopian government spokesman, as he walked around the site on a recent morning.

The Ethiopian government believes that the dam, which is due to start generating electricity next year and will be paid for from the proceeds of government bond sales, will become an image of national pride and a symbol of the country’s recent development. Egypt, a country whose identity and economy are already inseparable from the Nile, feels deeply threatened by the project. Egypt’s President Mohammed Morsi said in a speech in Cairo on June 10, “We will defend each drop of the Nile with our blood,” but he has also said that dialogue is the best means of solving the crisis. Not all of Egypt’s politicians have been so diplomatic; during a cabinet meeting on June 3, which was being broadcast by Egyptian state TV without the knowledge of the political figures attending, several told Morsi that he must destroy the dam through any means available.

(MORE: ‘No Glimmers of Hope’: Two Years After Egypt’s Revolution, an Economic Crisis Looms)

On June 18 tempers seemed to calm a little when the Ethiopian foreign minister met his Egyptian counterpart in Addis Ababa, afterwards saying relations remained “brotherly” and that the two men had agreed to conduct further studies to ascertain the likely future impact of the dam on all countries through which the river flows. But the specter of a regional conflict remains. In February, Saudi Arabia’s deputy defense minister was harshly critical of the dam project. “The Dam is being built close to the Sudanese border for political plotting rather than for economic gain and constitutes a threat to Egyptian and Sudanese national security,” said Prince Khaled bin Sultan, the deputy minister. “Ethiopia is hell-bent on harming Arab peoples.” (Bin Sultan was dismissed by the Saudi king in April; it is unclear whether there is any connection between his dismissal and his comments about the dam). On Ethiopia’s side, both South Sudan and Uganda recently said Egypt should not undermine Ethiopia’s right to the Nile.

The challenge Ethiopia faces is to persuade not just the Egyptian government but a whole nation that appears convinced right now that Ethiopia is about to plug the Nile. There is no geographical feature of Egypt more important to its people. As the Greek historian, Herodotus, put it in 50 B.C., Egypt is the “gift of the Nile.” Extremely arid and lacking in rainfall, Egypt has always relied heavily on the Nile for its freshwater. Following Sudan’s independence, Egypt negotiated with Sudan in 1959 that it would have rights to over 14,500 billion gallons per year of the Nile’s flow, leaving over 488 billion gallons for Sudan, and less for the upstream states — Ethiopia, Uganda, Rwanda, Kenya, Tanzania and Burundi. Ethiopia was not party to these talks, and many Egyptians now see the new dam as a way for Ethiopia to bypass the agreement, control the Nile, and gain leverage over Cairo. For Ethiopia and Egypt, whose populations are predicted to grow steeply in the coming years, the water of the Nile and how they use it could determine whether they can cater for the demands of their fast growing populations.

Experts differ on whether the dam will, in fact, negatively impact the Nile. According to Dia El-Quosy, the former chairman of Egypt’s National Water Research Centre, the dam will reduce water flow anywhere from 1,300 billion gallons to 6,600 billion gallons per year. El-Quosy also argues that the reduction in water flow would increase pollution in the river and harm the fisheries in Egypt, as well as making it difficult for ferries and other boats to navigate the river. Another serious concern, el-Quosy says, is the possible reduction in fertility for farmland along the banks of the river that could be caused by the dam holding back nutrient-rich salts. He claims that every 260 billion gallon reduction in water flow created by the dam will mean half a million farmers lose their farms. “So if we lose 30bn kilolitres (8,000 billion gallons) in water flow, that would mean losing 25% of Egypt’s cultivated land,” he says.

(MORE: Ethiopia Faces Dangers but Also Opportunities in Meles Succession)

Not all experts, though, agree that the dam necessarily spells disaster for the downstream states of Sudan and Egypt. According to Professor Dale Whittington, an expert on the Nile’s hydropower potential, hydropower dams do not generally consume water. “After the reservoir behind the Grand Renaissance Dam is filled, the dam will not reduce the total water supply available to Egypt and Sudan,” he says. Whittington also says, however, that Ethiopia needs to recognize that Egypt has legitimate concerns about how Ethiopia will operate the Grand Renaissance Dam. If Ethiopia attempted to fill the dam’s reservoir during years of drought and at a time when there was little water stored in Egypt’s Aswan High Dam Reservoir, for example, this would seriously reduce Egypt’s water supplies at a crucial time. “Similarly, during a multi-year drought in the Nile basin, Egypt needs guarantees that Ethiopia will not act strategically to withhold water, but instead will coordinate the operation of the Grand Renaissance Dam with Egypt’s Aswan High Dam in order to minimize the costs of the drought on all the” countries through which the Nile flows, said Whittington.

Although the Egyptian government has been highly vocal in its opposition to the dam, Sudan appears to support the project. “Our government is mostly positive about the dam,” says Alhajj Hamad, a Khartoum-based political analyst. “There is a small minority of Islamists who feel they should back their Islamist brothers in Cairo but mostly our government is being pragmatic and sees the benefits.” Experts have noted that the dam could reduce sediment flows down the Nile, which would increase the lifespan of hydropower dams in Sudan, of which there are six, mostly built during colonial times. It would also reduce the fertility of Sudan’s farmlands, however. “No one is sure quite yet,” said one Sudanese water official. Although Egypt also has two dams on the Nile, which could coordinate with Ethiopia’s dam to efficiently regulate water flow, it is the size of Ethiopia’s dam that is irking Egypt — and the perceived secrecy by which the dam is being built.

In spite of the uncertainty surrounding the dam project — and its potential to create friction in the region – it could ultimately turn out to bring greater harmony to the countries through which the Nile flows. “If transparency is increased then this dam can be a great opportunity for the region to work together,” says Cleo Paskal, a specialist in water and food security at London’s Chatham House think tank. “Ethiopia will now be a stakeholder of the Nile and it will be in all the countries’ interests to increase dialogue and to protect the river in a way that benefits all.”

MORE: The Saga of Sinai: A Neglected Hotspot Egypt’s Morsi Must Not Let Explode

51 comments
ghtrs
ghtrs

Well its amaizing how a country who has absultly no logical claim to the water could be so egotistical and disrespectfull towards the people who hold all the cards even thought they are poor and not a big threat at the moment there is a saying in Ethiopia '' when a lion gets old the flies will play on his mane'' i think its time that Egyptians reevaluate their methods and resort to BEGGING and supporting Ethiopia otherwise there will be a real threat coming even if not in the near future soon enough they will be sorry for all the unhealthy methods they are choosing to employ at the moment , and Egyptians from a freindly Ethiopian to you guys it is embarrasing what you are doing its cowardly you know you have no respect right because you are like dogs who shout after the hayena who has already left just because he sees his owners there!!!!!!!!!!!!!!  colonial agreement come on be real men show some courrage show your children, the future generation what its means to be brave real people its shame full the Egyptians haven't seen these qualities in 3000 years

kibalem
kibalem

@shukrysir 

Why some of irresponsible Egyptians and its puppets become very rapacious in using the Blue Nile River for the sake of Egypt only? 

It is very well known that more than 85% of the river is originated from Ethiopia. However, Egypt has a lion share on this resource. As far as my opinion is concerned, this is unfair.

On the other hand, Ethiopia has been severely suffering from recurring drought and poverty for many years.
Since ten years ago, the country has been striving for the achievement of remarkable growth and development. In addition to this, the government has been implementing its five year's Growth and Transformation Plan since two years ago.
Thus, to attain all of its developmental goals, requiring of huge energy is inevitable.
Let's look at some facts.
Currently, at least 10,000 MW of electric power needs the country. This is not even sufficient to accelerate its developmental activities very fast as the minimum consumption of one industry is more than 300 MW of power to produce at full capacity. But the most miserable thing is that the country's current power is not more than 2200MW.
That is why it has started the construction of its dam at Blue Nile River two years ago for the generation of hydroelectric power. The experts group who delegated by the upper and lower streaming countries to conduct an assessment on the impact of the dam have also assured on their report that it has no any negative impact on the down streaming countries.
However, some of the conservative Egyptians and their puppets are still very rigid on their stands though they clearly know all of the above mentioned facts.
The Ethiopians and the Egyptians have a very long time friendship history. Thus, there is no need any unwanted conflict in between them. The resource is very sufficient for the down streaming countries if they efficiently and responsibly utilize it. All of them can be mutually benefited from the river.
Otherwise, waging for unnecessary conflict and/or war is not be a solution. No one will be benefited from it. Especially, the two countries have their own ancient and modern histories and even those conservative Egyptians know the Ethiopians very well.
Apart from this, conflict is not a solution in this contemporary world, especially, in the 21st century. The best solution is being transparent and conducting genuine cooperation overwhelmingly and amicably. Though the Ethiopians are united together in the Engineering and in all the construction activities of the Grand Renaissance Dam, the down streaming countries including Egypt should also support the project. This will enable them to get constantly flowing water throughout the year. The environment protection, such as, afforestation and soil protection activities should also be performed especially on the upper streaming countries.
Generally speaking; as far as my opinion is concerned, exerting of all maximum efforts for peaceful collaboration is the best solution for all of the blue Nile river owners.
Let's work together for the well being of all the African Nations.
Let's abolish backwardness, poverty and conflict once and for all and let's build prosperous nation!!
I am African and I am the African Union!!
THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT FOR AFRICA!!!

kibalem
kibalem

Why some of irresponsible Egyptians and its puppets become very rapacious in using the Blue Nile River for the sake of Egypt only? 

It is very well known that more than 85% of the river is originated from Ethiopia. However, Egypt has a lion share on this resource. As far as my opinion is concerned, this is unfair.

On the other hand, Ethiopia has been severely suffering from recurring drought and poverty for many years.
Since ten years ago, the country has been striving for the achievement of remarkable growth and development. In addition to this, the government has been implementing its five year's Growth and Transformation Plan since two years ago.
Thus, to attain all of its developmental goals, requiring of huge energy is inevitable.
Let's look at some facts.
Currently, at least 10,000 MW of electric power needs the country. This is not even sufficient to accelerate its developmental activities very fast as the minimum consumption of one industry is more than 300 MW of power to produce at full capacity. But the most miserable thing is that the country's current power is not more than 2200MW.
That is why it has started the construction of its dam at Blue Nile River two years ago for the generation of hydroelectric power. The experts group who delegated by the upper and lower streaming countries to conduct an assessment on the impact of the dam have also assured on their report that it has no any negative impact on the down streaming countries.
However, some of the conservative Egyptians and their puppets are still very rigid on their stands though they clearly know all of the above mentioned facts.
The Ethiopians and the Egyptians have a very long time friendship history. Thus, there is no need any unwanted conflict in between them. The resource is very sufficient for the down streaming countries if they efficiently and responsibly utilize it. All of them can be mutually benefited from the river.
Otherwise, waging for unnecessary conflict and/or war is not be a solution. No one will be benefited from it. Especially, the two countries have their own ancient and modern histories and even those conservative Egyptians know the Ethiopians very well.
Apart from this, conflict is not a solution in this contemporary world, especially, in the 21st century. The best solution is being transparent and conducting genuine cooperation overwhelmingly and amicably. Though the Ethiopians are united together in the Engineering and in all the construction activities of the Grand Renaissance Dam, the down streaming countries including Egypt should also support the project. This will enable them to get constantly flowing water throughout the year. The environment protection, such as, afforestation and soil protection activities should also be performed especially on the upper streaming countries.
Generally speaking; as far as my opinion is concerned, exerting of all maximum efforts for peaceful collaboration is the best solution for all of the blue Nile river owners.
Let's work together for the well being of all the African Nations.
Let's abolish backwardness, poverty and conflict once and for all and let's build prosperous nation!!
I am African and I am the African Union!!
THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT FOR AFRICA!!!

abebawgetu
abebawgetu

it is responisibility of all ethiopian citizen so we have to stand  for abay dam by conitributes what we have !!

realist2urfce
realist2urfce

Nile  originates one section in Ethiopia so they have full rights to it. Egypt has been taking water for free till now based on some old colonial treaty with britian. No longer valid. Maybe Britian can give Egypt water from the Thames river.

Radandblue
Radandblue

Ethiopia has every right to do what it wish with in it's border. 85% Nile originate in Ethiopian and it belong to Ethiopia weather Egypt like or not. Talk about war....how the world Egypt get Ethiopian since both don't share border. The solution is Egypt should pay 2 billions per year to Ethiopian for the right the use the Ethiopian water. This is the best deal Egypt can afford to refuse.

Dasturdly
Dasturdly

REALITY CHECK, Egypt has an abundant supply of water; it’s called the Mediterranean.

Egypt can sell bonds and build desalination plants, same as many other countries (over 100) that operate such instillations. And maybe if they ask nicely, Ethiopia will sell them cheap and abundant electricity to run those plants.

This is all about getting free water, not lack of water.

AdaneKebede
AdaneKebede

The Egyptian government should apply the win-win approaches to use the Nile water efficiently. It’s obvious; all governments are working on the benefits of their own people. To ensure the need of their own people, Egypt should feel the problems of others. Unless simply indicating and discussing the issues based on articles 1959 cannot bring to solution. Please the Egyptian government; don’t ignore the voice of Africa that is AU. Think why AU? , I hope it is a good opportunity for you to internalize WHAT PAN- AFRICANISM IS.

dave111
dave111

Merowe and Roseires dams in Sudan built on the Nile river, mostly funded by Middle Eastern countries. Egypt didn't block those funds. 

Because of Egypt interference, no country in Middle East or in West wants to fund Ethiopian dams. Egypt doesn't want to see black Africans' life improved, as a result Egypt still blocks any financing from World and other banks. This can be a great evidence how Egypt hate and harm black Africans for its selfish and arrogant interest.

If Egypt continues this dirty work instead of cooperation,  it will bring the distraction of Egypt. Africans will divert the Nile river to Red Sea to punish Egypt's racism act, if she doesn't stop her evil work. To avoid this, Egypt has to stop blocking funds and harming Africans. 

mek.bekele
mek.bekele

First of all, Egyptian should acknowledge that the Nile doesn't exclusively belong to Egypt. If fair and equitable use of the Nile waters is not accepted by Egypt, the arrogant and bullying mindset could result in the biggest human catastrophe in Egypt. African countries are not Egyptian colonies. The Nile belongs to all the countries where it flows through, regardless of Egypt’s complete reliance on Nile as its major source of water. Egyptian government should apologize to the people and government of Ethiopia for the stupid and mad bravado of president Morsi and some of Egyptian politicians. African countries should benefit from Nile waters. That is their resource. If Egypt could have less water when other African countries exercise their right to use the water in a fair and equitable manner, Egypt could invest money in building desalination plants to alleviate any possible water shortage. Many countries have shortage of some kind of resources Egypt is surrounded by Mediterranean Sea and Red Sea. A few billions of dollars of investment in desalination could bring lasting solution and peace.

Ras_Mitat
Ras_Mitat

TOXIC MEDIA...The article purposely omits the joint international panel report of eight water experts (4 Westerners, 2 Egyptians and 2 Ethiopians) who submitted a long-term study concluding the Grand Renaissance dam will not negatively impact Sudan or Egypt.

riccismiles
riccismiles

Lets see how the USA helps out with this one. Egypt is a long time ally. We even help them hide terrorist. LOL.. I hope this doesnt lead to blood in the streets.. but it is east Africa so get the body bags ready.

MaryBiniam
MaryBiniam

This could present the opportunity for true partnership among all upstream and downstream neighbors to work together and promote development and trade, it doesn't have to be the old and outworn approach of war and conflict.  War is too expensive and foolish!

aMHazing7
aMHazing7

@TIME @TIMEWorld I find this to be absolutely ridiculous! Why does Egypt feel so entitled to the Nile when other countries such as Ethiopia-

aMHazing7
aMHazing7

@TIME So, it's perfectly fine for Egypt to have not 1 but 2 dams, but not okay for Ethiopia to have 1 on their own share of the Nile? C'mon.

weldeszx
weldeszx

More than 85 % of Nile originate from Ethiopia but Egypt claims more than 80% of the Nile based on the colonial era agreement which excludes all the upstream countries including Ethiopia. Anyhow Ethiopia will pave the way to  equitable water share by action to Egypt.

weldeszx
weldeszx

Egypt and Sudan have several dams on Nile river for their development and cause no impact on the water quality or quantity. So why don't Ethiopia build a dam on its natural river? Lets  be rational. 

AntoS905
AntoS905

@TIME @TIMEWorld with the current and long-term economic growth of the continent, where the Nile flows through, there it will be dammed.

ZemichaelM
ZemichaelM

i assure u no challenge now comes from Egypt in this dam construction-we are doing it-and some of them are keeping their old talking that Egypt is the gift of god. if they want to stop it by war-we aren't afraid.  only dialogue bring a best result for Egypt. 

ZakSai
ZakSai

I, just about finished watching clips of Egyptians enjoying the Nile on La Repbulica ( a major Italian news paper).  I think considering that the Nile is so important to them, in every sense, they should be genuine in negotiating, in good faith, with Ethiopia. This said, this article has to be one of the most balanced in any media in the US, Ethiopians have been talking for over a decade and a half to get an amicable solution to this problem of ' fair and equitable share'. The Egyptians played footsie for almost two decades while readying every sabotage against the hand which fed and feeds them. They organised rebels, financed Eritrean rebels and caused so much harm to Ethiopia, no wonder, there is little sympathy to these 'hustlers'  who openly stated their contempt for Ethiopia and USA live on tv. Despite the two having been the main  pillars of their very survival. The US, since the Suez Canal fiasco, when President Ike sided with Egypt against its allies- France and England and Ethiopia whose water and silt have nourished the Egyptians for thousands of years. Egypt is not a poor country, it has oil, gas and gets billions in subsidies by Gulf Arabs and the US, it can always approach Ethiopia with a ' counter proposal' to mellow the effect of the Dam. But it is acting foolishly, given its negative imprints on Ethiopia;- from having polluted Ethiopians' mindset through its ' copt bishops, sponsered by respective Khlifats to that of financing enemies of the State in the latter stage of the last Century. Ethiopians will never forget the crimes committed by Egyptians but we are willing to forgo our self- interest and take their ' selfish interest' while building a dam whose benefit to Egypt outweighs more than to Ethiopia. We got lands to till but the millions unemployed in Egypt need electricity to gain employment  We are willing to sell it to them at reasonable price. If they are smart, they will have the cake and eat it too, for the current gov t in Ethiopia all but give its right cheek after they slapped its left. Any other govt would have summoned an emergency meeting of the UN Security Council and others.  They got to reciprocate if there is any rational politicians left in Egypt. Habeshas are patient, but they are shrewd and calculated and will match the Khalifatt's assalut buck for buck

drewsg1
drewsg1

@TIME @TIMEWorld LOL Egypt is mad. This isnt the early 20th century when colonialist robbed Ethiopia of water that passed through THEIR land

EgymarriageOmneya
EgymarriageOmneya

We Egyptian are extremely worried about this dam. We want the best for Ethiopia, it is her legal right to develop the country, but not to our misfortune. Of course this has to be carefully examined by expert and we can go to the UN for help and arbitration.

destaleme
destaleme

all reporters are greedy to get focus by demonstrating factious idea to flutter audience. Ethiopia is not in a position to hurt anyone the GRD that has been under construction is to the benefit of all. I ashamed of by those who still think as colonial era lords who crashed by Ethiopians. so, all concerned parts need to come together and benefit all.

markosa03
markosa03

You don't have another song? It is no more plan, but completed over 25%, and expected to benefit all (including Egypt). Egypt foreign minister accepted the construction of the Dam, and your repeated calling for war is groundless.

tesfu
tesfu

by tesfu 

this is my always question .why the world undermine the value of water,while  gas has got respect all over z world since water and gas are both natural gift. Z water is given as gas has been given te egypt . what wrong has etiopia done rather than keeping its  water as egypt is using its natural gift -z gas?


Asmerom_Zenawi
Asmerom_Zenawi

@Radandblue There are international treaties governing rivers that cross borders. The best solution is a win win one where all countries on the river basin mutually benefit. I believe this is achievable and is merely a technical issue. 

Minte
Minte

@dave111 Come on man - sober up! No one in Africa wants to hurt Egypt. You are adding problems to an already problematic situation. There is no rain in Egypt - the Nile river is their life line. What we are saying is there are also a lot of ways  where upstream countries can also benefit from the river with out hurting the benefits of Sudan and Egypt. Being hostile to each other is damaging to everyone!

Matthews
Matthews

@Ras_Mitat "Good thing our viewers are dumb as doorknobs or else we would be in trouble." ~ Rupert Murdoch, Billionaire media mogul.

Minte
Minte

@Ras_Mitat I wonder if it is purposefully but that is a major story to miss. The Panel also included Sudanese experts. The article has also brought opinions from one of the heavy weight experts of the Nile Basin who did extensive research on win-win equitable use and who could not necessarily be biased because they are not from the region.

Minte
Minte

@riccismiles Egypt is a US ally in principle. Ethiopia is a US ally in practice!

kibalem
kibalem

@EgymarriageOmneya 

Why some of irresponsible Egyptians and its puppets become very rapacious in using the Blue Nile River for the sake of Egypt only? 

It is very well known that more than 85% of the river is originated from Ethiopia. However, Egypt has a lion share on this resource. As far as my opinion is concerned, this is unfair.

On the other hand, Ethiopia has been severely suffering from recurring drought and poverty for many years.
Since ten years ago, the country has been striving for the achievement of remarkable growth and development. In addition to this, the government has been implementing its five year's Growth and Transformation Plan since two years ago.
Thus, to attain all of its developmental goals, requiring of huge energy is inevitable.
Let's look at some facts.
Currently, at least 10,000 MW of electric power needs the country. This is not even sufficient to accelerate its developmental activities very fast as the minimum consumption of one industry is more than 300 MW of power to produce at full capacity. But the most miserable thing is that the country's current power is not more than 2200MW.
That is why it has started the construction of its dam at Blue Nile River two years ago for the generation of hydroelectric power. The experts group who delegated by the upper and lower streaming countries to conduct an assessment on the impact of the dam have also assured on their report that it has no any negative impact on the down streaming countries.
However, some of the conservative Egyptians and their puppets are still very rigid on their stands though they clearly know all of the above mentioned facts.
The Ethiopians and the Egyptians have a very long time friendship history. Thus, there is no need any unwanted conflict in between them. The resource is very sufficient for the down streaming countries if they efficiently and responsibly utilize it. All of them can be mutually benefited from the river.
Otherwise, waging for unnecessary conflict and/or war is not be a solution. No one will be benefited from it. Especially, the two countries have their own ancient and modern histories and even those conservative Egyptians know the Ethiopians very well.
Apart from this, conflict is not a solution in this contemporary world, especially, in the 21st century. The best solution is being transparent and conducting genuine cooperation overwhelmingly and amicably. Though the Ethiopians are united together in the Engineering and in all the construction activities of the Grand Renaissance Dam, the down streaming countries including Egypt should also support the project. This will enable them to get constantly flowing water throughout the year. The environment protection, such as, afforestation and soil protection activities should also be performed especially on the upper streaming countries.
Generally speaking; as far as my opinion is concerned, exerting of all maximum efforts for peaceful collaboration is the best solution for all of the blue Nile river owners.
Let's work together for the well being of all the African Nations.
Let's abolish backwardness, poverty and conflict once and for all and let's build prosperous nation!!
I am African and I am the African Union!!
THE FUTURE IS BRIGHT FOR AFRICA!!!

sisay
sisay

@EgymarriageOmneya Ethiopia supplies about 86% of the water. You do not pays us nothing for that because you are the nation of Nile and have historic, natural and stunningly colonial right. Let alone paying us for our fresh water, you are opposing the construction of the dam, which is meant for only hydro power.  Your underming includes the live debate you made to stop the construction of the dam. Anyway we construct the Dam.

Minte
Minte

@EgymarriageOmneya I donot know why our brothers in Egypt are so unreasonable. No one in Ethiopia wants to hurt you. We know you have no rain and you need the water. For that we let it flow. But we expect you to show thoughtfulness for the poor farmers in Ethiopian highlands where the water is coming from. They are poor and do not even have electricity and their small-holder rain-fed agriculture makes them insecure every time the rain fails. So the best solution is for Ethiopia to generate electricity and industrialize. That means we do not demand much from irrigation. You get the water and the Ethiopian farmers get jobs from factories. Everyone wins! Wise thinking and integrated management of the water basin-wide might even fetch you even more water - just be thoughtful for everyone! We are all children of the Nile - collaboration is the key!

markosa03
markosa03

@EgymarriageOmneya  My friend, Ethiopia do not have the moral, legal and even the capacity to retain the huge Nile water. We have several other rivers suitable for irrigation, and the dam is just for generation of Hydro-power, from which Egypt can benefit, in addition to the Aswan. If I were an Egyptian leader, I would strive to own the dam by investment share in the Dam. For me, Egypt can secure the water only by supporting the Dam and coming to the new Nile Initiative Treaty.

Radandblue
Radandblue

@Asmerom_Zenawi@Radandblue Tell that to Egypt that it is just merely a technical issue. BTW Ethiopian should not respect a treaty which didn't agreed to or part off. plus any treaty has it's on loophole which  Ethiopian can exploit it to it's benefit.

Globeship
Globeship

@Minte  Dia El-Quosy, the former chairman of Egypt’s National Water Research Center, is not an "independent" expert on this issue. And Professor Dale Whittington was quoted only on worst case scenarios, not on actual fact that Ethiopia repeatedly stated it'll take five years to slowly fill the dam reservoir, so as not to impact downstream countries.

Morsi, like Mubarak, just looking for usual excuses to distract from domestic problems.

sisay
sisay

@Minte @EgymarriageOmneya I do not think it is difficult for them to know and think in this way. What makes them blind is they always think they are superior to us in diplomacy and military. Now we want win -win solution.

Minte
Minte

@Globeship @Minte I only meant Dale Whittington when I say unbiased. But yeah, you have a point!

Minte
Minte

@sisay @Minte @EgymarriageOmneya There has been massive indoctrination and propaganda in Egypt about 'historical right', 'our share of the Nile' in the last few decades particularly. It is understandable if they feel insecure. A lot of work has to be done to let the Egyptian public understand that the water will not be affected in such a way that affects their lives. Most of the Egyptian media is completely irresponsible - only little sane voices we have heard from them so far!