Snowden: My Life Is In Danger

U.S. officials "would love to put a bullet in my head," he says

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Former NSA contractor Edward Snowden claimed in a recent interview to have received “significant threats” to his life after leaking classified data about the agency’s surveillance network.

The whistleblower, who has been granted asylum in Russia, cited reports of anonymous U.S. officials wishing him harm. “These people, and they are government officials, have said they would love to put a bullet in my head or poison me when I come out of the supermarket and then watch me die in the shower,” Snowden said.

“I’m still alive and don’t lose sleep for what I did because it was the right thing to do,” said Snowden in an interview with German public television broadcaster ARD, which aired on Sunday. “There are significant threats but I sleep very well.”

Snowden also claimed the U.S. spy agency is involved in industrial espionage and European efforts to protect citizens’ data from U.S. surveillance are likely to fail, the Financial Times reports. National cloud servers proposed by European politicians and tech companies as a way of keeping data on European soil were “not going to stop the NSA,” he said.

The NSA is also engaged in economic espionage, said Snowden. He told the broadcasters that if German engineering company Siemens had information that would benefit U.S. interests, but had no relevance to national security, the NSA “will go after that information and they’ll take it.”

[The Financial Times]

50 comments
fromhello2hello
fromhello2hello

Thank you Snowden for doing the right thing and not putting up with insanity.

MartinTimothy
MartinTimothy

Edward Snowden nuthin', his stuff re state eavesdropping has been common knowledge for twenty years!

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2010/dec/01/police-seek-julian-assange-rape-claims

He is a figment of the Jew media machine that wants to divert attention from the ongoing and Jew inspired genocide in Syria, no less than Jew guilt for the attacks of September 11, 2001.

http://911-harley-shirt-guy.blogspot.com.au/2009/05/mark-adrian-humphrey-actor-is-harley.html

Just like Julian Assange a Zionist plant wanted for rape in Sweden, and Bradley Manning who is a figment of the Canada/Greenburg false flag machine, which provided false witness the Harley Shirt Guy on 911.

http://img168.imageshack.us/img168/6641/globetabloid3000ig3.jpg

As for US President Barack Obama, he should be preparing his defense to capital charges for turning from the same evidence, then he can demonstrate his commitment to US law by co operating with Chicago prosecutors, re his alleged role in the 2007 murders of his alleged butt buddies Donald Young and Nate Spencer!

siaripop7
siaripop7

I'm beginning to wonder about his mental health. There's too much chatter and additions to his original statements lately.

rock0267
rock0267

Of course his life is in danger. He's a traitor.

TedBell-BeverlyHills
TedBell-BeverlyHills

Well, you know, the internet *had* it's true roots as a DARPA/Defense project. Problem is, with Osama Bin Laden being found, captured and executed, the Defense budget is no longer needed for "Terrorism".


The more I read about Snowden, and estimate the budget size, it's fascinating that the US also entered into two wars, in foreign lands to find a small team of people responsible for 9-11, under this "terrosim" concept. 

When Bush introduced "Homeland" Security, all I could think about was massive expansion of federal power, which overtakes local and state power.   This runs opposite of the reason why the US founding fathers created states and local governments.


My guess is that with finding Bin Laden, NSA budgets will be cut to pre-911 levels.  They may also need to re-brand themselves into a new agency name soon, now that the threat has been killed..  "Ghostbusters" has a nice ring to it.  What do you think?

Scola
Scola

Does anyone doubt what he is saying?  People may call him a "traitor" but does anyone doubt that his words are 100% true?  The NSA is a secret police force and a domestic spying agency, sort of a modern-day Stasi.  It is time to abolish the secret police.  These organizations are incompatible with liberty and democracy.  

EstanislaoDeloserrata
EstanislaoDeloserrata

We are all waiting for someone to come to Snowden's aid with a message like this " Hey Obama, if anything happens to Ed during your watch,   then your little town is frooking toast."  

 No, wait -- only governments and their loose-cannon poseurs can threaten someone.


Still, it's time that someone took the USG down a notch or two.

poliphobic
poliphobic

What a courageous young man he truly is. I salute him and wish him well - a true hero, unlike the be-medalled buffoons who promote war.

Shoeone
Shoeone

Snowden will be fine unless he starts biting the Russian hand that feeds him.  If he does, he may find himself falling down a flight of stairs, suffering from an unexplained bout of poisoning, or getting shot in an elevator by mysterious assailants.  Those are the traditional ways that the Russian authorities deal with those who have ceased to be useful to them, or worse, exposed their sins.  But Snowden is too smart for that.  He only accuses people he knows will not stoop to putting him on a hit list.  He's a model inmate.

coleysatcher
coleysatcher

Actually, poisoning [usually via radioactive material] is more of a Russian speciality.

Ruleoflaw10
Ruleoflaw10

First of all, he is not a whistleblower. He is a traitor. Second, not surprised that Snowden is again trying to give US secrets that have NOTHING to do with US citizen privacy to foreign governments. He's a villain, and just doing what comes naturally: selling out his country. Again and again.

oddegg69
oddegg69

Mr. Snowden, there are a lot of people and countries who would like the chance to do that. Even in that land of free speech that you are living in now.

Scola
Scola

@siaripop7 I'm not.  The American people have shown themselves time and time again to have a short attention span.  By leaking out information bit by bit over time, he has kept the story of our government's illegal, immoral and unconstitutional behavior on our minds for quite some time.


Crazy?  Crazy like a fox perhaps.

rkapo7
rkapo7

@rock0267 Depends on your perspective. Hitler and Stalin like you also considered Germans or USSR citizens traitors if they tried to reveal or expose there excesses. Are you saying it is OK to be like Hitler and Stalin? I keep forgetting though it is the USA he is talking about. It always has God on its side. 


Scola
Scola

@rock0267 A traitor to our secret police and a defender of our constitution and founding principles.  A modern day Patrick Henry:  "Give me liberty or give me death."

rock0267
rock0267

@TedBell-BeverlyHills Do you ACTUALLY believe that with the capture/kill of Bin Laden that our threat from terrorism is over?????! Wow. That's all I can say. Wow.

ChristianCoopersmith
ChristianCoopersmith

@poliphobic he is a hero. and people from all walks of life believe that. I have been a republican for a long time and Snowden is the furthest thing imaginable from a traitor. People who call him a traitor are making a fundamental error -- they are confused about what America is. America is its citizens, its people. America is not the government. Even if what Snowden did met the legal requirements to be treason -- which it clear does not -- there is no moral case for Treason either, because his actions have only helped the American people. The sad fact is that, day to day, American's are infinitely more at risk from their own federal government than they are from violent attacks from abroad.

MarkKatz1
MarkKatz1

poliphobic: If he is your defenition of a hero you are truly a moron!!! If you think so much of him why don't you go to Russia and then you can bow down to your so called hero!!

rock0267
rock0267

@poliphobic He is a traitor to this country and deserves a traitor's death... by firing squad just as soon as we go into where he is hiding and pry him out by his fingernails (as painfully as possible).

Scola
Scola

@Ruleoflaw10 If he is a traitor than every human rights activist is a traitor.  He revealed the evil, unconstitutional and anti-American actions our government is involved in.  He is a traitor to our secret police and the best friend the American people and American democracy could hope for.

Sibir_Russia
Sibir_Russia

@oddegg69  

Freedom of speech and press, transparency of government activities.

In January 2012, non-governmental organization Reporters without Borders brought down by 27 points the U.S. rating in its annual World Press Freedom Index, ranking it 47th (57th taking into account territories under Washington’s exterritorial jurisdiction) after attacks against journalists who were covering the Occupy Wall Street actions. According to this NGO, more than 80 journalists were injured during their coverage of protests due to the use of excessive police force. The research carried out by the Network of Independent Legal Experts (the Protest and Assembly Rights Project) revealed that from September, 2011, through July, 2012, at least 18 accredited reporters were arrested in New York City alone.

On August 4, 2012, New York Times photographer Robert Stolarik was detained when he disobeyed a policeman’s order to stop taking photos of the arrest of a teenage girl during an Occupy Wall Street protest. One of the law enforcement officers snatched the journalist’s camera and smashed it in his face. The photographer will face a court trial in November 2012 on charges of "disobeying police orders."

In February 2012, Joshua Fox, director of the Oscar-nominated "Gasland" documentary about the environmental dangers of hydraulic fracturing, a controversial method used in the mining industry, was arrested trying to film a hearing of the House of Representatives Subcommittee on Science on the use of that method. Capitol police later charged him with "illegal entry" on the ground that he was not accredited to the House. Lawmakers had previously denied the ABC and Fox TV channels their right to film the hearings.

In November 2010, correspondent Kaelyn Forde and cameraman Jon Conway of Russia Today were detained while covering a protest outside the Fort Benning military base. The journalists charged with taking part in an unauthorized public meeting and insubordination to the authorities, were released on ransom after 32 hours of custody and paid a $290 fine each.

The last four years have seen a record number of criminal cases related to leaks of classified information to mass media. 6 persons, including U.S. Army soldier Bradley Manning who passed information to the WikiLeaks web resource, were charged with violating the 1917 Espionage Act.

Before his transfer to the Leavenworth Penitentiary in Kansas in April, 2011, following a petition signed by 295 American legal experts, the soldier was kept in a single cell without bedclothes or personal effects. He was permitted one 45-minute outdoor exercise a day. All his clothes and spectacles were taken away from Manning for the night, allegedly to prevent suicide.

After a series of leaks to the mass media of information on U.S. secret operations, particularly on the raid that killed Osama Bin Laden, and a cyber‑attack against Iran’s nuclear program, U.S. lawmakers promised to toughen up legislation in this area. The Information Security Oversight Office has reported a record number of more than 92 million classified documents issued throughout 2011.

The journalist community is concerned with the bill providing for the allocation of budgetary funds in 2013 to meet the intelligence needs. It includes a provision prohibiting intelligence officers from passing any operational information to journalists for publication confidentially or anonymously. Furthermore, the bill contains provisions which, as representatives of the mass media fear, would make it easier for the authorities to obtain evidence from them.

Journalists no longer expect U.S. Congress to pass a federal act that would guarantee their right to keep their sources and documents secret (except in some cases when the court finds the disclosure of such information necessary).

More and more often, journalists in the USA lose their jobs because of their "politically incorrect" opinions. Thus, in June 2010, famous journalist Helen Thomas had to retire under the pressure of influential Jewish circles after slamming Israeli actions against the Freedom Flotilla. In July 2010, CNN fired Octavia Nasr, senior editor for the Middle East, who expressed via Tweeter her regrets over the death of religious leader of Lebanese Shiites Sayyed Fadlallah.

In 2011, legendary singer and WWII veteran Tony Bennett had to apologize for his opinion expressed during a TV show that the 9/11 attacks had been provoked by U.S. military operations in the Middle East, for which he was severely criticized.

 

rock0267
rock0267

@rkapo7 @rock0267  wow! Are you actually comparing America to Nazi Germany or the USSR? Incredible. No, this is about the law. Anybody who has security clearances is legally bound, BY CONTRACT THAT THEY SIGN, to protect those secrets. If not, they are THOROUGHLY briefed on the penalties. Believe me, I know. What would happen if everyone little civilian or private just decided on his own to release secrets? If you think that's a good thing, well, than it's YOU who should be living in Stalin's USSR. AND they have already proven that not only did he release secrets that he was privy too, but he also used his supervisors pass codes to access even more secrets that he wasn't legally able to view. He is a traitor and like all traitors, needs to be punished.

rock0267
rock0267

@Scola @rock0267 Jeesh. You are highly delusional. It's never even close to being the same thing. Wow.

Scola
Scola

@rock0267 @TedBell-BeverlyHills Billions of dollars of government waste and erosion of our essential freedoms is not going to protect us from a few guys with box cutters.  


It's time to abolish the NSA.  They cost too much and do more harm than good.

Scola
Scola

@MarkKatz1 He gave up everything for his country.  He sacrificed his freedom to defend ours.  He stood up for our constitution and our essential liberty in the face of people who would like to see him dead.


What is your definition of hero?

rock0267
rock0267

@Scola @Ruleoflaw10 no, for one key reason. He signed a contract that said he would protect classified information entrusted to his care. He violated that contract and deserves all the punishment that we can give him, including a firing squad. Human rights activists don't have such documents hanging over their heads nor are they entrusted with the classified material to begin with.

rkapo7
rkapo7

@Sibir_Russia @oddegg69Time more thinking Russians speak up like you have. Expose the duplicity of many Western nations.

You are the best qualified people to speak up. Most Journalists and Politicians in the USA in particular still seem to like to distort everything Russian. I am no expert on Russia but have spent 2 months there with a good intelligent Russian family. One member could speak fluent English. Within weeks as an Australian with an open mind it became very apparent to me I had been fed just as much Propaganda or more than USSR citizens and still was being fed that crap by mainly USA media and British media. I also quickly picked up Russians overall can easily see how two faced the West often is. Especially the USA. Every USA report I saw when there on anything Russian was distorted completely. It occurred to me that Putin does not have to censor out USA reports. They usually are so distorted they are counter-productive. They on average do him nothing but good. Keep up the good work and keep replying to all these brainwashed people in the West. Unlike most Russians they are not even aware there Governments and there Media have been brainwashing them for decades. I now understand how frustrated Putin felt at his first Media Conference in Sochi after the Georgian attack when he said something along the lines to a group of European Journalists. " I don't know how they do it? They are supposed to ahve a free media?" He was referring to the continuing lie still being put over US and British Media. "Russia has attacked Georgia". Lies put out by the Bush Administration. We got the same crap here in Australia for 3 days from US sources on our media also. Then when some of our Journalists got there we started to get the truth. There were literally scores of things I had been lied to about during the Cold War period. I had never heard the truth about the Cuban crisis either caused in reality by the arrogant actions of the US putting Nuclear Missiles on the USSR border. Resolved by a humiliating back down by the USA. Keep up the good work. Educated Russians are in a good position to point out all the duplicity in the West. Many will not like it. That of course is why they don't like Putin. With his intellect and quick mind he is good at pointing out clearly the duplicity and stupidity often of US AND British Administrations. The sanctimonious attitudes of the USA in particular has to be changed somehow. It is now as if they genuinely believe there own propaganda. Very dangerous when your leaders get to that stage. My own country and our media at times also disappoints me in this way. 

smAlbanyRules
smAlbanyRules

@Sibir_Russia @oddegg69 

You make some good points. I think that the "Government of the people, by the people, for the people" is no longer our Government. It seems the Government is no longer responsible to anyone or anything other then itself. A sad turn of events.  

RobertNguyen
RobertNguyen

@Scola @rock0267  There is truth in what you are saying. Its best for Ed to come home and not living with the enemy. Its also best for our government to grant him some sort of guarantee to allow him to come home. Its too dangerous and too costly for the country not knowing what he had taken with him...Time to go home. 

Scola
Scola

@rock0267 @Scola I understand that you must hold that opinion.  It is clear from your responses that you have sold our your country and sold out the principles of Patrick Henry for a paycheck.  Thinking that it is not the same thing is the only way people like you can sleep at night.

rock0267
rock0267

@rkapo7 @rock0267 @smAlbanyRules @Scola @Ruleoflaw10  I know you will probably have a hard time figuring this out, but I am going to try anyway. One, You are talking the difference of people who MURDERED people and Snowden being upsdet because we collected phone numbers (not conversations... phone numbers. MEANT TO PROTECT US!!). Second, Snowden clearly broke the law. He has admitted to breaking the law. Unless you have ever had either Top Secret or Secret clearance, you may not understand this. But, believe me, getting those clearances is not easy. You have to be vetted by several agencies and you must sign contracts stating that you will protect those secrets given to you. You are also thoroughly briefed that if you fail to do so, especially on purpose, you will be punished and the punishment could be imprisonment or death. He willingly signed those agreements. What would happen if every little person out there who happened to disagree with any secret that they came across and just decided to give it out? If you think that would be a good thing... well, you would be an id iot.. These things are classified for a reason and frankly it's none of his business WHY they were classified. The reasons are 'above his pay grade'.  If he did have a problem, there really are chains of command to address them. He didn't even try those steps. So, please, stopping trying to compare nazi germany to the protection of state secrets. You make yourself a fool.

rock0267
rock0267

@Scola @rock0267 @Ruleoflaw10 Yes, I am fully aware that You're welcome should be 're and not your. However, after having written it properly several times over the years on these stupid liberal web sites (and Time is most assuredly liberal), the posters keep 'correcting' me and saying it's your. Of course, I knew otherwise, but figured they were just too stupid to know the correct way. I got tired of going back and correcting them so I just figured it easier to give in and let them think they understand what I am typing. Kudos to you for actually knowing the difference.

Scola
Scola

@rock0267 @Scola @Ruleoflaw10 Not to put too fine of a point on it, but "you're" (short for "you are") not "your".  I'm sure I made errors in at least one post myself, but not when my message was 3 words long.


Apparently people who don't understand basic grammar and who don't know the difference between our Constitution and our Declaration of Independence are monitoring our phone calls and claiming to have the right to execute heroic citizens by firing squad.  God help us.

Scola
Scola

@rock0267 @Scola @Ruleoflaw10  "It's a well established policy that ALL countries have, and need, to protect the government itself."


I'm not terribly interesting in protecting the government itself.  The government is a means to an end.  It is there to protect the liberties of the governed.  It is supposed to operate by the consent of the governed to that end.  If the government becomes an enemy of the liberties of the citizenry, it not only should not be defended, it should be reformed, and if reform is impossible, it should be destroyed and replaced by a new government that will do that job.


Protecting the government is not my concern.  Protecting the government from its citizens is the purview of tyrants.


"You can just thank those of us who have held these secrets and protected your sorry behind over the years."


Please stop.  I did not ask you to spy on me or my fellow citizens.  Please go home and leave the American people alone.  Thanks.

rock0267
rock0267

@Scola @rock0267 @Ruleoflaw10 I did misspeak on the source of the quote. But at least I know the meaning behind both documents... unlike you have proven for yourself. So, you can cut and paste. Good job. Now, try to understand the actual words.

rock0267
rock0267

@Scola @rock0267 @Ruleoflaw10 No, the NSA is not establishing that. That is the same for ANY release of ANY classified material that you are entrusted with. Again, when you gain security clearance, either Secret or Top Secret, you must promise to never release that information except to people who have a 'need to know'. It's a well established policy that ALL countries have, and need, to protect the government itself. Everybody who has secret clearance is WELL AWARE of this and the punishments. It is not something that just anybody off the street can receive. You have to have been filtered by the FBI and other agencies. Obviously, sometimes a bad applie, like Snowden, will slip through. If you can't understand the need to have or protect classified materials, well, then you never will. If you do understand the need for them, you should be able to understand that there must be consequences to the unauthorized release of them. It is NOT up to any individual analyst to decide what to release and what not to. The reasons why something is classified is often 'above their pay grade'. I don't expect you to understand. You can just thank those of us who have held these secrets and protected your sorry behind over the years. Your welcome.

Scola
Scola

@rock0267 @Scola @Ruleoflaw10 By the way, I quoted the Declaration of Independence, not the Constitution.


Perhaps you should study up a bit on our founding documents and reflect on what they mean.  

Scola
Scola

@rock0267 @Scola @Ruleoflaw10 What part of "secret police" does not apply?  Are they not a form of police?  Are they not secret?


And now we've established that those who stand up against them "deserve to be shot by firing squad."  Personally I find that terrifying.  The wonton abuse of power.  

Is this what we have become?

rock0267
rock0267

@Scola @rock0267 @Ruleoflaw10 You know what's sad? What's sad is you calling a government agency of the US 'secret police'. You are pathetic. You are NOT an American citizen. Don't you DARE quote the Constitution to me. You have NO IDEA of the meaning of those words unless they suit your particular needs at the time. Edward Snowden acted as a cowardly treasonous traitor and deserves to be shot by a firing squad for turning in state secrets to another foreign country. YOU can not call yourself an American because you have no meaning of the word. Again, I can tell YOU were never entrusted to have a Secret or Top Secret clearance. You have proven you are not trust worthy enough.

Scola
Scola

@rock0267 @smAlbanyRules @Scola @Ruleoflaw10 It is the duty of all Americans to defend our liberties and our constitution.  Anyone who signs a contract that runs contrary to this duty is a traitor to his country.


Edward Snowden is a patriot.  You, sir, are a traitor.

Scola
Scola

@rock0267 @Scola @Ruleoflaw10  It is clear that you put a contract with our secret police over his duty as a citizen of the United States.  Too many people in Washington think that way.  It is sad, especially in a city named after a commissioned British officer who had sworn an oath of loyalty to the British king but rebelled none the less when that regime proved repressive.


May I remind you:

"We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.--That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, --That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness."


Edward Snowden acted as an American patriot in finest tradition laid forth by our founding fathers.

rock0267
rock0267

@smAlbanyRules @rock0267 @Scola @Ruleoflaw10 Well, from your comments, it's obvious you have never had a secret or top secret clearance. I have. I know what is expected of you. Believe what you want about it, there actually IS a chain of command to take your problems. He completely went around it. And yes, the contract IS all important because you are being entrusted with classified material. It is classified FOR A REASON. And it is NOT up to every little analyst or private in the military to agree or disagree with ANY of it. Period. What if a person were predisposed to be against nuclear weapons. In your world, would it be ok if they just gave away nuclear secrets because they didn't agree with the weapons? When  you are trusted with either secret or top secret clearance you are THOROUGHLY briefed, again and again, that if you release this material you are subject to penalties, including death. If you don't like it. Work someplace else. If you have a major problem with something, take it to your superior. That is the ONLY way this type of program can work. IF the NSA did something wrong, that is a totally different issue and can be handled separately. The fact is that he broke the law and he must face the consequences of which he was fully told of before hand.

smAlbanyRules
smAlbanyRules

@rock0267 @Scola @Ruleoflaw10 

With all due respect, it sounds like you put the "contract" that he had with the Government above all else. Regardless of the actions of the NSA, however wrong, evil or illegal they may be, because he had a contract, he is a traitor? This is where we differ - I believe he did the right thing -  the moral obligation and oath to uphold the US Constitution supersedes any contract. Remember Hitler and all the people that "just followed orders"... or have you forgotten. 

Look to Ukraine to see how this monitoring can and is being used to punish, threaten and control the protesters.  Sorry but I believe you are very wrong on this point.