Pope Francis Denounces ‘Idolatry of Money’ And ‘Tyranny’ of Capitalism

The Vatican released an 84-page document airing the platform of the Pope.

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Pope Francis, who has made alleviating poverty a central pillar of his papacy, criticized the “idolatry of money” in the global economy and denounced the unfettered free market as the “new tyranny.”

“How can it be that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure, but it is news when the stock market loses 2 points?” Pope Francis asked in an anticipated 84-page report airing the views of the Vatican, known as the apostolic exhortation and released Tuesday.

The report aligns with — and in some cases goes further than — the Pope’s progressive and reformist positions since he was elected in March. The pontiff criticizes the unequal distribution of wealth and calls for greater action to help the poor.

“I beg the Lord to grant us more politicians who are genuinely disturbed by the state of society, the people, the lives of the poor,” he writes.

Read the full document, called the the Evangelii Gaudium (“Joy of the Gospel”), on the Vatican’s website.

8 comments
Edohiguma
Edohiguma

He sits on wealth of estimated 10 to 15 BILLION USD. He lives in a palace. He has servants. But he cries about "evil capitalism" and the "tyranny of money". He also cries about the illegals who died at Lampedusa, but I don't see the Vatican taking them in.

At least capitalists work for their money. Unlike this hypocrite. But what to expect from the "leader" of a worthless cult.

KiAllanson
KiAllanson

It is about time that someone acknowledges that capitalism and Christianity are incompatible.  He must have read the Hebrew Prophets.  They condemn the Israelites for the unequal distribution of wealth.  

downpour
downpour

It's a shame they love their ridiculous cult more than they care about protecting children from pedophiles.

BruceMorganWilliams
BruceMorganWilliams

The day he walks away from Vatican City with nothing but the clothes on his back is the day I  become a Catholic (again).  

DeanJackson
DeanJackson

"The pontiff criticizes the unequal distribution of wealth and calls for greater action to help the poor."


Maybe Moscow's man in the Vatican should be more introspective as to the personal choices we all make that affects our future incomes. 

As for national differences in wealth, one should look to a nation's economic policies. Does the nation expropriate wealth or discourage investment. Most former European colonies were well-feed, exporting nations, increasing in wealth until de-colonization became the rage. Immediately upon independence, those former European colonies sunk into ethnic strife and government-induced poverty; one can control the population if the nation is poor and the state controls the means of production.






Channah
Channah

If he feels this way, the Catholic Church should sell off all its wealth and give it to the poor of the world.  Someone who is head of the Catholic Church, with all its gaudy wealth, has no room to tell others what to do. 

mrbomb13
mrbomb13

Sooo...what exactly is Pope Francis advocating?

Instead of "unequal distribution of wealth," should there be equal distribution?  If so, how 'equal?'  Should it be mandated?  If so, how?  Forced redistribution of assets via the Soviet system, etc.?  The Pope needs to be careful there, especially since one of his predecessors - Blessed Pope Emeritus John Paul II - was staunchly against such ideologies. 

Second, Francis should pay more attention to how modern economies function.  Modern nations redistribute wealth through taxation, entitlement programs (i.e. Social Security, Obamacare, etc.) back to its citizens.  Albeit, all of that wealth cannot go back to the poor, because the rich/richer could not invest in expansionary activities to drive the economy forward. 

Third, Francis should be careful not to come across as a hypocrite.  While disparaging Capitalism as some sort of disease(?!), he enjoys the riches/fruits of the Church's many labors.  He's not exactly putting the Vatican up for sale, and then donating all of the proceeds to The Salvation Army. 

 In other words, Francis should put his money where his mouth is before going off on others who engage in wealth-creating activities.