Reports of Rohingya Massacre as ASEAN Ministers Meet in Burma

Activists in western Arakan state say at least 10 killed, including women and children

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Soe Zeya Tun / Reuters

Muslim women react to the loss of their homes which were burnt down in recent violence in Pauktaw village, outside of Thandwe in the Rakhine state, October 3, 2013.

Reports have surfaced that ethnic Rohingya were violently targeted during the early hours of Tuesday morning in strife-torn Arakan state in the country’s west.

Activists say at least 10 people, including women and children, were brutally killed after authorities and Rakhine Buddhists attacked and looted a village in retaliation for the apparent murder of a police officer earlier in the week.

Based on eyewitness accounts collected by the Arakan Project, which manages a monitoring network in western Burma, police entered the village in southern Maungdaw Township on Monday night to check family lists of Rohingya living in the area. That triggered a violent skirmish between officials and local youth, in which one police officer may have been killed, the Arakan Project’s Chris Lewa says. Local Rohingya deny the killing.

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The latest outbreak of violence comes as Burma hosts its first round of meetings as the chair of the Association of South-East Asian Nations (ASEAN) this week, with foreign ministers from the region holding talks in Bagan.

However, Burmese officials said they would not be discussing the country’s Rohingya population during talks.

The issue “is our internal affair and we will not discuss it in the ASEAN meetings, even if member countries ask for it,” said Ye Htut, according to Deutsche Presse-Agentur.

The Rohingya are widely discriminated against in Burma and seen as interlopers from Bangladesh despite evidence that suggests they have been in Burma for centuries. The Rohingya were stripped of citizenship by the ruling military junta in 1982 and have been systemically excluded from Burmese society ever since.

In 2012, several bouts of ethno-religious rioting erupted in western Burma’s Arakan state, where the vast majority of the Rohingya reside, following the commencement of a pseudo-civilian government following decades of military rule. The violence resulted hundreds of deaths and more than 100,000 people were displaced, mostly Rohingya.

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9 comments
EnayetMowla
EnayetMowla

A request now. I read the following comments written by people who know virtually nothing about the past history of the Mogs in Arakan. Time Magazine has a good reputation. In my opinion the Magazine authorities should have have some restrictions on the comments it is printing. Reading comments like these will only excite others. 

EnayetMowla
EnayetMowla

At onetime Arakan was comprised of four provinces namely DHANYABADI, MAEGAWABADI, DWARAWADI, & RAMMAWADI including almost half of the area now known as Bangladesh. According the history written by the British Colonial officers, all these provinces were ceded to British India under the terms of the Treaty of YADABO, at the end of the Anglo-Burmese War in 1826, when a large number of Chitagonians migrated in Arakan. These people are now known as ROHINGYAS. Incidentally, an area of Bangladesh's capital city Dhaka is still called MOGH BAZAR.


The King of Burma attacked Arakan in the year of 1812, when there was a genocide. In order to save their lives the people of 

Arakan (known now as Rakhaines, also as MOGS) fled westward crossing Naaf River in Bengal. An Army Officer known as Capt. Hiram Cox received and settled them on the sea side and others in the forests and hills of Chittagong. In honor of his services the name of this place now is COX'S BAZAR in Bangladesh. A couple of their Chiefs, in Manikcharri and Bandarban

are still living here and they confirm that their origin was Burma.


In short, according to the history, Moghs left their descendants behind in Bangladesh when they left hundreds of years ago and those who  were driven out from Arakan and escaped are still living in Bangladesh. 

EnayetMowla
EnayetMowla

I have given my name, e mail address and Password. 

Can I give my comment now? I cannot give anything else.

geens01
geens01

Good for the Burmese.  They are doing their best to protect themeselves and pragmatic civilized world should do everything to help them.

DilipKumar
DilipKumar

There is no Rohingya in Myanmar. So called Rohingyas are Bengali Muslims from neighboring Bangladesh who were brought to Burma by British during colonial rule. After the British left, the Bengali Muslims are refusing to go back home. The Bengali Muslims are also distorting the history of Burma and cooked up Rohingya identity to mislead the civilized world. The Bengali Muslim infiltrators are funded and sponsored by oil rich Middle east and Muslim world. The Bengali Muslims are involved in rape, abduction, murder of indigenous Burmese people. Burma and Burmese people have no option but to drive out Muslim infiltrators by force.

change4ark
change4ark

Show me one historic artifact with "Rohingya" name on it. He said she said is not a history. It's called myth. 

change4ark
change4ark

Dear David Stout, 
You wrote about "evidence that suggests they have been in Burma for centuries". 
You are totally mislead. 
There is no concrete evidence but only he said she said. 
Centuries? You gotta be kidding me. 
Read more about how the British colonial government brought all of them without the consent of the indigenous people. 

EnayetMowla
EnayetMowla

It seems that Dilip Kumar is a well read knowledgeable man and knows facts.

Can I request him now to let me and others here know where he got these facts?


MayuKyaw
MayuKyaw

@change4arkRead more history about Rohingya  written by Foreigner historians.  Arakan was soil of Rohingya,Bama occupied it  in 1764. 1982 changed Arakan to Rakhain.