Tiananmen and the Earthquake Effect

One interesting exercise during the anniversary of the Tiananmen killings is to consider what people in Hong Kong think. On the mainland people don’t talk about June 4 that often, which is partly due to the fact that it has now been 19 years. But of course as Simon notes below the subject is banned from public discourse, so some of that …

6.4

Today, of course, is the anniversary of the bloody crushing of the 1989 Tiananmen protests. The writer Ma Jian has written a screed in the London Times criticizing current Chinese writers for failing to speak out about the issue and generally being establishment (read Communist Party) lackeys. I am reading Ma’s latest novel, called …

Spence on Confucius

The legendary China scholar Jonathan Spence of Yale is giving the BBC’s annual Reith lectures this year. You can listen or download the first talk, on Confucius, here. Spence is incapable of saying or writing anything dull on China and this first lecture of four is characteristically fascinating.

The Gloves Come Off

From the Associated Press comes a story today about police shutting down a protest by angry parents in Sichuan:

(DUJIANGYAN, China) — Chinese police dragged away more than 100 parents Tuesday while they were protesting the deaths of their children in poorly constructed schools that collapsed in last month’s earthquake.

The parents,

Walking Into The Disaster

During my week in Sichuan after the quake one thing that I repeatedly encountered, especially once we began venturing towards the epicenter, were people that had covered incredible distances over mountains and shattered roads to find family members. Transportation in that region of China is difficult to begin with; landslides and bridge …

Is the U.S. Finally Getting Serious About Cyberwar ?

Further on the laptops and cybersecurity discussed in my last post, an article in the National Journal gives a lengthy and detailed portrait of the state of U.S. thinking on cyberwar, and in particular the threat from China. Some of the allegations in the story (mainly that the some poeple in the U.S. defense establishment think that a …

When Sichuan looks like Iraq…

You can see video of it on television or on the internet over and over, or you can read about it in newspapers and magazines, but seeing the destruction of a few these so called “Tofu” schools in Sichuan province over the past few days has been mind numbing. That’s particularly true for the one in Dujiangyan, closest to Chengdu, …

Might disaster relief fatigue be starting to set in?

Just before traveling to Sichuan yesterday, I had a conversation with a friend in Shanghai who said his parents—both retired—had been asked by the management at the apartment compound they live in to donate to a fund that fellow residents were putting together. They did so happily. Then, a couple of days later, the father was …

Loose Laptops

According to a recent AP story , “U.S. authorities are investigating whether Chinese officials secretly copied the contents of a government laptop computer during a visit to China by Commerce Secretary Carlos M. Gutierrez and used the information to try to hack into Commerce computers…..Surreptitious copying is believed to have …

Sharon Stone, the Chinese Media and Stirring Up Trouble

There has been a good deal of discussion in the Chinese media and blogosphere (and also on this blog: see comments on my Wen Jiabao post) about comments by has-been actress Sharon Stone in which she says the thought occurred to her that the earthquake was a karmic punishment for China being “not nice” to her “good friend” the Dalai Lama …

It Just Gets Worse…

I know from the outside looking in it’s easy to become somewhat numb to the death, destruction and dislocation in Sichuan. But it keeps getting worse. This AP dispatch from yesterday is mind blowing. At least 80,000 more people were evacuated last night to avoid potential flood waters that are backing up behind a landslide-produced …

Wen Jiabao: Super Mandarin

Global Voices Online features a translation of a fascinating interview with Premier Wen Jiabao. A number of things come through clearly. Most strongly of all perhaps is what a natural policy wonk Wen is and why he’s exactly the right man for the frighteningly complex job of clean up and reconstruction after the earthquake. Even though it …

  1. 1
  2. ...
  3. 547
  4. 548
  5. 549
  6. ...
  7. 596