Elian Gonzalez Criticizes U.S. Embargo of Cuba

Cuban boy whose custody case drew headlines around the world

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Elian Gonzalez, who was at the center of an international custody battle when he was just six years old, slammed the United States’ embargo of Cuba in his first trip outside Cuba since his case captivated both countries more than a decade ago.

“Just like [my mother], many others have died attempting to go to the United States,” Gonzalez, who was found floating in an inner tube after his mother and nine others drowned trying to reach Florida in 1999, told CNN while in Ecuador to speak at a youth rally. “But it’s the U.S. government’s fault. Their unjust embargo provokes an internal and critical economic situation in Cuba. But, despite that, Cuba, even with all its problems has progressed over the years. The progress we’ve made is all thanks to Cuba’s courage, our dignity, our continued fight for a more just model.”

Gonzalez, now 20, was sent back to Cuba to live with his father in 2000 after a high-profile legal battle waged by relatives in Miami who wanted him to remain in the States

[CNN]

5 comments
drudown
drudown

Particularly given the fact that Russia will prove to be one the United States most important Trade and Military partners in the coming decades, while I agree that our President should dispassionately reevaluate the prudence of outdated Cuba diplomacy, let's get something cleared up. 


The United States is a sovereign Nation of laws. Despite being the "second home" of the entire World Community, it doesn't exist for the citizens of the world to freely immigrate here without any regard for the COST and ILLEGALITY thereto. Taken to its illogical conclusion, the United States is somehow "culpable" for the plight or safety of, say, Haitian immigrants that try to sail to the United States in flagrant violation of our immigration laws? That is as absurd as the notion the proposed immigration "reform" is not void ab initio on account of our Nation's Equal Protection Clause.


Why use the term "reform" when the term "Amnesty and Naturalization" would be the most intellectually honest, correct? 


Aye, I find it rather disconcerting that NOT ONE MEMBER OF CONGRESS has yet to question the Constitutionality of (1) granting 11,000,000-20,000,000+ people mass "amnesty" for violating Immigration Law(s) and (2) diluting the Electoral College by giving citizens of other sovereign an unprecedented opportunity to swing elections, i.e., it is IMMATERIAL which direction. This is nothing short of outrageous given less "onerous" means (i.e,, in terms of vote dilution) are obviously available. 


As an aside, how is the "legislation" not void ab initio on account of giving similarly situated people (e.g., people with statutory violations) different treatment (i.e., amnesty) under Federal law? It clearly violates the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment. 


"Man, if you gotta ask, you'll never know." - Louis Armstrong (asked to define Jazz)

chippy1
chippy1

Elian, the American people are not listening, perhaps you should take off your clothes, twerk around and stick your tongue out, then maybe you will get our attention.

gdawg
gdawg

@AlirezaKhosrowpour 

Why. people do not care about him anymore, he is not little boy. he is a Communist .


r u a commie. 


if cuba could have world news instead of cuba news, they know that cuba sucks