Austin Ramzy

Austin Ramzy has been a Beijing correspondent for TIME since 2007. An Iowa native, he graduated from Middlebury College with a degree in Asian Studies and completed journalism school at the University of California, Berkeley. He previously worked at TIME Asia's Hong Kong office.

Articles from Contributor

How Will China Respond to its Lead Poisoning Epidemic?

In recent years protests over environmental hazards, including lead poisoning from poorly regulated factories, have erupted across China. While those demonstrations have grabbed attention here, it’s been difficult to measure the extent of the problem. Now a report from Human Rights Watch provides a fuller degree of insight into the scope …

The Drumbeats of War? Tensions Rise in the South China Sea

Disputes over the South China Sea often provoke feelings of déjà-vu. That was especially the case this week, when Vietnam accused a Chinese ship of deliberately cutting exploration cables that were being towed by a seismic survey vessel working for PetroVietnam, the state-run oil and gas group. Vietnam says the June 9 incident occurred …

China’s Military Tries to Reassure Wary Neighbors

Years of sharp increases in military spending coupled with territorial disputes with some of its neighbors have contributed to growing suspicions over Chinese intentions. So China’s military brass is on a campaign to reassure governments in the Asia-Pacific region that the modernization of the People’s Liberation Army poses no …

How Will China’s Food Supply Weather the Year of Drought?

In China food supplies and food prices are deeply sensitive topics. So by the time the U.N.’s Food and Agriculture Organization issued a special alert warning in February that a prolonged drought in the North China Plain was a “potentially serious problem” for the country’s winter wheat crop, China’s leaders had already …

Chinese Authorities Try to Limit Protests in Inner Mongolia

Parts of Inner Mongolia, the region that forms much of China’s northern border, have been put under tight control following protests touched off by the hit-and-run death of a herder who was run over by a coal truck. The killing of Mergen, who like some ethnic Mongolians goes by a single name, has raised concerns about development and …

Chinese City Shaken by Multiple Bomb Blasts

Three coordinated explosions rocked a southern Chinese city Thursday morning, injuring at least five people, according to state media reports. The bombs exploded near municipal buildings in Fuzhou, a city of 3.9 million in Jiangxi province, injuring at least five people. (Update: State media now say two people have died and seven are …

U.S., Chinese Interests on Display in Karachi Raid

As news emerged Monday about the attack on a naval base in Karachi, it appeared that Pakistan’s ally China might also be caught up in the mayhem. Some initial reports suggested that Chinese military personnel were being held hostage. That news was later denied by the Chinese Foreign Ministry. My colleague Omar Waraich’s story

Protester Pelts Father of China’s Online Censorship Regime

China’s “Great Firewall,” the system of online controls that keep Internet users from seeing information the Beijing government deems sensitive, was built and is maintained by unknown thousands of programmers and engineers. So it is perhaps unfair to give one man credit for creating the censorship regime. Fang Binxing, a computer …

Amid U.S. Doubts, Pakistan Finds Old Friends in China

The visit to China by Pakistani Prime Minister Yousuf Raza Gilani has been widely described as an effort to seek support from an old friend at a time when Pakistan’s government and military are facing difficult questions over the degree of official complicity in sheltering Osama bin Laden. But even as China has defended Pakistan’s …

A Month of Scandals for Beijing’s Forbidden City

Beijing’s Forbidden City gets its name from the fact that it was once off limits to anyone who did not have the permission to enter from the Chinese emperor. It’s also known as the gu gong, or former palace, a firm reminder that such elitism is a thing of the past, never mind that the Communist Party’s leadership compound of …

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