Stuffed IKEA Toy Becomes Offensive Anti-Government Symbol in Hong Kong

Local stores have sold out of the Lufsig stuffed wolf

  • Share
  • Read Later
Brent Lewin / Bloomberg / Getty Images

Leung Chun-ying, Hong Kong's chief executive, speaks during a question and answer session in the chamber of the Legislative Council in Hong Kong, China, on Oct. 17, 2013

A stuffed wolf sold by IKEA under the name “Lufsig” has become the latest, unlikely symbol of government dissatisfaction in Hong Kong.

After a protester threw the toy at Hong Kong’s chief executive Leung Chun-ying on Sunday, it has become a social media sensation, and the city’s three IKEA stores have quickly sold out their supplies, Huffington Post reports.

Lufsig’s dedicated Facebook page now has more than 30,000 likes, and even mainstream media have caught up on the hype.

Leung is widely referred to as “The Wolf,” but the toy’s Cantonese name, Lo Mo Sai, is also a homonym for an extremely offensive Cantonese expletive.

In Swedish, Lufsig is a cute adjective form of the verb ‘lumber,’ which seems to fit the sturdy wolf in plaid shirt and suspenders well.

[Huffington Post]

5 comments
alphachung
alphachung

In case anyone is curious, the homonym of "Lufsig" in Cantonese means "Your mom's t**t". The homonym of "Throwing" in Cantonese, means the f word. So people throw Lufsig to CY Leung basically means "F*** your mom's t***". 

KenLi
KenLi

what a shame!


Kael'thasKamiya
Kael'thasKamiya

Compared to using the V mask, this symbol is quite childish. It is the democratic left and democratic pacifists' attempt at being rebellious, we of the radical democrats finds it completely childish. Give me the V mask any day.

TimothyChoi
TimothyChoi

Clarification: The toy's Hong Kong name is just Lufsig. The word "Lo Mo Sai" comes from China IKEA's translation of the toy's name.  The (unfortunate) translation was also why League of Social Democrats members used it to throw at CY Leung to express their anger.

jliang1014
jliang1014

@Kael'thasKamiya Politic in HK is much different than in US. If you and your friends worn a V mask walk out to street in US, you and your friends would be able to go home without any problem. The same situation in HK, you might be end up in police station.