Lesus Christ! Vatican Misspells “Jesus” on 6,000 Papal Medals

What would "Lesus" do?

  • Share
  • Read Later

The Italian State Mint needs a better spellcheck program.

The Vatican had to withdraw more than 6,000 papal medals that went on sale Tuesday which spelled “Jesus” as “Lesus.”

The Telegraph reports that four medallions, commemorating the beginning of Pope Francis’ papacy, were sold before the typo was noticed and the coin went off the market.

As expected, the Twitterverse was quite amused.

Get ready for the #WWLD hashtag.

[Telegraph]

22 comments
Chaz
Chaz

No ... "IESVS" is how Jesus would be spelled in Latin.

edwardsmythe1970
edwardsmythe1970

Umm, actually, no.  LESVS is the way Jesus would be spelt in Latin. 

billy131274
billy131274

The Vatican was infested by Satan ages ago anyway.

KarlPietrowski
KarlPietrowski

Who cares? What an aweful waste of time and money. Religion rots the brain, and instead of spending the money on something useful like ending world hunger, and child molestation efforts in the Vatican, they spend it on money? If all the religions around the world gave up all their "riches" and churches, we could end starvation, and fund the efforts to cure AIDS and cancer. Whats worse? billions of people have been fooled by this garbage.

wesswind
wesswind

CAN TOU SAY..."eBay"...... collectables..... ! 

.......

They really should just pretend it is about the discovery and returning of "Jesus's  long lost "brother" Lesus, because right now even he can use all the help he can get...!

BradWilliams
BradWilliams

It is a Latin inscription. "J" does not exist. I am not sure which is the more ignorant. Time, or the person that made the recall. The correct spelling is "Lesvs"!

tono-bungay
tono-bungay

A typo in a story about a typo?  The correct spelling in Latin is Iesus spelled with an i not a j.

YehudaElyada
YehudaElyada

Nothing new about Christian misspelling a Jewish name. The guy was born Jewish and named Yeshu'a in Hebrew. He spoke mainly Aramaic (the lingua franca of his time in the Galilee) so most contemporaries knew him as Yeshu. When his disciples started marketing the New Judaism to their Greek speaking neighbors, the name was "Hellenized" into Jesus. 300 years latter Latin replaced Greek as the new Holy Languish in order to distance the now Roman faith from the old Jewish version, but the name Jesus stuck. For the new believers, Roman, Greek, Germans and Franks, Celts and Slavs, these fine distinctions were immaterial - as long as nobody called Jesus a Jew!

bman61z
bman61z

The Lesus I know wouldn't allow this to happen.

HeidiMorgan
HeidiMorgan

What do you bet those FOUR escaped medals become priceless!

widtap
widtap

@YehudaElyada  Pronounced Djah-EE-zus (three syllables) in many parts of the US.

BradWilliams
BradWilliams

@YehudaElyada It is a Latin inscription. "J" does not exist. I am not sure which is the more ignorant. Time, or the person that made the recall. The correct spelling is "Lesvs"!

YesterdaysWine
YesterdaysWine

@YehudaElyada Another grievance... there are a thousand name changes/pronunciation changes that have gone on in history. And they keep going on. Do you think Hebrew, ancient or modern, pronounces "Socrates" as did the ancient Greeks? When speaking English would you call Rome "Roma" as the Italians do? What a foolish old man you seem. What do you care, anyway, if you're Jewish and not terribly enthralled with Jesus in the first place? Call Jesus "Yeshu'a" till the cows come home. No one cares. 

YehudaElyada
YehudaElyada

@YesterdaysWine @YehudaElyada You're right, I don't care. We, Hebrew speakers, call Jesus "Yeshu" and Rome "Roma" - but do not insist that you do the same. We even don't care when you call Yerushalayim "Jerusalem" and Israel "Palestine". Still, it is worth noting that Jesus was Jewish (and an observant one), Christianity was born out of the ambition to replace Jerusalem with Rome and produce a new, non-Jewish priesthood, and the he would live to be a Rabi if he didn't insist on provoking the Roman imperialists at a very vulnerable period (when Jerusalem was chockfull of Passover pilgrims, and the bored Roman Legionnaires stationed at the Antonia Fortress overlooking the Temple court, waiting for the slightest public disturbance that can be used to justify a massacre).