Indian Diplomat Leaves U.S. After Indictment in Maid Case

Scandal-hit Devyani Khobragade to be transferred to Ministry of External Affairs in New Delhi

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Mohammed Jaffer / SnapsIndia / Reuters

Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade attends a Rutgers University event at India's Consulate General in New York City on June 19, 2013

The Indian government requested that the U.S. Embassy withdraw one of its officers in New Delhi on Friday, a tit-for-tat move that comes a day after the U.S. requested Indian diplomat Devyani Khobragade leave the country after being indicted on counts of visa fraud and making false statements. A U.S. official confirmed on Friday that the Indian government had made the request.

Relations between the two nations have been fraught since Khobragade, then India’s  deputy counsel in New York City, was arrested on Dec. 12 by U.S. officials for allegedly making false statements to secure a visa for her domestic worker. Whether the last 48 hours of high-stakes diplomacy mark yet another escalation in tensions or a mutual effort to move on remains to be seen.

A Manhattan U.S. district court indictment alleges that Khobragade submitted a false employment contract in line with U.S. labor laws with her employee’s visa application, but that a second, private contract was later drawn up under which the employee was paid $573 per month — less than minimum wage — and which did not include certain legal protections for the employee. The indictment also alleges that Khobragade asked her employee to work “often up to 100 or more hours per week, often without a single full day off.” Khobragade denies all charges against her.

(MORE: Devyani Khobragade Scandal: Why India Still Won’t Back Down)

India, which claims Khobragade had diplomatic immunity at the time as an adviser to its United Nations mission, quickly transferred Khobragade to a full-time role at the UN after her arrest. On Jan. 8, U.S. officials approved the visa that grants Khobragade full diplomatic immunity, but requested that the Indian government waive it. New Delhi refused. U.S. officials reportedly requested that she leave the U.S., which she has done, but have said that she may face arrest and prosecution if she returns without immunity. Khobragade has been transferred to the Ministry of External Affairs, according to a Jan. 10 government statement.

The news of Khobragade’s arrest last month enraged many Indians. Protests erupted throughout the country over a high-ranking diplomat’s unceremonious strip search and detention (although she was quickly freed on bail). Demonstrators carried signs beseeching the United States “not to humiliate our sisters” and not to “act ugly with Indians.” To many, the spotlight that the case brought on working conditions of domestic workers in India also felt like a high-handed blow. “We do not accept a foreign government dictating to us,” says Gopalaswami Parthasarathy, a former Indian ambassador. “We pay our domestic help very well by Indian standards.”

Meanwhile, a marked chill has set over U.S.-India ties. The Indian government has been applying pressure on the U.S. in New Delhi, clamping down on activities at the U.S. Embassy and demanding information about its employees and their staff. According to NDTV, earlier this week the Indian government asked the embassy to shut down a sports club and restaurants operating on its premises, among other activities. It was the latest in a raft of measures aimed at bringing the privileges of the American staff “strictly in line with reciprocity, the cornerstone of diplomatic ties,” according the Ministry of External Affairs. The same day, U.S. Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz announced that an upcoming visit to India would be postponed.

VIDEO: Indian Diplomat’s New York City Arrest and Strip Search Sparks Fury at Home

83 comments
SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

Also, people who are commenting, please have your picture and be proud to express your opinion, don't be a coward and hide under annonomity. You can die only once if you are brave, a coward dies everyday. Have the balls to say something, it is an opinion,  express  it, this can help the decision makers understand our view point.


These forums are not to hurt, trash  or insult anyone in particular. In this case of devyani, she should just contact the maid have her drop the charges, pay her retroactive wages as per local norms  and let Sangeeta and her family get asylum in America, As we know from all the Indian Foreign Service Diplomats conversations on  Indian New Channels that Sangeeta and her family will not get a fair trial in India. 



SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

We don't need this many Indian Consulates in America, Have one in Washington DC, Use BLS (independent company) to process all visa's.With online security and cloud computing, have virtual embassies that help specific regions and operate this India. Use technology to save money, bring transparency  and prevent wasteful spending by having more than one embassy in a country. Video conference Visa interviews. This is better use of money.  Change the Vienna convention rules that are 50 + years old, We are in a computer and facetime era, no special treatment should be given to any body, diplomat or not, the Diplomat is also a "government servant", follow local laws of the country. 


If you are an Indian Consular personal  or diplomat in Saudi Arabia, I am not sure, if a diplomat's wife can go shopping without a scarf on her head, I am sure she will be warned, or arrested for not following the local law. learn to keep your culture's integrity but abide by local laws, this must be made true for all diplomats worldwide, they are not special people, they are also working for a salary, so be ethical and have moral values.

Voltaire
Voltaire

Indian government could let the justice take its own course, put up an arrest warrant against Preet Bharara in participating in the conspiracy to high jack Richards' family. The send a formal request to our government to extradite him. If the request is declined keep it active, and Bharara comes to visit India arrest him. I am not saying that that is wise course of action but would be perfectly in line with every one should obey the laws of host country.

bonkim2003
bonkim2003

The photo appears to be that of a rent - a - Mob - ignore it.

SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

Go after Devyani's Husband, he being the head of the household that exploited and employed a maid with falsified Visa Documents. Pay up if you want a domestic help to take care of your kids. Set an example by bringing justice to the maid.


Indians and the Indian Government, stop taking the fall and being stupid for a felony committed by your employee in the consular office. Apologize and compromise to Sangeeta Richards for ill treating her and violating her Human Rights, violating the labor laws of the local area.


Devyani and her Husband (who is an American citizen) willfully tricked the Visa office and they should be held responsible for helping Sangeeta falsify information on her visa application. I am not sure if Sangeeta is competent enough to understand the implications, she was happy to come to America and could have had the intent like every other Indian to become a permanent resident to escape the caste-system, political exploitation and beauracy in India.


I feel Sangeeta is the Victim and Devyani;s Husband should be the accused along with his wife who was an accomplice in this case.

Devyani’s Husband being born in America and working at a prestigious university in Philadelphia as an educator, has violated and committed a felon by falsifying Visa application information in bringing a maid to work in their household. He has used his wife’s consular connection to write books and promote the Indian Wine Industry in America, this shows they were aware of their busy life making money while they were exploiting and underpaying their house maid who was a daycare- for the 2 daughters, cook for the family and house cleaner.They must have worked her more than 40 hrs/week and that entitles Sangeeta overtime double pay, which may have not been paid. 


Under payment and work exploitation and holding an individual's passport as a way to prevent their escape, is a serious violation of  labor laws in America and an ethical violation in any country be it India or Somalia,The labor department and the New York City Police should be fair and treat Sangeeta, Devyani and Devyani’s husband as individuals and fine and punish them for their part in breaking local laws.

The Indian Government and Foreign Services, better stay out of this mess, since this is a personal violation committed by an individual employed by the Government of India. Recall the employee and compromise with the victim, who in this case, is Sangeeta Richards, request her to drop the charges and fire Devyani and send a message to other beuracrats that no one is above Human Law and ethics.


The Indian Government needs to review other consular officials worldwide in other Indian Embassies for violation of basic human labor laws and individual countries local labor laws. Train their consular staff to take care of their requirements themselves like every Indian who works abroad does. If you are lazy, pay to get help like every other person.


Devyani’s Husband and Devyani should be punished for the violation of laws in America and the Amensty Internationational should review this case of domestic exploitation of a house maid.

Indians and India call this a grey event in Indo-American diplomacy, If we Indians continue this case further, we are the one’s to loose. The call centers, biotech, software, financial, medical and clerical work from America that has boosted our economy will find other friendly countries like Srilanka, UAE, Lebanon, Singapore, Malaysia, Australia, Phillipines, Indonesia and Bangaladesh. The countries are waiting for India to slip, so that they can enjoy this good money that can boost their economy. If we think we don't need the dollar, you are mistaken. 


The ripple effect of these jobs moving out will be a crash of the stock market in India, the housing market in the major call center and American hub cities in India will collapse, the income tax base will be wiped out, TV channels and News media providing fuel to this fire will be smoked by loosing the base from consumer advertising as there will be no consumers and hence no ads to keep you news media alive.

Be silent and hope this issue is forgotten and we all can continue making some dollars. This is the bottom line, no money, no media, no politics, no commerce.....no spending


The present commerce and foreign exchange income to the Indian Government can vanish in 6 months, so be smart and sensible. In the name of Diplomacy, do not screw your commerce



Lastly

Yeshwant Sinha, (BJP politician)  watch your words and what you say about the GLBT community. I heard in one news channel, you said “Indian Government should retaliate against America on Devyani’s case and have the domestic partners of American Diplomats  arrested as the supreme court in India, declared gay marriages illegal”.  I urge the GLBT community in India and worldwide to take a stand against this kind of statement and hatred towards the community. This kind of a thought by a senior politician should be condemned and corrected. (search on youtube for the video).



Read more: Indian Diplomat Row: Devyani Khobragade Arrest to Be Reviewed | TIME.com http://world.time.com/2013/12/18/us-to-review-devyani-khobragade-arrest-and-strip-search/#ixzz2q6VcjEYV

BingJou
BingJou

"Flees" or "leaves"?  Other news organizations reported that this India diplomat was asked to leave after indictment because of immunity.  Time chose the word "flees" in the title on purpose to humiliate this diplomat.  Making false statement on a visa application is a crime.  In so many states, police can't even question, let alone arrest, someone who sneaks into this country with no visa at all.  I am not so sure that the police would always take such a trouble to arrest and detain someone for false statement.  Do police arrest anyone for making a false statement on a welfare application?  Rarely do.


Indian Government should feel ashamed for being caught in a fraudulent behavior by her own diplomat.  The diploma now escape any consequence in the US Court, but what will Indian Government do to her?

vaishnavjagdip
vaishnavjagdip

What is requested to consider, when any matter becomes sub judice ,in particular when   taken up in foreign /other country

what requires is patience till final judgment comes out. one should not jump upon presumptions & start alleging  .It affects 

cordial relation ship between two countries.



dhurbhat1962
dhurbhat1962

I dont know if its a fraud or a typing 'error' for this article.

On the home page of time, the headline says Indian diplomat "flees".
Headline on this page says Indian diplomat "leaves"

Would this get classified as "fraud" by Krista Mahr.


I agree that if she has paid less than minimum wages, she deserves to be punished.

However because she was a diplomat, she should not have been strip searched.

The uproar is on the mistreatment of an Indian diplomat by the administration, and publishers like Time, who not only indulge in creating drama and show their bias = discrimination. 


I wonder whats the view of the prosecutor and this esteemed journalist on the Raymond Davis case.

Here's a perspective from the Guardian and Wikipedia.

http://www.theguardian.com/world/2011/feb/20/cia-agent-lahore-civilian-deaths

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Raymond_Allen_Davis_incident


Was Raymond Davis an employee of CIA ?

He went to Pakistan as an employee of a private security firm.

He was a contract employee.

How did US argue that he had diplomatic immunity ?

Was that a fraud ?


Whats your view Krista Mahr ?



Meltmark
Meltmark

 Caste is a form of social stratification characterized by endogamy, hereditary transmission of a lifestyle which often includes an occupation, ritual status in a hierarchy and customary social interaction and exclusion based on cultural notions of purity and pollution.[1][2] Its paradigmatic ethnographic example is the division of societies into rigid social groups, with roots dating back to ancient history and persisting until today.- Wikipedia   

You call her treatment barbaric?  The answer to why the Indian community is not supportive of the maid enslaved for $ 143.00 a week is due to the "ancient" practice of Caste systems.  For all of our country's issues, at least we can say it stands for the rights of all individuals.  Shame on India for it's petty retribution.  



Read more: Devyani Khobragade Transfered to New Delhi | TIME.com http://world.time.com/2014/01/10/indian-diplomat-leaves-u-s-after-indictment-in-maid-case/#ixzz2q1uhOW5H

j45ashton
j45ashton

I object to the way this diplomat was searched and how she was treated.  On the other hand, I would not be surprised if the basic allegations were true.  When I think how much a servant would be paid in major cities of India, the mandates here could have easily come as a shock to the diplomat.  Some may find this objectionable, but I have also seen firsthand what class based arrogance can be like.

DhruvPulsari
DhruvPulsari

Hey Krista Mahr, The Indian Diplomat didn't flee. She left on the 'request' of your state department. Correct the article (on Time's frontpage) and don't feed the trolls by sensationalizing it. I have taken a screenshot and will share it on social media if you don't.

BittuMian
BittuMian

India comes out to be a clear winner in this case.

dadadada
dadadada

@SrikanthShivakumar I completely agree with you about downsizing consular presence. These "consuls" are unnecessary staff, and can be substituted with technology once we have passports with biometric data. There is no reason why local US citizens cannot be employed as "honourary consuls", will also earn us local goodwill.


About Saudi Arabia - my personal  view is that Arabs actually treat Indians with far more dignity and respect than an average American is willing to afford us.


The contempt for the "other" runs deep in occidental societies, not oriental.


Going by stereotypes, I'd always try and schedule my flights to the US through Europe. On one occasion when I was not able to, I had to transit through Dubai. The simple fact that security procedures were a breeze and there was no discrimination on account of my colour was liberating. And an eye opener. 


Also about Saudis, they do expect visitors to follow local custom and law, but make an exception for pretty much everything in consulates. 


America is a young country, the delicate nuances of diplomacy and statecraft elude the masses. Simple narratives around guns, bombs, bullets, slaves, class are much easier to comprehend. 


American popular response is perfectly understandable - what's baffling is the behaviour of officialdom. Or, perhaps not. It has emerged that the US Delhi Embassy official who was the kingpin of this operation (since expelled) - was a consummate racist and xenophobe. Google "racist american diplomat wayne".

dadadada
dadadada

@Voltaire Bharara does deserve an arse whalloping, but the real culprit is Wayne May, the expelled official. He was head of security, euphemism for CIA perhaps? And, Richard's in-laws worked for that family. Google him - he and his wife had nothing but contempt for India. Some of their facebook posts are truly offensive. 

dadadada
dadadada

@bonkim2003 The entire episode was designed to rent-an-outrage. I just wish we could have ignored it - with a man, perhaps. With a woman - for treatment that amounts to rape in India - nah. Reach for the holster.

dadadada
dadadada

@SrikanthShivakumar  "I feel Sangeeta is the Victim and Devyani;s Husband should be the accused along with his wife who was an accomplice in this case."


And I "feel" that Sangeeta is a CIA mole, should be tried, and shot for high treason (the REQUIRED punishment). Let's compromise - she gets to clean the toilet and bail her drunkard husband with her meagre earning, and Devyani enjoys her celebrity, cultivates grapes in her father's ill-gotten lands. Her husband then sniifs off on the wines, and everybody lives happily thereafter. Deal?


riggedveda
riggedveda

@SrikanthShivakumar  You couldn't be more wrong.


There is a reason the US went after Devyani. She is the person who signed the contract. It doesn't matter what disdain you have for the husband for unrelated reasons, or your gender-biased views of who is the 'head' of the household, the fact is that the employer here is Devyani, not her husband.


The rest of your arguments are weak at best. I'll briefly address them.


Firstly, you claim that Devyani violated local labor laws. There is no proof of this. Even the indictment doesn't charge her with any violation of wage laws (let alone abuse or trafficking), meaning the prosecution believes they do not have sufficient evidence to even establish probable cause for any such charges. I encourage you to read the complaint that led to her arrest, as well as the indictment, which really the chance for the prosecution to bring forth every charge they have a reasonable chance of proving. Yet in both cases the only charges they have raised are visa fraud and false statements on a visa form (both of which relating to the same act).


Secondly, your claims of the effects on the economy from this episode are greatly exaggerated. The US is strongly capitalist. Unless a country is regarded as harboring terrorism, diplomatic tiffs do not affect commerce. Just look at their diplomatic versus trade relationship with China. Also, none of India's actions here were material to the US. Only unilateral benefits were withdrawn, and there was no retaliation towards US diplomats. In fact, I'd go so far as to say the response was weak and great care was exercised so that US state department wouldn't consider any act to be an offensive. And more importantly, India is not overly dependent on US trade. Most of India's GDP is not related to trade at all, and even within such trade, US trade accounts of 5% of imports and 12% of exports, of which the fields you've mentioned don't constitute a major part. The only reason Indian citizens find it attractive is because the salary potential for individual Indians is highest in high-tech industries serving the US. But they make up a minute percentage of the Indian population, and its actually detrimental to its economy at this stage to have most of their top engineers in a single export-oriented field with a single export market. Imagine the advances that could be made in Automotive, Aeronautics, Electronics, Semiconductor, Solar, etc. if they got their fair share of good engineers. All that's needed is for the wage bubble in software to pop, and it will happen pretty soon, regardless of any diplomatic spat.


What you are currently engaged in is scare-mongering. Devyani is not an ordinary Indian citizen in the US. She is a diplomat. You can arrest an ordinary American citizen in India on tax fraud, but do the same to Wayne May, the US diplomat in India who is accused of tax fraud, among other things (by indicating to a travel agent that tickets for the maid's family were diplomatic and tax-exempt), and watch the US reaction unfold. The US state department had already been handed a long list of local law violations by their diplomats. Their reaction was, and I quote: “The U.S. government endeavors to always be in compliance with local laws and regulations. Indian diplomatic notes to the State Department raise highly technical and complicated issues. It’s also clear that there are differences of opinion about the privileges and immunities of our respective diplomatic and consular personnel.” This typical muted response basically boils down to "The Indian government has shown that our diplomats have technically violated local laws, but we thought they had immunity". Diplomats are the representatives of a country in their host country, and it is widely recognized that they should be treated with respect and dignity.


If you remove Devyani's pre-trial arrest from this whole situation, everything else that the US did is acceptable (if not ideal). What would have happened is that the indictment would have proceeded, she would have taken the plea deal that was offered with no jail time, and she would still be in the US. The crux of the issue is the pre-trial arrest. It shouldn't have taken place, and the US has still not formally acknowledged that it was done in error. Absent any other charges, a visa charge and a false statement charge is not 'grave' and do not warrant the pre-trial arrest of a diplomat, let alone her strip search.


Lastly, regarding Yashwant's statements: Yes, they are offensive, but the intent was not to arrest homosexuals, who this case has no relation to. It was to highlight just how important it is to treat cases involving diplomats with a great deal of sensitivity and not blindly with the cane of local laws. The LGBT community is better served petitioning lawmakers to their case and getting anti-gay legislation amended, rather than wasting their time targeting a specific politician.


Note: I am not a supporter of Devyani or her father, particularly the latter who I view as uber-corrupt. But it does not matter. This is a case of 2 countries trying to establish what reciprocal protections their diplomats enjoy in their respective countries. It is not related to any specific charges or what impact you think it will have on trade. The media on both sides showed faults that they are known for. The US media is at fault for making generalizations and bringing up one-sided accusations ranging from 'underpayment' to 'trafficking' to 'slave driver' without such charges even having been brought up by the prosecution against the diplomat. The Indian media is at fault for drumming up 1000's of news stories around this every day where more pressing issues await public attention.

WhoAmI
WhoAmI

@SrikanthShivakumar : you troll , any body with little brain can understand your cheat under false name. Look at the propaganda , India will fall if USA blinks , Why dint america blinked here ? why did they compromised in this case if they knew they are right ? Write something worth as much as you paid ?

svnagappa
svnagappa

@SrikanthShivakumar YOu are amazing. You have made so many allegations one would think you lived and worked for them. What a lot of nonsense you are talking about. First of all Richards is the employee of Devyani not her husband as she is entitled to have maids under the diplomatic privileges so she is the one who is responsible. Next India has very little to lose. Since 2008 GFC it is US economy which is struggling to create jobs not India. India is nearly growing at 6% or does not this matter to you. Not an iota of change will happen in trade or commence. However I do understand your mentality as indicated by your rant. It is very suspicious that the maid would work that many hours in a household of 4 people. He a professor so most of the time spent at university if he has any merit, she a diplomat hence not sitting at home and concocting jobs to do and children at pre school and school. Yes if she has falsified documents that is wrong no about however US has more than a million working as illegal aliens even paying taxes in Calfornia etc. So have they arrested all those employers. No. Another major issue here is Richards not being allowed to go back to India. This is where the major problem is. No one can hold anyone hostage by keeping passports etc. That is not acceptable at all if that has happened. If Indian govt really improved it labour laws then every maid should be paid a living wage and judging by the fact that one needs atleast Rs 10000 to live per month and judging by 8 hour days as per labour laws std then each household should pay atalest Rs 3000 per month for a maid who works in their home. Do you think you will pay that for your maid. In India people die to pay even 1000 per month. 573 x 55=31515 rupees per month. This excludes food and rent. If Richards was not provided these facilities then she was paid low wages. If Richards was living separately she should have been paid $1200 per month as per minimum wages but should would be spending that money on rent itself. So please think before you rant and rave. BTW none of the things you predict will happen. rest easy.

bonkim2003
bonkim2003

@SrikanthShivakumar Spot on Mr Shivakumar - but most better off Indians sit in their holes and wouldn't think much about the underpaid and exploited class.


The US came out of its deep-seated civil rights black-hole in the 1960s - India will probably be there in 2600AD assuming the earth has any people left then.

SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

@BingJou 

Take the example of Martha Stewart, she just made pennies on the dollar for her 'insider trading' when she sold stocks of imclone, She went to prison and was treated like any other felon, for the mistake, for all the money she has and the clout she had, the law wanted to send a message to everyone that 'no one is beyond the law' justice will be served if you commit a crime. In this case Sangeeta  Richards is the only person who can make all this go-away for devyani. not the Indian Government. 

SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

@BingJou 


Sangeeta is innocent, she was exploited by two educated individuals, I don't care if they were Indian or American, they were people who knew very well, they were doing something wrong and holding an individuals passport which is one's personal travel document should be in the individuals personal effects and not with her employer. That itself is a violation of Moral and Ethical Values.

mahadragon
mahadragon

@dhurbhat1962 Khobragade should not have been strip searched period. Many US politicians have been found to underpay their nannies and they don't get arrested. Even if she did lie on the employment form, it might be a felony, I don't know, but that's a civil crime, not a violent one. Can you imagine the conversation in that jail cell?


Khobragade: "So, what you are you in for?"

Inmate: "Armed robbery. And you?"

Khobragade: "I underpaid my nanny. Oh, and I lied about it on the form."

mahadragon
mahadragon

@j45ashton Everyone keeps saying, "Oh, look at the poor nanny" as if she's got 8 kids and lives in a shack in the worst part of town. The nanny was allowed to live and work on the premises. That's compensation, even though it doesn't go on the record books as an hourly wage. Free rent counts for something in my book and I don't even know if that included meals either.

SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

@DhruvPulsari 


"Flee" is the right word. if you think Devyani was wrongly accused of wrong doing, fleeing is the right term.  people flee when they are wrongly being pursued, 

"leave" is when you are kicked out of a place and have no options of staying back. If Devyani is Moral and Ethical, she should have left with her husband and daughters. The husband should be the primary accused as he being a regular US Citizen did not report his wife's conspiracy of underpaying a domestic help. He should leave....


When a person is asked to leave it's an 'order' not a 'request'..

m.joey15
m.joey15

@DhruvPulsari  TIME should be ashamed of this, the lengths these people go to sensationalize things and feed negative sentiments. Kudos to you for writing this note. They fixed the article headline, but the link on the homepage still says 'Flees'. This is how they want people to come to this article, Journalism at its lowest.

SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

@BittuMian India by escalating the incident has made a big mistake personally to Devyani, she married an american citizen and had children in america so that one fine day she could settle down in the US, there is no patriotism here, it is well planned. She used the Indian Foreign Services as a scapegoat to get free housing and amenities, while her husband made the regular american income. This is a typical Indian strategy, I know this because being Indian myself this is the mentality we have grown up in. I am sure Devyani has used her "Dalith" card to get favoritism in India, she just forget in the United States your are not special enough to escape from your mistakes,


Stop this practice of people bringing domestic help, have all diplomats use a regulated domestic service company. I feel if the consulate official cannot cook and clean up after entertaining guests, don't invite guests. Take the person to an Indian restaurant..



I am sure there is ethics violation, when you are entertaining official guests at your home when the business is official. Have cook and domestic staff in the consulate not at your personal home abroad.

STOP THIS PRACTICE. it is Human Trafficking.

mahadragon
mahadragon

@BittuMian  Why? Because they acted like complete brats in retaliation for how Khobragade was treated?

SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

@svnagappa @SrikanthShivakumar 

Nagappa, Namaskara, Please wake up, I am willing to pay $1200, if I can have an Indian maid work for me in my house in Columbus Ohio, I will give her free room and board, feed her the same food, or she can eat and serve us what we need. We are just husband and wife as our daughter is in college, we have given our daughter a private school education in America, paying $ 2400 while public school is free. you pay for services., You pay if you need help or a you want to send you child to private school. I will sign up a 1000 people to start if we can get maids from India to just cook and housekeep for us. My brother pays $20.00 and hour for is son's child care at home by a personal american nanny, you have to spend if you want luxury.


They world has to visit this human trafficking by diplomats under the grab of immunity. They are just doing a job and should not accorded special treatments. Diplomats may start being in their own countries and operate virtual embassies and one one stone and mortar embassy per country when they are not able to pay their employees and domestic help local prevailing wages.



SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

@Voltaire @SrikanthShivakumar 

GAY, LESBIAN, BISEXUAL & TRANSGENDER (GLBT)


Gay will be homosexual  ( men liking men)

Lesbian (women liking women)

Bisexual ( they are both gay and lesbian)

Transgender ( men wanting to express themselves as women ( shemale) or women wanting to express themselves as men (sheboy))

BingJou
BingJou

@SrikanthShivakumar@BingJou


Good point, sir.  Alexis de Tocqueville observed in his book - Democracy in America - how law-abiding Americans were.  I saw the same thing when I came here 1983.  The tradition may have eroded a little bit.  To the largest extent, Americans are much more law-abiding than Chinese.


Chinese society is less than admirable in this regard.  Many of old friends who had only visited for a short period of time simply refuse to, or can't, understand American people is different.  There is something we should learn from them.

WhoAmI
WhoAmI

@SrikanthShivakumar: So you know everything did you lived with them ? And how much your paid for trolling ? I could use extra money?  I mean  your very bad at your job

SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

@mahadragon 


Violent crimes kill people by a fraction of a second, overworking, humiliation, working someone to entertain a guest with Indian Food, and having her passport confiscated, is a more bigger crime, it is a mind game that can seriously kill a person, for a person involved in such a practice is a bigger criminal. Lying on an application has consequences in present day america, it is a Moral and Ethics Violation, The American Husband of Devyani needs to pay for this crime against a weaker house maid Sangeeta Richards

SrikanthShivakumar
SrikanthShivakumar

@mahadragon @j45ashton 

I will pay you $ 500 and food if you will work for me cleaning and entertaining my friends. We have no Little children for you to take care off. Are you up to this and do you think it is fair

Maligma
Maligma

@m.joey15 It may have been initially reported to the writer of the headline that she had, in fact, fled. Often times it's just miscommunication that leads to these errors, rather than intentional sensationalization. But I can understand how it might look from a perspective opposed to her treatment.

dadadada
dadadada

@SrikanthShivakumar @svnagappa What is you reaction to the racist diplomat who set this whole thing up? His wife banters along with her friends on facebook laughing about how well fed her god is compare to her Indian gardener. Do you not see where this whole thing started?


I do see where you are coming from, and I do acknowledge that there are many an Indian willing to exploit domestic help who do not have legal protection.


Consider the consequences if we enforced a minimum wage on domestic help (say 10,000 rupees a month, and 40 hours a week, privileges which an entry level Indian soldier would crave). What happens? People no longer employ domestics, about the only jobs available to unlettered people that does not involve back-breaking physical labour. Result, massive entrenchment, penury, increased sales of washing machines, dish-washers, vacuum cleaners, and a myriad other domestic appliances. 


As a part of my job, I design pant automation equipment. I do not know for sure, but the machines I design probably replace a 100,000 perfectly employable and honest people each year, who either lose their jobs, or fail to seek potential employment. Do I enjoy it? I have actually WEPT over it (admittedly while inebriated - emotions do not come easy to men trained to hide them). 


What do we do to these maids, since their men have already been displaced by automation? How do they feed themselves? It would be easy enough to turn them into welfare dependent individuals and destroy their souls. Let the machines do all the work, we humans will survive on dole financed by tax that the machines have paid.

dadadada
dadadada

@SrikanthShivakumar @svnagappa Earlier human rights was used as a tool to beat us. Now that the US itself is a terror victim, that is a no no. So, resort to human trafficking.


Do you not see the pattern? A whole industry has to survive on povertarianism, and human misery. This lady Sangeeta Richards, seems perfectly capable of fending for herself. Did she realise that there was a violation in law AFTER she reached the US? What is her educational qualification? From the evidence presented, it appears that she was conversant in English. And yet, she is a victim of trafficking, rather than a participant in a scam, or worse, a wannabe immigrant willing to frame another human being and embroil her country in a completely unnecesary fracas with a superpower?


You lefties treat adults like Children. There are people in the world that need our help to navigate this maze of laws and regulations that drive the modern world, they sure need no advise on common sense. And they definitely need no condensation. 


I can tell you this much - the Husband was a professional driver. The license requirement are a minimum 10th grade certificate. Hardly your typical victim of trafficking. 

riggedveda
riggedveda

@SrikanthShivakumar @svnagappa 

Srikanth, are you willing to pay for her medical insurance and out of pocket medical expenses too? If you're not covered under a subsidized employer-provided group policy (which you probably are, but your maid wouldn't be), it can easily run up to $600 per month for insurance and $200 per month in monthly deductible, meaning your offer of $1200 per month is lower than what Devyani was paying.


Let me make this clear to you. Devyani has NOT been charged with any violation of minimum wage laws, which allow deductions for room, board and insurance. She has been charged with visa fraud. A3 visa rules prohibit deductions for room, board and insurance, though US wage laws do not. If Devyani had provided the EXACT same benefits she was giving Sangeetha to a locally hired maid, this case would not exist.

svnagappa
svnagappa

@SrikanthShivakumar @svnagappa No not me please get your facts right. The law says one needs to pay minimum wage not necessarily market wage. The minimum wage in the US is 7.25. I have calculated according to that and added a bit more. Indian minimum wage is not set it is market driven. For eg in Bangalore a maid can be paid about 1000-6000 rupees a month. Devyani was paying less than half the minimum wage per day for a 8 hour day. Guess what where I live if I paid US minimum wage then I would be sent to jail. So please dont confuse minimum wage in one country with the other. Similarly your private schools education is about 7 times cheaper than private school education where I live. So life is not that simple. Your idea that diplomats do human trafficking is absurd and illogical. If she was doing so she would not have drawn up a contract. Just because you live in USA it does not mean to say what ever it does is right and correct. You please read history re all that. I dont have time to explain here. Diplomats do a very valuable service to their nations and much of it is done behind closed doors. How do you think inter country trade negotiations and business happens? by just people sitting in their homes? Because your brother is only paying $20 per hour and that wage is not acceptable where I live  can I call your brother also as a human trafficker ? Please understand how diplomatic system works prior to making absurd comments. I suggest you go to California in your paradise country and see how many Hispanics are working for less than minimum wage and at the same time considered as illegal aliens. US needs to clean up the big elephant that has died in its room before cleaning up the dead rat in others toilets. If they have problem with the Indian system they should address it through proper channels of governance not make fools of themselves this way. I am not condoning what has been done but there is a way of handling things and that is called as diplomacy.

WhoAmI
WhoAmI

@SrikanthShivakumar: the above statement itself enough to prove your paid troll. You are ok  with anything USA does but not others . tell me know how much you get paid for trolling ?

Maligma
Maligma

@m.joey15 I replied to someone else who happened to take me seriously on that one as well. The short answer is that I was kidding around. I suspected someone might pick up on the fact that I was satirizing Americans' opinions regarding immigration. The reason for it was that the commenters before me made me laugh and put me in a joking mood with their... discussion regarding the damage done to US-India relations.


The reason I seem to be 'singing a slightly different tune' is because I'm trying to shed the hostility that seems to have been adopted early on. All I've done is attempted to explain myself so that you might understand that I was neither being argumentative nor pro-American. Just stating another side of things.


But that's all I'm going to say on the matter. Sometimes the devil simply needs an advocate. 

  It was good interacting with you. You're one of the few people here that didn't come off as insane. Thank you.





P.S. I'm Canadian anyways. I'm not really brimming with American pride.


m.joey15
m.joey15

@Maligma you have me amused here, so I will care to respond. I did read your comments to me and some other as well.  You started with using this incident to express your hopes for reduction in immigration, what was that about? Then you changed your tone seeing a fitting response. Now you seem to be singing a slightly different tune here also, one more mellow, hoping you can hide behind a lot of words strung together. Good for you, I say. At least you are flexible, if nothing else. 

Maligma
Maligma

@m.joey15 I'm not defending; I'm offering a different perspective. 


 If I was confident in my assertions that this may not have been intentional, I would have avoided the use of words like 'may' and 'often times'. 


   See, the thing of it is this: when someone is offered one perspective and one perspective only, they will likely be inclined to believe it. It's human nature. The urge to follow and all that jazz. So, by offering another perfectly valid possibility, I am reducing the instinct to blindly follow the first statement made. 


   Personally? I have no opinion of whether the headline was intentional. I have no way of knowing for sure, but I'd like to believe that TIME has a little more integrity than that.


   But anyways. I understand your point about the lack of fairness between this case and others. But no matter how you spin it, it isn't going to be fair. If she had not been questioned by the authorities, I feel the domestic servant would have been the one shafted. And while this might be better for international relations, the USA was over a barrel. Either forfeit the human rights of the diplomat's worker, or challenge the diplomat's immunity. And for a country that seems to pride itself on the fair treatment of people, it would be a hard violation to appropriately explain.


   No matter what, it was a bad situation. One that the diplomat herself got into. This isn't a failure by any country. This is her failure, and her's alone. It's a shame that anyone else should have to be involved.

m.joey15
m.joey15

@Maligma What lengths you would go to to defend US point of view and everyone else who is propagating the same sentiments. Are you sure that this wasn't deliberate? I suppose there is an army of editors employed at publishing houses checking information/proof reading before news gets published just to prevent false information from getting out.  By the way, I am not 'opposed' to her treatment per se. I respect the law of the land, if she is accused of wrongdoing and doesn't have diplomatic immunity, she should be treated as such. The lady in question herself has some doubtful record in some real estate dealings in India. The only problem is it is supposed to go both ways. There are some reported incidences where it hasn't happened for US diplomats, or they have enjoyed special privileges. India also has a history of bringing up issues to US and not getting the appropriate response (read up on Bhopal MIC gas tragedy - Union Carbide), but that's a much broader topic. This is what might be causing all the anger in my opinion. The actual issues are broader than just this one and probably they need to be addressed instead of the knee jerk responses everywhere. And if you choose to go on defending, you are welcome to do that, I am not interested in any further interaction. I have stated my opinion.