Thailand’s Democrat Party Is Hilariously Misnamed

Don't believe Yellow Shirt talk of a "people's revolution" — what's being demanded is nothing short of a putsch

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Damir Sagolj / Reuters

Suthep Thaugsuban, protest leader and former Deputy Prime Minister, acknowledges the crowd at the Democracy Monument in central Bangkok on Nov. 24, 2013

Thailand’s color-coded political strife has once again flared up. Yellow Shirt supporters of the Democrat Party have seized control of government ministries and departments in the Thai capital and occupied at least 19 provincial offices, demanding that Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra — backed by rival Red Shirts — step down. To the Yellow Shirts, the 46-year-old Yingluck is merely a stooge for her brother, exiled former Prime Minister Thaksin Shinawatra, a divisive figure ousted in a military coup in 2006 and sentenced in absentia to two years’ imprisonment for corruption.

The current wave of Yellow Shirt action stems from opposition to a now stalled amnesty bill that would have allowed Thaksin to return home, and an attempt by Yingluck to consolidate power by altering the composition of the Senate. On Tuesday, protest leader Suthep Thaugsuban, a former Democrat Party Deputy Prime Minister, repeated his call for a “people’s revolution” to replace the elected Yingluck administration with a nonelected royalist council. Attempting to downplay personal ambitions, Suthep declared “before the sanctity of Buddhism that I, Suthep Thaugsuban, will not be Prime Minister in the future.” A warrant has since been issued for his arrest for unlawfully entering government buildings.

(MORE: Thailand’s Color War: Why Red Hates Yellow)

So far, so histrionic. But what happens in Thailand is important. The kingdom is the sybaritic destination of millions of travelers every year. It is one of the world’s largest exporters of rice and the second largest economy in Southeast Asia. Even more significantly, Thai democracy is an important example to neighboring populations in Burma, Laos, Cambodia and Vietnam, which have long cast envious glances at their booming neighbor.

It’s just that when it comes to Thai democracy, the ironically named Democrat Party is among the worst practitioners. Tens of thousands of Yellow Shirts are marching across the country, but demanding the establishment of royalist councils is hardly a people’s revolution. If anyone has been exercising people power, it’s the 15 million voters who elected Yingluck and her Pheu Thai party in July 2011. Thaksin-backed political parties have won the previous five elections with significant majorities, and Thaksin’s own populist policies helped bring millions of rural poor out of poverty. He remains the kingdom’s most popular Prime Minister since the abolition of absolute monarchy in 1932.

There are, of course, plenty of reasons to oppose the billionaire telecom mogul: the catalog of nest-feathering business deals from his time in office left few in any doubt of his lack of scruples, while his 2003 “war on drugs” involved some 2,800 extrajudicial killings. The image of him directing demonstrations from his lavish Dubai haven, while his Red Shirt supporters risk arrest, violence and occasionally their lives, is hardly a heroic one. But the opposition’s failure to exploit these weaknesses is astonishing.

“We always talk about Thaksin because he’s corrupt, he’s abusive, but he keeps wining the election,” says Thitinan Pongsudhirak, professor of political science at Chulalongkorn University in Bangkok. “We have to start asking about his opponents.”

(MORE: Thailand’s Amnesty Bill Unites Political Foes Against Government)

The Democrat Party last won a majority in 1992. Its power base is the Bangkok bourgeoisie, described as “timid, selfish, uncultured, consumerist and without any decent vision of the future of the country” by Cornell University Professor Benedict Anderson. As such, the party finds no support among the rural poor of the nation’s northeast — which is Red Shirt territory — and flounders at the ballot box. But instead of developing manifestos and platforms that could compete for rural votes, the party alienates the heartland electorate further by petulantly calling upon powerful allies — such as the military or judiciary — to undermine its rival.

The pattern is now established. A Thaksin-backed administration is voted in, then it is discreditably ousted by some elite machination (the 2006 coup d’état, the 2008 dissolving of the Thaksin-backed People Power Party by the Constitutional Court). Protesters take to the streets, bloodshed is inevitable, and then a Thaksin-backed party wins at the polls again.

A series of deeply unpopular domestic-policy decisions has been eating away at the Yingluck administration. But Democrat leader and former Prime Minister Abhisit Vejjajiva, who along with Suthep has been charged with murder for ordering the 2010 crackdown while in office, failed in a no-confidence motion against Yingluck in Parliament on Thursday. The Yellow Shirts’ seizure of government buildings has also backfired. “Yingluck has snatched something resembling victory from the jaws of defeat,” says Benjamin Zawacki, senior legal adviser for Southeast Asia at the International Commission of Jurists, adding that Suthep “has likely overplayed his hand.”

(MORE: Thai Protest Leader Calls for a ‘People’s Revolution’ as Demonstrations Enter Third Day)

Divisions within Pheu Thai have been put to one side in the face of the current tumult, and hordes of Thaksin loyalists are rallying inside Bangkok’s Rajamangala National Stadium, festooned with crimson bunting and images of their hero. Another Red Shirt rally in the capital has been announced for Saturday.

Many hoped Thailand’s color-coded conflict would end after the terrible low point of April and May 2010, when almost 100 people died and 2,000 were injured during a government crackdown on a Red Shirt demonstration in central Bangkok. (The Red Shirts were protesting the removal of a democratically elected government, just as Suthep is now demanding.)

Regrettably, all signs now point toward an escalation instead — and soon. Dec. 5 is the 86th birthday of now ailing King Bhumibol Adulyadej and an important holiday in Thailand. Some believe Suthep will not want to mar this occasion and so will, in Zawacki’s words, “seek escalation now in the hopes of a coup or at least a temporary declaration of martial law” before the holiday. These are thuggish politics. The Democrat Party might cling onto its name, but seeing many of its supporters swap yellow for black shirts seems strangely apt.

MORE: Red and Yellow Shirts March in Bangkok

477 comments
musashi
musashi

@Niphon 

You mixed a little bit of facts with plenty of your own personal opinions. The Thai monarchy is heavily involved in Thai politics, coups and violence. Your other points have been addressed by my other posts, which I shall not repeat.


Let me share deeper insights on the monarchy for your reading pleasure:


1. Wikileaks' Classified cable from US Ambassador Eric G. John (http://wikileaks.org/cable/2008/11/08BANGKOK3317.html)


REFER TO ¶10. ATTEMPTS TO KILL THAKSIN

"..certain enemies of Thaksin (NFI) had sought to kill him.  Chutinant said he had been surprised to learn that the contract on Thaksin's life entailed a relatively low payment of only several hundred thousand Baht (in the range of 10,000 USD), although it also entailed resettlement abroad for the person(s) directly involved."

REFER TO ¶7: POLITICIZATION OF THE MONARCHY

"We also met on November 5 with Chutinant Bhirombhakdee (strictly protect), the well-connected scion of a wealthy family with close palace ties.  Chutinant had a leading role in the Constitution Drafting Assembly established by the leaders of the 2006 coup; his wife, Piyapas, has the royal title of "Mom Luang" and works closely with the Queen."

2.http://www.asiasentinel.com/politics/wikileaks-depicts-a-weak-thai-king/

An advisor to Queen Sirikit told US Ambassador Eric John, according to a Nov. 4, 2008 State Department cable made available on the WikiLeaks Web site.

"The monarchy was directly involved in Thai politics and continues to do so. As much as the king has intervened in politics himself, some of his close aides often claim to act on his behalf even when the King knows nothing about it.

"But you must look at the monarchy as a network that also comprises the Privy Council, the military, and not just an individual."


3. Reuters

Thailand's Queen Sirikit and Princess Chulabhorn attended the cremation ceremony of anti-government protestor Angkana Radappanyawuthi. 

"Her Majesty said my daughter was a good woman since she had helped the nation and preserved the monarchy," Jinda told reporters.

(http://www.reuters.com/article/2008/10/13/us-thailand-protest-idUSTRE49C56K20081013)

4. Australia Broadcasting Corporation

"Thailand's Queen Sirikit has attended the funeral of a protester killed in clashes with police last week, giving explicit royal backing to a five-month street campaign to oust the elected government."

(http://www.abc.net.au/news/2008-10-14/thai-queen-attends-protesters-funeral/540772)


Niphon
Niphon

Some fact checks seem in order.


1. Technically, Thaksin's conviction was not for corruption, but for violation of rules against conflict of interest by political office holders. Although he was sentenced in absentia, Thaksin was present in court for much of the trial.Sensing an adverse verdict, he jumped bail and fled the country in August before the verdict was announced in October. His wife's conviction for her role in this was overturned on appeal.

2. The yellow shirts demonstrated in 2005-2006 against Thaksin, not in support of the Democrat Party. One of the two Yellow Shirt leaders, former Bangkok Governor Chamlong Srimuang was a political opponent of the Democrat Party, the other, Sondhi Limthongkul was a former close ally of Thaksin and had no connection to the Democrat Party. The current protests seem much broader than the Yellow Shirt protests. No particular shirt color is dominant. They wear red, white and blue wristlets and lanyards.

3. The proposed people's council does not seem to be any more royalist than the Yingluck government, which is officially appointed by the king and often declares its loyalty to him. So why call it royalist? The king, in his latest birthday address, offered no support to the idea of a council. Although still somewhat vague and evolving, the proposal is to set up a council of at least 400 people to consider political reforms (not replace the government) aimed at reducing corruption and its impact on elections. Three hundred members would be elected by employment groupings in a way still unspecified and 100 would be academic and legal experts appointed by the committee leading the protests. While not particularly democratic, this doesn't seem "royalist."

4. Thailand has a parliamentary system, so the leadership of the government is not determined simply by the popular vote, but by a vote in parliament. The Democrat Party has never won a majority of the vote or a majority of the seats in Parliament. It would be more accurate to say that the Democrat Party was the largest party in Parliament in 1992. It would also be accurate to say that coalitions led by the Democrat Party won power in parliament more recently than 1992; they won the votes for prime minister in 1997 and 2009. In 2009 the Democrat victory was due to a large faction of Thaksin's party shifting allegiance to the Democrat coalition. This was probably facilitated by the court judgement against Thaksin's party, but the party could have stayed in government if it could have maintained the allegiance of that faction. 

5. I am not sure how Mr. Campbell is counting, but it is inaccurate to say that Thaksin-backed parties have won majorities in the last five elections. In 2001, the Thai Rak Thai party did not win a majority of the seats in Parliament (it got 40% of the popular vote and 248 of the 500 seats in parliament) and formed the government only after joining with smaller parties (later absorbing all of them). It did win a majority of the votes and seats in 2005 and in 2006, but three parties boycotted the 2006 election and the election was declared invalid due to irregularities and insufficient votes in some constituencies. In 2007 the pro-Thaksin People's Power Party won 36% of the votes and 233 of the 480 seats. In 2011, the Pheua Thai party won about  12 million of the 27 million valid votes cast (about 44%), but did win a majority of the seats -- 265 out of 500. So, it would be more accurate to say that Thaksin's party won a majority of the votes in only one of the past four valid elections and a majority of the seats in parliament in three out of four of those elections.

5. To say the Democrat party has not tried to come up with a platform with greater appeal to the rural poor is inaccurate. In recent elections, the Democrat platform included a completely free medical plan, price supports for rural commodities, micro-credit development funds, a 25% increase in the minimum wage and extending the years of free education through high school. These policies, however, seemed to most voters in the north and northeast as little more than copies of Thaksin's policies and most maintained loyalty to Thaksin.

6.  Actually, a fuller version of the Anderson quote is:  “I should say that in this way the Bangkok bourgeoisie isn’t far from that of Manila, Kuala Lumpur, Singapore and Jakarta: timid, selfish, uncultured, consumerist, and  without any decent vision of the future of the country.” So, while Bangkokians come off a bit better than the bourgeois classes of four other Asian capitals, Anderson's sweepingly condemns millions of people in five countries in what seems more like an off-the-cuff personal opinion rather than the result of any scholarly study. It seems a bit unfair to juxtapose this comment with the note on the Democrat Party's strength in the capital. The intention seems to be to imply that therefore the Democrats are timid, selfish, uncultured, consumerist and without any decent vision of the future. If the author believes that is the case, he should just say so.

7. While the Democrat Party does have the allegiance of many in Bangkok, the Bangkok vote in the last several elections has been fairly close. It would be more accurate to say the Democrat Party power base is in the south.

8. It is not accurate to say that Thaksin's party was ousted by the court's dissolution of the People's Power Party in 2008. After the dissolution, the PPP members of parliament quickly joined a new party and could have maintained their hold on power if they had remained united. However, a large faction of the PPP split away to join forces with the Democrat Party and other parties to vote a Democrat-led coalition into power. That split may have been facilitated by the party dissolution or by alleged encouragement from the army commander, but the members of parliament had the right to vote for whomever they wanted as prime minister and in 2008 they voted for Abhisit. Whether or not factional maneuvering is "democratic" or not can be debated, but it is not unheard of in the parliamentary democracies of Europe. And, of course, it  can also be argued that court dissolution of whole political parties for the actions of a few senior members violates normal principles of justice.


musashi
musashi

@Wi-JasmineWi

This forum blocks posts that contain vulgarities. Your lack of class probably caused your posts to be rejected.

Wi-JasmineWi
Wi-JasmineWi

@เจย์เจมส์@musashi@charliecampb6ell   BE  A  MAN NOT  MORON WIMP. YOU RESTRICT THE  WEBSTE ONLY  SUPPORTER OF  YINGLUCK OR  SUPPORTER OF  THAKSIN to  post  the  opinions. ANYBODY dispute you block.. SERIOUSLY???? My  opinion  has  sent multiple time but  it show few. TIME  violates THE  LAW.

musashi
musashi

6th Dec 2013: There is a call by the Lawyers' Association of Thailand to dissolve the Democrat Party. Will their buddies from the Constitution Court save them, and dissolve their opponents instead? History said YES.

###
http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/local/383549/lawyers-ask-court-to-end-protests-dissolve-democrat-party

"The current political crisis in Thailand is caused by Mr Suthep, Mr Abhisit and the Democrat Party, after their demonstrators occupied different offices for about a month.

"We can see that their actions are in violation of the rights and liberties of other people. "We ask the court to issue an emergency protective order against the defendants so they will end their protests of surrounding, intruding and occupying private and state offices and disrupting public facilities and transportation," Mr Narinpong said.

The Lawyers' Association of Thailand also asked the charter court to issue an order to dissolve the Democrat Party and impose a five-year electoral rights ban on Democrat executives, he said.
###
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abhisit_Vejjajiva

An 11-member fact-finding panel headed by Deputy Attorney-General Chaikasem Nitisiri voted unanimously in June 2006 to recommend dissolving the Democrat Party, as well as Thai Rak Thai and three other parties, based on evidence that the Democrats bribed other opposition parties into boycotting the elections.(http://www.nationmultimedia.com/2006/06/27/headlines/headlines_30007427.php)

Ultimately, the Constitutional Court of Thailand acquitted Abhisit and the Democrats of bribery, and instead banned Thaksin's Thai Rak Thai party for the same charges. (http://content.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1655420,00.html)
####

musashi
musashi

tiren 

There is not a single post from you that remotely attempt to address what the writer of this article presented. Share with us your thoughts backed with facts, why you think the writer is wrong, and allow others to respond to you.

With you just cursing and insulting like a MAN having his period, it reaffirms the perception that under the leadership of Abhisit, chief of NATO (no action talk only), the Democrat Party has turned into a neighborhood old ladies’ gossip club.

Seriously the Democrat Party should be renamed "Very Democratic Party". This will create public awareness that the Democrats do pay attention to minority interests - especially those who inspire, conjure, and participate in coups.

 

tiren
tiren

musashi

Do not assume that i am female from the name i used. So stop exposing your mother from whOring around and from contaminated Orifice from delivering you. Go back to your drama class young boy.

musashi
musashi

@tiren 

Would anyone have a chance to write a hilarious article about the PADocrats (Democrat Party) if they had been capable of winning elections instead of resorting to coups and insurgency? No.

Would you be bitching around and behaving like an attention wh0re if the PADocrats had won an election? No.

The root cause of your misery is the failure of the PADocrats to understand the voter base, and their inability to help the poor to overcome their poverty and suffering with good policies. Without the support of the poor, who form the majority of the voting base, PADocrats have no chance of winning an election.

Then again, I do not expect you to understand or agree.

Sometimes, having a factual discussion with a PADocrat like you is like playing Moonlight Sonata on piano to a goat. Both of you just don't get it. But at least the goat does not show attitude problems like PADocrats.
 

tiren
tiren

To Time editor:

You let Charlie Campbell post this ridiculous headline of Thailand’s democrat party showed that you are trying to satisfy a request for promise ofadvertisement budget. You could get sued for unethical act.I met your sale personnel and I know. Next time, please use a more reliable reporter and please evaluate their content.

tiren
tiren

Musashi

why are you so concern about Thai politics. It seems like you copy details about taxes and others situation you called facts that i doubt you are a farang. If you were a farang, were you the farang journalist that was kicked out of the rally. You really looked cheap you know with your beer belly flying everywhere when you ran from the mop cursing. Reading your analysis, i suggest you go back and take journalism 101, principal of economics and principal of blah blah. Did you ever graduate? if so, I which field ? drama?? If you are not Thai, what is it to you to be so obsessed about us? Go back to you home and have a life. Leave us alone, you are too shallow to understand our politics . You cannot do it because you get paid writing, Right???

musashi
musashi

Most Thais will say "Long live the King!" to wish HM good health.

Some Thais, namely the Democrat Party will say "Long live the King!" to wish themselves perpetual appointment to be the government without winning elections.

เจย์เจมส์
เจย์เจมส์

Musashi is exactly correct. And this article is exactly correct. The Dem Party hasn't won an election since 1992. They want to keep the old system because they use their networks of nepotism and corrupt  judges to control everything. 

musashi
musashi

Thailand’s Democrat Party Is Hilariously Misnamed

Charlie hit the nail on the Democrat's head when he wrote these headlines.

How on earth can the Democrat Party's name contain any word related to democracy when they are calling for royally appointed PMs in 2006 (by Abhisit) and 2013 (by Suthep)?

###

See: http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/local/383033/suthep-details-council-goals

2013: "Mr Suthep wants to invoke Section 7 of the constitution, which would lead to the installation of a royally appointed prime minister."

2006: "Invocation of Section 7 had earlier been widely lambasted by critics and academics when Democrat leader Abhisit Vejjajiva proposed invoking the section to install a royally appointed premier ... in 2006" 

###

See: http://www.nationmultimedia.com/politics/Range-of-options-exist-within-charter-to-end-polit-30221328.html

And their royalists friends from NIDA and Thammasat University proposed the same too. One wonders why NIDA and Thammasat, despite their huge academic reputation in Thailand, are nobodies in world university ranking. Look no more than the fact that they are promoting a future based on feudalistic practices from the Ice Age.

"Pichai Rattanadilok Na Phuket of the National Institute of Development Administration (Nida) has suggested that His Majesty the King invoke Article 7 of the Constitution to select an interim government to replace Yingluck's Cabinet to reform the country."

"Surapon Nitikraipot, a former rector of Thammasat University, has offered a similar road map to Pichai's but suggested that the Senate Speaker nominate a person to be the prime minister for His Majesty's endorsement. "


musashi
musashi

@JustOneThai

The dysfunctional political system in Thailand cannot be classified as dictatorship.

The term "semi-authoritarian" is more appropriate since it reflects regimes that combine democratic and authoritarian elements:

1)  The authoritarian element is less obvious due to draconian Lese Majeste laws which veiled the public from the shadowy dealings of the monarchy. There is a constitutional system where all the people have to obey one set of laws, while the king and his privy councilors are often lawless. They dictate the judiciary, and run the army and if things do not go their way, history shows they have no hesitation to change the constitution no less than 18 times via 20+ coups (not counting judicial coups).

2)  The democratic element is easier to understand.

Under Thaksin, Thailand's democratic system can best be classified as dominant-party systems. That means, opposition parties are allowed and free elections are held, but where the opposition has no real chance of winning.

The Democrat Party has failed miserably to be a viable opposition party even though they have copied populist policies from Thaksin, simply because their "pork" barrel schemes means even bigger handouts to the army and the elites - eg. their B1.75 trillion debt which was quickly spent on boondoggles. They did not have serious policies that can lift the lowest strata of society out of poverty.

Having said that, both the opposition and Thaksin's parties (in fact all political parties in Thailand) engage in election fraud. Even though sometimes the elections themselves are fair, but the electoral campaigns preceding them are not. That being the case, election fraud is not the distinguishing feature between the political parties.

It is the abject failure of the Democrat Party to be a viable opposition that is the key problem. It does not help that they walk out of parliament frequently resulting in embarrassing voting results, or strangle the parliament police, or throw chairs, or shout abuses in parliament. They are simply missing the chance to help the poor - who are the majority of voters in Thailand.

JustOneThai
JustOneThai

Thailand is an example of how democracy can be abused and become dictatorship by the majority. What democratic government in their right mind would pass a law to absolve corruption?

BTW many people were wearing black in respect to the Supreme Patriarch's passing.

ChinaLee
ChinaLee

Thailand is a democratic mess.

When you lose at the polls, you wait until the next election for your chance to run the government.

You do not go out into the streets and keep trying to overthrow a freely-elected democratic government.

These violent anti-government protests are an attempt at a coup and they are undemocratic. They must stop.

dennbo49
dennbo49

"Tim[d, selfish, uncultured, consumerist and without and decent vision of the future of the country."  And you say they are misnamed as Democrats how?  With the exception of timid, which the Republicans own, they are duplicates of the Party.  The 2006 coup, following unsuccessful assassination attempts was staged a few days before an election.  This is the democracy they are talking about.  Again.  With the exception of the title, your reporting and analysis are correct.  These thugs call for a people's revolution, but who will dig the graves?

musashi
musashi

Suthep and his southern Dem MPs are all in Bangkok helping him to become the next PM via the backdoor. They do not have time for the poor drowning folks back home affected by the flooding.

Royalists are taking the stance that "if we can't win votes, we should destroy everything". Suthep therefore is an ideal candidate. Being a southern mafia godfather with a long string of corruption charges, and whose Democrat Party ran the south to the ground, is hoping to shape Bangkok like the south - with people killed by bombs, guns on a daily basis. Where jihadists take refuge and cause mayhem, and obtain funding through extortion and drugs, working in close collusion with the rogue army and police and Democrat officials.

This is what the royalists hope to turn Thailand into.


musashi
musashi

Mindless morons who think Suthep is organizing a peaceful rally should seriously see the videos and pics of them breaking into government buildings, holding rock catapults, guns, iron bars and throwing ping pong bombs:

http://englishnews.thaipbs.or.th/ping-pong-bombs-thrown-police-makkawan/

"Two home-made ping pong bombs were thrown into barricades manned by police near Makkawan Bridge, causing damage to a police vehicle.

Police said the bombs were hurled into the police behind the barricades at about 7.00 p.m. last night, shattering the windshield of a police van. However no police was injured.

Police said they checked the surveillance cameras near the scene of the bridge and discovered that four youths were near the bridge and then they hurled the bombs and then ran into the crowd of anti-government protesters rallying near the bridge.

Earlier on Tuesday, a ping pong bomb was also thrown near the same place but nobody was scathed."

jeremyipearl
jeremyipearl

Thailand's current political system is a joke and so are its spineless and self-interested politicians of whatever colour. The country is supposed to be a constitutional monarchy but what has been going on there has nothing to do with a functioning democratic system. The elite has had an easy hand in keeping the majority of the population uneducated and malleable througout history. It is a sham best likened to feudalism and should have no more place in a country which is economically as far advanced as Thailand. I am no fan of Thaksin whom I consider another wolf in sheepskin (as you have so many in Thailand's political landscape) and he is certainly not a democrat (but - unlike the army's henchmen, the Democrats - he also does not pretend to be). Whether intentional or not, he was however the one who woke up the masses who had been - and continue to be - exploited by the elite. These masses represent a majority and they have voted for who they think best represents their interests and if the elite does not like the people the majority elected or thinks that the majority gets it wrong, they should aim to educate them and show them that they have common objectives rather than to cause trouble in the hope that the army will stage a coup and bring about a change of government.

KingObama
KingObama

Did you know that Thaksin "supports" the monarchy?  Check Wikileaks and you will find that Thaksin partially supports the Prince's gambling habit.  When the Prince becomes King, Thaksin will be back.  Thaksin is also closely associated with the Dictator of Cambodia or should I say "Prime Minister for 33 years".  What's the big deal? All Thaksin wants is to be a "democratically elected" figure like Hun Sen or Ferdinand Marcos, (although Ferdinand only had 20 years to embezzle)

musashi
musashi

02 Dec 2013: http://www.bangkokpost.com/news/local/382598/media-organisations-condemn-protesters-threats

Excerpts:

"The Thai Journalists Association, the Broadcast Journalists Association and the News Broadcasting Council of Thailand issued a statement accusing the People's Democratic Reform Committee (PDRC) lead by  former Democrat MP Suthep Thaugsuban of ordering television stations to broadcast only its reports and not air any reports from the government

The organisations stated that that was tantamount to threatening the freedom of the mass media and contradicting democracy. They demanded the PDRC call off its intimidating tactics."

Wi-JasmineWi
Wi-JasmineWi

@musashiLack  of  class????? Time  is  going Down  let 's  this  guy keeps  post. Definitely someone  works  inside  TIME.      Class  or  not  class  tell  how  multiple time you  (musashi) post to  Thai  King

chrisjuri
chrisjuri

@musashi The current political crisis is not from Mr. Suthep and Mr Abhisit. I read the article; I can tall you know nothing or someone just pay you to mass up the story. That is OK. because I am going to tell people don't read Time anymore.

goodtime
goodtime

@musashi Well said!    I am Thai educated oversea and are concerned about possibility of Thailand going back to non-elected system  which is not democratic and  damaging to the future of the people of Thailand.  The DEM has failed to equip with new strategies to capture majority of voters in rural areas for decades.  Though I don't like all the things Thaksin did but his strategies are very effective  (not totally brand new as far as distributing prosperity to rural areas is concerned).   


To avert more serious damages, we will need new (young) blood and people in get more involved in sustainable and constitutional fashion going forwards.   Corruption, equal education, social security, employment,  and poverty are on top of the agenda. 

musashi
musashi

@tiren  

Really? Do you have evidence that Time published this article because of a "promised advertisement"?

Or did you pull that nonsense out from your orifice?

tiren
tiren

Musashit:

You must be an offspring of a sick politician or paid by a PR company.  I do not discuss what you call intellectual facts because I do not think you know what it is.  You are just blinded by........  From what i read, it would  take too long to  talk to such an immature person whose brain is showered with poison.

InfernoMax
InfernoMax

@musashi May I make a useless comment and say that I'm surprise you're still posting comments on this article while others seem to have already gotten sick of, I'll be blunt, either the topic of politics or you. No offence intended there.

musashi
musashi

@JustOneThai 

I have to agree with you that the amnesty is ridiculous. Not because it absolves corruption, but that it absolves Abhisit and Suthep from mass murdering 92 innocent civilians, and maiming 2,000 others with war weapons.

goodtime
goodtime

@ChinaLee Cannot agree more.  However people also have the rights to peaceful protest if they don't like anything (corruption, new law etc.).    But yes let your votes heard on the next election.   Yinkluck days are almost over, let's have a new election and let your votes be heard.  The Dem also needs to reach out to the rural voters sooner than later.  If you lost at the poll, you go back to the drawing board and come back stronger - not trying to overthrow a government in the street. It is more sustainable that way.  We still need to follow the constitution regardless (as it is always perfect but the best system so far)  and not going back to non-elected system b/c that will be bad and backwards. Surely some laws can be amended or added as long as people agree and not causing division.   The wealthy and middle class have to also help  and share resources with poor people as we are in the same boat as any major (social) problems will affect all of us.  

tiren
tiren

Do you know what democatic means??  It should not be from the leader who said to his distinquished cabinet that " do not think, i will do the thinking, just do as i said"  You have never heard of it right?? You were not borned or just plain ignorant.

goodtime
goodtime

@musashi  -   It will be a slap in the face to all of us if Suthep is elected as a next PM.  Surely if allows he will use influence behind the scene. Still don't like the DEM approach of overthrowing from the street instead of doing it at the poll. 


goodtime
goodtime

@jeremyipearl  -  Good post...very accurate representation.   The rich always get selfish and want more and more  instead of sharing more to benefits others that are not as fortunate as them...at least philanthropy in Thailand is really small or non-existed in larger scale by the very wealthy individuals.   the long overdue problem is resources are not being distributed equally in terms of quality education, infrastructure,safety, funding, justice system etc.  to rural voters. 

InfernoMax
InfernoMax

@Wi-JasmineWi @musashi 君はなぜフランス語に書いたか?

I can insult people in Japanese if I want to, you don't see me do that, do you? If you want to insult a person, don't write it in a language language they don't understand, say it straight to their face like a man. Also, what does insulting a person achieve? He probably brush it off like it's nothing anyway. If you want to prove him wrong, don't insult him in a language he doesn't understand, do it rationally.


p.s. "Why did you wrote it in French?" is what I wrote

FriendofThailand
FriendofThailand

@Wi-JasmineWi

Don't waste your time commenting on anything that musahsi says.  It's already been established that he is actually Andrew MacGregor Marshall.  You can tell from his pedantic writing style and his obsession with the King.  Marshall made some of the first posts here and suddenly disappeared. After that, musahsi suddenly started to post his "facts".  He can have his opinions, everyone here can see that he just acts like a little boy throwing tantrums and childish insults.  Andrew Marshal is just angry because no one takes him seriously as a journalist anymore. 

Wi-JasmineWi
Wi-JasmineWi

I  have  all  track  record  more over  you called  other  people  Attention  W*ore who  used  vulgar word???
 Dec 1 you  called me attention w*ore  that 's   why I  recommend  you  to  call  your family member.  
Be a Man

musashi
musashi

@InfernoMax @musashi  

Why are you back posting if this article is no longer of any interest to you? No offence intended as well.

tiren
tiren

Musashi.  Abhisit do not want amnesty.  Taksin does.  Get the fact straight young boy.

musashi
musashi

@tiren  

Can you please try to write in proper English? If not, go post in Pantip. They will understand you better.

Wi-JasmineWi
Wi-JasmineWi

@musashi recommend to see psychiatrist. I never see anybody sick like as you following @freindofthailand   reveal  your identity( Andrew   Macgregor  ) . Shame on you.

Even in US following Constitution Bill of Right and Amendment, right of press but not right to Accused other and make other bad reputation.

Wi-JasmineWi
Wi-JasmineWi

@musashi @Wi-JasmineWi 

wow how you put the word on other people 's mouth?????

@musashi you are sick person better need see psychiatrist .


Wi-JasmineWi
Wi-JasmineWi

@InfernoMax @FriendofThailand I came to share opinion and get some ideas what is going on but it s kind of surprise with @musashi user name defend and kind only self-center all over others opinions. so I think it s funny to make him in hot seat.

FriendofThailand
FriendofThailand

@InfernoMax @Wi-JasmineWi @musashi  

Actually what she said was more of an observation than an insult.  Yours was a question, not an insult. Jasmine is probably Thai and Vietnamese and speaks Thai, French, English and probably Vietnamese, very impressive.  I don't see any problem with using other languages if it helps to express oneself.  I understood her, (and you), and the taxi driver.  Even musashi could use Google translate, (except it doesn't work well with Thai and doesn't work at all if the text is transliterated).  musashi would get the point.

MudMookda
MudMookda

@FriendofThailand thanks kindly. that was who i thought it may have been--the scottish clone  of somsuck jiemteerasakul. 


musashi
musashi

@FriendofThailand  

Every frank assessment of the royalty must be from Andrew. Every problem in Thailand is caused by Thaksin - including your wife's infidelity. What a simple world you have.

musashi
musashi

@tiren  

Abhisit needs amnesty much more than Thaksin. Abhisit is feeling a "loss of face" because Thaksin wanted to rescue him from the executioner.

Wi-JasmineWi
Wi-JasmineWi

@musashiDiscrimination ??????  Oh  now  you  want  everybody use  proper english  no  more  colonist. So  why not  dedicate some  $$ to  Thailand  to  educate the  civilize lifestyle.  

musashi
musashi

@Wi-JasmineWi @musashi  

Thank you for your concern. Do you actually have anything useful to contribute in this political discussion? Or just bitching and name-calling as usual? I do not mind responding to an attention wh0re like you, but please at least contribute useful opinions backed with facts.